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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


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Spring Half-Term

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Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.
Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Spring Term 1998 is May 15, 1998. The deadline for Independent Study in the Summer Term 1998 is July 10, 1998.


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Eric Breedon

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Think summer. The pool. Not lounging by the water, reading, working on your tan. But swimming, hard, day after day, working your body through the chlorinated drench. This introductory class in composition will be an immersion course. That is to say that we will meet together six hours a week for seven weeks. We will quickly become immersed in the culture of writing, in the fluid miracle of language.

In this water we will begin to breathe clear, intent, and beautiful language. Though we may struggle with issues concerning writing, we will not drown in them. Instead, we will work together, helping each other to become better, stronger writers, authors capable of creating engaging and important essays again and again, cutting through these waters, leaving a wake as testament to our success.

We will accomplish our goals through exercises, in-class writing assignments, readings, thorough discussions, journal entries, workshops and the writing of three essays. We will begin with the micro and move to the macro. First, we will closely examine sentence structure and word choice. From there we will discuss issues of paragraphing and organization. In addition, we will also explore and reckon with matters of voice, style, passion, and scholarship.

Please come to class open to the possibilities of language, willing to experiment, ready to question and inquire, and prepared to expect the unexpected.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Valerie Moses

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What does a critical analysis look like? Can you explain the difference between a summary and an argument? How do you construct a lucid, interesting thesis? There are some of the questions this course will cover in an effort to break down the steps to writing an effective essay. This class will operate under the premise that becoming a better reader can help one to become a better writer. Accordingly, we will study writing strategies by reading an array of academic essays, newspaper and magazine articles, and your peers' papers. Writing assignments will include regular response papers, revisions, in-class writing, and peer reviews.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Scott Kassner (skassner@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 104 Blurring Genres: The Personal, The Literary, The Autobiographical

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Buchanan (jmbuchan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course in writing; its main purpose is to help you to successfully meet the demands made by this university and the world beyond it on you as a writer. You will be required to perform various kinds of writing this term, including essays (of varying length: 3-7 pages), a literature review, reading responses, and a group project report. We will reflect on the expectations for various written forms and evaluate aspects of our own work that communicate clearly and persuasively our ideas and opinions. This kind of work illustrates the importance of reading in the writing classroom; to be good writers, we must also be attentive readers. In this course, we will read academic essays, a novel or collection of short stories, autobiographical essays, and lots of student writing. Our intention is to read closely to locate rhetorical strategies that we find effective in persuading, describing, explaining, and signifying. We will also study genre; we will investigate ways in which literature, autobiography, and personal writing might inform the academic essay.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 105.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 106.

Instructor(s): Dresier

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to assist you in your development as a writer. Contrary to what many of you may think, the demand for clear, coherent, and forceful writing extends far beyond the halls of the English Department. Intricately linked to the acts of reading and critical thinking, mastery of the craft of writing will provide you with a whole new approach to understanding the world. And the assumption that writing is a craft that can be learned and must be practiced lies at the heart of this course. We will glean specific rhetorical strategies and their consequences from the texts we read in class and ultimately try to incorporate them into our own work. We will also see how writers can (and must) vary their voices in order to achieve a particular goal or reach a specific audience. On the level of content, our main focus this half-term will be the exploration of what James McConkey has called the "anatomy of memory." The texts we will be reading all-in one way or another-deal with the question of how memory works, how it shapes our identities, and how it thus ultimately helps us establish our places in the world. Despite the Spring half-term's brevity, we shall attempt to include both fictional and non-fictional accounts in our selections, as well as tackle the concept of "visual" memory, especially in photographs. By the end of the half-term, our path will have led us all the way from personal reminiscences via collective memory to the idea of history as official memory. To be sure, the task of writing with proficiency on any given subject is a trying one that demands constant rethinking and revision. But should you ever feel frustrated with you own work, never forget: "Easy writing makes for bad reading" Carl Van Vechten.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Ciccarelli

