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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Chinese (Division 339)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Chinese.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411; and Chinese 361, 362, 411, 421). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (June 9 to August 15). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 366, 369, 373, and 374 will run from June 26 until August 19.

See Summer Term section of this Course Guide for course descriptions. All students must apply for admission to the program. Contact the department at 936-3915 for more information.


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Chinese.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Chinese.


Note: The Department Waitlist policy for all courses is 2 Go to the department office to get on a waitlist, and then attend the first class meeting. Policies and procedures for handling the waitlist will be explained there.

The Department of Asian Languages and Cultures offers intensive language instruction in Chinese and Japanese at the first-, second-, and third-year levels (Japanese 361, 362, 411; and Chinese 361, 362, 411, 421). These language courses are part of the Asian Summer Language Institute. They are officially listed as Summer Term courses, but PLEASE NOTE that they start several weeks before normal Summer Term courses (June 9 to August 15). South and Southeast Asia courses 365, 366, 369, 373, and 374 will run from June 26 until August 19.

All students must apply for admission to the program. Contact the department at 936-3915 for more information.


Chinese 250/Asian Studies 251. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Culture Courses/Literature Courses

Section 201 Containing the "Footloose". Woman and Family in Modern China. Meets with Women's Studies 253.201

Instructor(s): Jin Feng (jinf@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By examining the literary representation of women outside the family in modern Chinese literature (from the 1910s to the 1030s), this course will explore the relationships between woman and patriarchy, woman and writing, woman and modernity with both a distinctive chinese context and broader comparative reflection.

What happens after Nora leaves home? This question raised by the modern Chinese intellectuals more than eighty years ago continues to inspire our imagination even today. It not only addresses the realistic, historical concerns of the May Fourth generation, but also raises questions as to the relationships between woman and writing, woman and patriarchy, and woman and modernity. Therefore, in this course, by examining the figure of woman both inside and outside familial structure in various works ranging from fiction, autobiographical works, and journal articles, we will explore how modern China comes into being in literature through the representation of woman in an era of political turmoil, cultural tranformations, and self-discoveries.

The emancipation of women and the modernization of China were uttered in the same breath by many modern Chinese intellectuals. Whether to promote an ideal motherhood for the reproduction of modern Chinese citizens, or to reveal the social injustice inflicted upon women and thus advocate the demolition of the old patriarchal system, they always use the trope of woman to legitimate their callings for modernization and revolution. Consequently, as a literary sample of the "woman question," the figure of the woman can be seen as a contemporary signifier of the project of modernization in China. As female students, revolutionaries or writers, these women establish modern womanhood on the basis of their revolutionary characteristics. That is to say, their modernity is defined by their difference from the traditional domestic woman, just as modern Chinese fiction fixes its niche by violently denouncing its classical tradition. But in what way are the women outside the family similar to or different from those inside the family? Is the difference in the production and dissemination of this figure rather a difference that masks continuity with apparent discontinuity with tradition?

Although the pre-modern vernacular tales also produce a crop of "stray" women, mainly matchmakers, courtesans, Buddhist nuns and other variations, these stories often reproduce domesticity to restore respectability and contain transgression. In the modern Chinese fiction, especially the May Fourth fiction, on the other hand, the dominant revolutionary discourse of the time by necessity promotes the abolishment of the patriarchal family system. Meanwhile, tension and anxiety also arise in the construction of modern male subjectivity in literature. By probing how woman is represented and what has changed in the relationship between the narrator and the figure, this course intends to examine both the continuity and transitions in Chinese literature and culture.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Chinese 361. Intensive Beginning Chinese.

Language Courses

Section 201 Course meets June 7- August 13, 1999. Application Required Contact Department

Instructor(s): Hilda Tao (htao@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (10). (LR).

Credits: (10).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~iinet/sli/

An introductory course in modern spoken and written Mandarin Chinese. The course is aimed at the acquisition of basic structural skills through aural-oral exercises, carefully graded reading practice, and the use of videotapes. At the end of the course, students will have learned 350 characters and accompanying combinations. Students should practice with language tapes for two hours for each class hour. Texts: Beginning Chinese, by J. DeFrancis; Beginning Chinese Reader, by J. DeFrancis; Video Skits, by H. Tao. This course is part of the International Institute's Summer Language Institute and runs from June 7 August 13, 1999. Application is required; if you are interested please contact the Department of Asian Languages and Cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

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