Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff


Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Economics (Division 358)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Economics.


Econ. 101. Principles of Economics I.

Introductory Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics. Both 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in economics. Economics 101 concentrates on the microeconomics of the modern economy: how markets function under competitive conditions as well as with various other types of market organization; the distribution of income and wealth; the public sector; socialism; and related topics of current interest. Grades are based largely on course-wide hour tests and the final exam, but there will also be quizzes in the sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 102. Principles of Economics II.

Introductory Courses

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics. In Economics 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. The major concerns of this course are the determinants of GNP, unemployment, inflation, international trade, and economic growth. The section meetings are limited to 35 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 395. Topics in Economics and Economic Policy.

Other Topics in Economics

Section 101 The Economics of Cities and Suburbs. (3 credits)

Instructor(s): Tom Bogart (wtbogart@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we examine the implications of spatial location for economic analysis. One of the most important implications is that households and firms can find it advantageous to cluster together in cities. These cities trade with each other, and the pattern of specialization and trade that develops can be analyzed using the familiar notion of comparative advantage. Comparative advantage and clustering can explain not only the location of cities relative to each other but also the distribution of economic activity within an urban area. We will also consider the role of public policy direct (for example, zoning) and indirect (for example, the level of gasoline taxes) on intraurban location patterns. The course will emphasize applying the theoretical analysis to real world issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 401. Intermediate Microeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Jan Gerson (jgerson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (4). (SS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/SP99/EC401/index.html

This course deals with the theoretical analysis of consumers, firms, markets, and price determination. The analysis is rigorous, using the tools of algebra, geometry, and elementary calculus in constructing models. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. Economics 401 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is not recommended that 401 and 402 be taken in the same term. Main lecture will meet twice a week. Sections will meet twice a week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 402. Intermediate Macroeconomic Theory.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 101.

Instructor(s): George Johnson (gjohnson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102, and Math. 115. (3). (SS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course in macroeconomics deals with the determination of broad economic aggregates such as national income, employment, the price level, and the balance of payments in both the short run and the long run. Rigorous analysis is used to understand the forces that determine these economic variables, and how they are affected by public policies. It is predominantly a lecture course, with grades based on hour test(s) and final exam. Prerequisites include one term of calculus. Economics 402 is a prerequisite for many other courses offered in Economics. Concentrators in economics are required to elect this course and are encouraged to complete it early in their concentration program. It is strongly recommended that students take Economics 401 before 402.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 404. Statistics for Economists.

Economic Theory and Statistics

Section 101.

Instructor(s): E. Philip Howrey (eph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102 and Math. 115. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 405 or Stat. 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412. (4). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/SP99/EC404/index.html

This course provides an introduction to descriptive statistics, probability theory, statistical inference, and regression analysis. There are three lectures and one problem session per week. Grades are based on problem sets and exams. The course, which is self-contained, does not serve as a prerequisite to Economics 406.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 411. Monetary and Financial Theory.

Monetary and Financial Economics

Section 101.

Instructor(s): John Belknap

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 402, and 404 or 405. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 411 focuses on modern financial markets and the role of monetary and fiscal policy in influencing asset prices and the economy. Monetary and financial economics are developed at a formal level. Topics covered can include financial institutions and markets, interest rate determination, portfolio theory, capital markets, the regulation of financial institutions, the money supply process, money demand, monetary policy, national saving and the national debt. Evaluation will be based on homework assignments, two midterms, and the final exam. Method of instruction is lecture and discussion. The required prerequisite is Economics 402, Intermediate Macroeconomics. Additional recommended prerequisite is Economics 401, Intermediate Microeconomics.

**This course will have a special schedule pertaining to the hours it taught**

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Econ. 498. Honors Independent Research.

Honors Program, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to students admitted to Honors concentration in economics. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Econ. 499. Independent Research.

Honors Program, Seminars, and Independent Research

Section.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the economics concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be used in an economics concentration program. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Economics.


Econ. 498. Honors Independent Research.

Honors Program, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to students admitted to Honors concentration in economics. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is for undergraduates writing senior Honors theses. Each student's grade for the course and levels of Honors achieved will depend entirely on the quality of the thesis, as evaluated by the thesis advisor with whom the student has arranged to work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Economics.

Econ. 101. Principles of Economics I.

Introductory Courses

Section 201.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Econ. 101. Principles of Economics I.

Introductory Courses

Section 202.

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 101 is the first part of the two-term introduction to economics. Both 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in economics. Economics 101 concentrates on the microeconomics of the modern economy: how markets function under competitive conditions as well as with various other types of market organization; the distribution of income and wealth; the public sector; socialism; and related topics of current interest. Grades are based largely on course-wide hour tests and the final exam, but there will also be quizzes in the sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 102. Principles of Economics II.

Introductory Courses

Section 201.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics. In Economics 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. The major concerns of this course are the determinants of GNP, unemployment, inflation, international trade, and economic growth. The section meetings are limited to 35 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 102. Principles of Economics II.

Introductory Courses

Section 202.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Econ. 400. (3). (SS). (QR/2).

Half QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Economics 101 and 102 are required as prerequisites to the concentration and to upper-level courses in Economics. In Economics 102, the fundamental concepts and theories of macroeconomics are developed and used to analyze problems of current interest. The major concerns of this course are the determinants of GNP, unemployment, inflation, international trade, and economic growth. The section meetings are limited to 35 students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 360. The Developing Economies.

Economic Development

Section 201.

Instructor(s): F Thompson (fthom@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 101 and 102. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 461. (3). (SS).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Most people live in "less developed countries" with much lower average incomes than the United States and other "developed countries" and this inequality continues to increase in severity. This course explores alternative conceptions of economic development, investigates proposed explanations for international variations, and critically examines competing strategies for alleviating global poverty and enlarging opportunities for human flourishing, especially for those worst off. A further focus is potential implications of global development in the more developed countries. The main text for the course is Economic Development by Michael P. Todaro (1997). Written work for the course consists of an early short (5 page) paper and a longer (12-15 page) term paper on a mutually agreeable topic, and midterm and final examinations. Discussion is strongly encouraged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 431. Industrial Organization and Performance.

Industrial Organization and Public Control

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Dmitriy Stolyarov

Prerequisites & Distribution: Econ. 401. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is twofold: to introduce the students to the concepts and analytical tools that help analyze the market structures and firms' behavior; and regulatory policies that promote effective competition.

In the first part to the course, we will study how the product markets are defined, how the sellers interact with other sellers and potential entrants, and how firms determine their price policy, sales, and promotion.

In the second part, we will address specific aspects of firm behavior such as advertising, choice of quality and durability, pricing, and marketing tactics. For each of these topics we will discuss the relevant legal structure governing and monitoring the industry and the economic rationale behind these regulatory policies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Econ. 499. Independent Research.

Honors Program, Seminars, and Independent Research

Prerequisites & Distribution: Written permission of staff member supervising research, and permission of the economics concentration advisor. (1-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be used in an economics concentration program. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Student and instructor agree on a substantial piece of work involving reading or research. Evaluation is based on the written work, either papers or examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

lsa logo

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index

This page maintained by LS&A Academic Information and Publications, 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 1999 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.

This page was created at 11:46 AM on Wed, Aug 11, 1999.