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this section of introductory creative writing, the means of effective storytelling and poetic expression will be studied and developed in the students' own work. Since precise, evocative language is vital to both stories and poems, we will practice working with words in these forms. A greater portion of our focus will be on the short story, and we will begin with the basics characterization, setting, tension, point of view, etc.; we will use exercises, readings, and a survey of contemporary short fiction to build our understanding of the elements of the story. One of the most useful tools available to the beginning writer is the workshop; each student will have at least one piece of fiction and one poem workshopped in class. Students must complete a 25 page portfolio containing the revisions of two pieces of short fiction and 5-7 poems. There will also be a journal requirement that will include exercises and other assignments, as well as a brief presentation on a writer of your choice.

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Deborah Smith (delsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All writings are acts of manipulation. The exercise of writing or speaking is also an act of revealing one's individuality. The performance artist Anna Deavere Smith wrote: "Identity, in fact, lives in the unique way that a person departs from the English language in a perfect state to create something that is individual." We are all caught in a cacophony of juxtaposed lights and images; we are all hallucinating from media fixes, choking on bestseller-made-for-TV-movies, trembling from the machinery of murdered rap singers. In this class we will stumble through the intoxicating possibilities of voice through unusual exercises involving poetry, monologue, performance art, and media. By looking at paintings, reading a provocative selection of work and persuasive news articles and by listening to music we will explore a range of voices to be the retired widow shoplifting gum in the express line, to be the man in drag returning home for a high school reunion, to be the eighteen-year-old who finds America in a beat-up Chevy with a carton of cigarettes. This course will give you the tools to be experimental and thought-provoking. Course requirements: 8-10 revised poems, 20 pages revised fiction.

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We'll spend the first four weeks discussing short stories from the anthology along with the authors' commentaries. During the final three weeks, we'll concentrate on the two novels. Students will write two essays and a final exam. Texts will include: The Story and Its Writer (Fifth Edition), Ann Charters; Aspects of the Novel, E.M.Forster; A Portrait of the Artist, James Joyce; To the Lighthouse, Virginia Woolf. Coursework will include one short paper, one longer paper and an essay exam for the final.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What are the powers and limits of stories in print? To what extent is a literary text influenced by the culture with which it is intertwined? Most centrally, how does a literary text raise questions about the implications of cultural frameworks and assumptions those ideas, prejudices, and ideological contradictions, or "fault lines" which every culture possesses? In addressing these questions, our discussions will focus on textual strategies: how plot structures, methods of characterization, diction, narrative perspectives, and other devices produce effects in stories and novels.

The readings, then, will engage questions and stimulate discussion of ideas of gender, sexuality, nationality, and race as they arise in selected texts of American and British fiction. Course requirements consist of careful and thorough reading of all assigned texts, participation in discussions, a series of weekly short response papers, two longer essays, and a final exam. Texts will include: Austen, Pride and Prejudice; Lodge, Out of the Shelter; Gaines, A Lesson Before Dying; Oates, Because it is Bitter, and Because it is My Heart.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 101, 102.

Instructor(s): Yopie Prins (yprins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to the pleasures and challenges of reading poetry written in English over the past four centuries. You will learn how to interpret poems with special emphasis on the analysis of poetic form; you will learn how to write and revise critical essays about poetry; you will also be asked to memorize a poem and to attend at least one poetry reading. In the course of the term we will consider various poetic genres, such as sonnets, elegies, odes, dramatic monologues, and narrative verse. The class will proceed primarily by discussion and occasional student presentations in smaller groups, as well as a series of informal in-class writing exercises. Requirements for the course include regular attendance, active participation, and three short papers. There will be occasional quizzes, but no final exam.

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

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Engl. 301. The Power of Words.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will explore various uses of words in writing descriptive, analytic, and persuasive pieces, with a focus on types of writing that will be useful in professional life beyond the university. Since we gather vocabulary and writing patterns from observing, reading, and listening, the writing will be based on a diverse array of materials. To clear up any lingering grammatical and mechanical problems with students' work, each class will feature a brief lecture on an issue such as comma usage, sentence variety, or pronoun agreement. Section descriptions for courses not listed below can be found on the department's Web page (http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/courses/courses.htm).

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 101 New England Literature Program (NELP)

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section is part of the New England Literature Program (NELP). Application deadline was January 8. For those students interested in attending in Spring Half-Term 2000, there will be an information meeting in November 1999, with applications being due the first day of Winter Term 2000. For further information contact Jackie Livesay.

For an insight into the program, see the University Record article on the 1998 program.

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 102 Readings in Irish Literature

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How is it that this island nation with a population, north and south, of less than five million, has produced some of the most beautiful and powerful writing the world has seen? In this class we will get a sense of the history of Irish literature by reading a selection of fiction from the 19th century and before. Then we will take on the 20th century, when most of Ireland's literary masterpieces have been written. Among the books we will read are the novel Amongst Women by John McGahern, a novel and short stories by two Anglo-Irish cousins who collaborated under the name Somerville & Ross, a selection of poetry, and short stories by William Trevor. There will be brief weekly quizzes, one short paper, a midterm, and a final exam. Irish traditional music will be played every day before class begins, and one or two films will be shown. The course is taught in a multimedia format.

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Engl. 320/CAAS 338. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Huma Ibrahim

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 338.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 101 Fiction

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223, junior standing, and written permission of instructor. (2). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will compose thirty pages of polished fiction, complete various exercises, and provide oral and written critiques of one another's stories. We'll also discuss a number of short stories and their authors' commentaries from the anthology. Text: The Story and Its Writer (Fifth Edition), Ann Charters.

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Engl. 324. Creative Writing.

Section 101 New England Literature Program (NELP)

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and written permission of instructor. (3 in spring; 2 in summer). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the summer half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section is part of the New England Literature Program (NELP). Application deadline was January 8. For those students interested in attending in Spring Half-Term 2000, there will be an information meeting in November 1999, with applications being due the first day of Winter Term 2000. For further information contact Jackie Livesay.

For an insight into the program, see the University Record article on the 1998 program.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Ha

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study the essay form and its related manifestations in American culture by examining essays ranging from the Federalist Papers to movie reviews to editorials in the Michigan Daily. We will discuss the content, form, style, and evidence used in a variety of essays and learn to employ these elements effectively in our own writing. Course requirements include four essays, shorter writing assignments, and active participation in class discussions and activities.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Herman-Champagne

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

If you have felt stifled by the necessity of having a thesis statement at the end of your first paragraph, or irked by that rule that you never use "I" in your writing, this course is for you. Our prime directive will be to explore and to experiment bending the rules of writing and blurring the bounds of genre in exciting, productive ways. While other courses focus on the apparatus of evidence and argumentation, we will focus on style, voice, tone, nuance, and rhythm. You will write three genre-bending essays (none need be longer than seven pages) in which you may blend personal narrative and argumentation, fiction or poetry and literary criticism, graphic art and prose, or even performance and prose. You will be limited only by your imagination, and by your ability to explain (in a two-page justification) how the formal qualities of your essay are significant to the content that you are trying to communicate to your audience. Readings for the course will model experimentation and genre-bending.

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 103.

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an upper-level composition course for students interested in improving their writing. All classes will proceed on the assumption that these basic principles inform good writing: that writing is thinking, that writing well requires attention to issues of audience; that revision is a necessary part of the writing process; and that all writing reflects the writer's view of the world. Class discussion will include a consideration of student writing. To focus discussion and to provide subject matter for writing assignments, readings by professional writers will be assigned. You will write one paper (4-5 pages) per week.

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Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 101 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course that will concentrate on the Shakespearean tragedy by focusing on "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so, we will study the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm and an final exam. This course satisfies the Pre-1830 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 101 Reading the Pre-Modern Lyric. This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Ashby Kinch (akinch@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From philosophy to satire, from upright rhetoric to playful banter, from touching emotional connection to violent abuse, lyric poetry dazzles us with a striking variety of styles, modes, and themes. How do we learn to understand these acts of verbal creation captured in compact structures? In this course, we will survey lyric writing between the Old and Early Modern English periods. We will read and respond to riddles, recipes, poems of war and love, poems of praise and abuse, poems sacred and profane. The course will not progress chronologically; our readings will be organized thematically and stylistically. Students will develop specific skills pertinent to the reading of poetry (for example, analysis of rhyme and metrical structures), but above all they will use their imaginative and critical faculties to unpack the delights of these seductive texts. Students will write a weekly response paper. Attendance and participation are required. This course fulfills the Pre-1600 requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 101, 102 This course satisfies the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will focus on three distinct historical/cultural periods Victorian, modern, and postmodern. Comprehending these three periods, and the reasons why they have succeeded each other in time, will clarify a wide range of literary developments over the past two hundred years. To help characterize the three periods, we will explore each period's dominant ideas about individualism, gender difference, and aesthetic form. Course materials will include both novels and films. Probable texts include novels by Donald Barthelme, Charlotte Brontë, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Jean Rhys, and Charles Dickens, as well as 2-3 films. Midterm, final paper. This course fulfills the New Traditions requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

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Engl. 434. The Contemporary Novel.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Ira Konigsberg (ikonigsb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course covers a broad spectrum of contemporary writers and types of fiction. As well as establishing the specific themes and narrative methods of these literary figures and groups of novels, the course also seeks to discover similar concerns, ideas, and techniques especially in relation to recent social and cultural developments. The course especially focuses on the possibilities and impossibilities of fiction to deal with social and individual trauma in the real world of the twentieth century. The class will read Margaret Atwood's Surfacing, Toni Morrison's Sula, D. M. Thomas' The White Hotel, Don Delillo's White Noise, Julian Barnes' A History of the World in 10 1/2 Chapters, and Michael Ondaatje's The English Patient. Students will write two short papers and take a final examination.

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Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 101 American Drama: Before O'Neill/After Shepard. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. Drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U.S. culture in American Drama and American Drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays of Miller, Williams, and Hellman. Topics of class discussion will include: the emergence of a nativist theater tradition; the role of ethnicity; the situation of the female playwright; the conflict between commercial and artistic values; and the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage. Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shepard, Fornes, Lanford Wilson, Kushner, Wang, and August Wilson. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

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Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Livesay

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

No Description Provided.

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Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with {\i School of Education} teaching courses).

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

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Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for English.


Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with {\i School of Education} teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for English.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 201 Space and Society

Instructor(s): Peter Kalliney (kalliney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Have you ever wondered why so many suburban teenagers spend countless hours at the mall? Why does Disney World, a fantasy amusement park, have a place called Epcot Center, a sphere that houses culturally diverse samples of "reality," mimicked in lifelike detail, presented for our enjoyment? In this composition course, we will read, discuss, and write about the organization of space in our society. We will look at cities as different as Los Angeles and Detroit as well as the vast expanses of suburbia in between. We will also look at bounded spaces such as malls, amusement parks, museums, universities, and typical, suburban homes. How does the organization of space affect our use of that space and our relationships with other people; conversely, how does space reflect the choices and priorities of our society? Are these spaces constructed to suit the needs and preferences of their users? While we will discuss some common principles of architecture and urban planning, this course will be an introduction. Specific or technical knowledge is not required for this course (nor should people expect to acquire these skills by enrolling). I value student participation greatly, so I strongly encourage students with an interest (rather than a background) in these questions to enroll. And remember, this is a writing course, so we will spend lots of time discussing how other people write about their surroundings. Students will also be asked to write about the places in which they work, live, and find recreational opportunities. Students with an interest in multi-media scholarship might find this course quite enjoyable. We will read essays and novels, watch films, examine paintings, visit museums, and even use the Internet to explore the problem of space and society. Course requirements include three 5-page papers with multiple drafts as well as journal writing, response papers, and peer critiques. Participation will comprise a substantial proportion of each student's grade, so those who enroll should expect to intelligently discuss the principles of reading and writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 202.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 204.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 205.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Section 206.

Prerequisites & Distribution: ECB writing assessment. (4). (Introductory Composition).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Maren Linett (mlinett@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How does writing sift through, represent, and distance itself from life? What value can storytelling and literature have in our own lives? This class will suggest various answers to these questions by studying texts in several genres and from several periods. Many of these works are self-conscious about these questions, and all of them demonstrate ways in which the author's emotional, aesthetic, and political commitments are translated by the imagination. We will read poetry by Gerard Manley Hopkins and T.S. Eliot; short stories from James Joyce's Dubliners; novels by Jane Austen, James Baldwin, and Jurek Becker; Shakespeare's play The Merchant of Venice; a memoir by Nuala O'Faolain; and a film adapted from the Jane Austen novel. By asking how these stories are told, this course will help students move past reading for the plot and learn to analyze those strategies of style, tone, word choice, metaphor, and structure that make written texts art. Requirements are careful attention to readings, active, committed participation, two short textual analyses (4-6 pp) and one in-class presentation done in small groups.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams and short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so). The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 201 The Twilight Zone Summer, 1999

Instructor(s): Josie Kearns (jakearns@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The popular television series The Twilight Zone, the brainchild of Rod Serling, is a springboard for discussion of several themes, not the least of which are: 1) the nature of evil; 2) time or the past; 3) the individual and society; 4) appearances and "truth". 5) science and the individual; 6) perspectives on fantasy/magic realism. The second way to explore these themes is through an examination of literature based on the same themes or similar themes. For example, at the start of the course, we will examine views of the devil (and evil, man's relationship to it) in literature and in the series. The Devil and Daniel Webster (published in 1937) is an example of early twentieth-century literature which harkens back to the nineteenth century's Young Goodman Brown (1870) which also has elements quite similar, as will be seen with Stephen King's (The New Yorker, 1994) The Man in the Black Suit. These similarities and differences will be explored as related to two television episodes: The Howling Man and Printer's Devil. Sometimes, there is a correlation between the techniques used by the writer and the camera techniques in some of the series episodes, and this connection will be explored as well. A good example occurs in The Howling Man; in fact, a "Hitchcock" camera angle is used for times when well, you'll see. Be prepared to notice the camera angle as well as framing techniques in that episode and others.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 202 Exploring the Essay

Instructor(s): Sondra Smith (sonsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Writing is about communicating meaning not only with someone else (your reader), but also with yourself. Sometimes we don't know what we know until we begin to write; other times, writing opens up avenues of meaning we didn't realize existed. This section of English 325 will build on essay-writing skills you have already acquired while challenging you to communicate in ways you may not have tried before. We will expand our conception of what constitutes an essay by experimenting with formats such as the multi-genre essay and collaborative text, which can often communicate ideas not easily captured by the traditional academic essay. The course is designed to allow students to explore areas of their own interest and set individual writing goals.

The course load consists of three essays with revisions (5-12 pages long), an end-of-term portfolio gathering your best work, several shorter written exercises, and critiques of peers' writing. At least one essay will require research. The class will be run as a discussion and workshop, so attendance is mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 201 Class and Money in American Fiction. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIB).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore the interrelationships of class and money in some American fiction. These will range from the rags-to-riches success formula of Horatio Alger's Ragged Dick to (maybe) Tom Wolfe's satire of the glitzy 1980s, Bonfire of the Vanities. In between we will read Jack London's Martin Eden, Theodore Dreiser's Sister Carrie, Edith Wharton's The House of Mirth, Fitzgerald's The Great Gatsby, John Steinbeck's The Grapes of Wrath, and Philip Roth's Goodbye, Columbus. There will be a final exam and short daily writing assignments. This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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