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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

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Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for History of Art.


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 375. Art of the 60's.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kimberly Paice (kapaice@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/sp-su99/ha375-101.html

This course addresses American art of the 1960s and its intersections with archaeology, dance, film, linguistics, philosophy, and music. Beginning with Andy Warhol's Pop art, which blurred lines between commodity culture and high art, we will consider the emptying of modernist notions of originality and expressiveness from art. Minimal art will lead us to consider factory fabrication of art, the removal of the sculptural base, and the phenomenological experience of the work in real space and time. In the course we will also confront the matter of "process" in art and criticism of the decade, which linked ideational and physical procedures in artmaking. Lucy Lippard's Six Years: The Dematerialization of the Art Object, and writings by artists Mel Bochner, Donald Judd, Robert Morris, Yvonne Rainer, and Robert Smithson will constitute primary readings. Requirements of the course will also include one 6-8 page paper and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 2

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 101 Masterworks of Visual Narrative in the Middle Ages. (2 credits)

Instructor(s): K. Ambrose (kiefer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/sp-su99/ha394-101.html

This course examines visual narratives on a monumental scale, from the bronze doors of Hildesheim to the stained glass and stone sculpture of the great cathedrals of Chartres and Notre Dame in Paris. The course begins with a consideration of theories of narratology. What does it mean to tell a story without words? How do viewers participate with these narratives? To answer these questions, the course will make a number of intensive case studies. The specific social, political, and spiritual contexts of these works will be brought to bear upon analysis. Throughout, the distinct possibilities of media nincluding bronze, fresco, mosaic, and stone as conveyers of meaning will be explored. The goal will be to gain a deeper understanding of the narrative strategies of medieval artists.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

No Description Provided.

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Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for History of Art.


Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

No Description Provided.

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Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for History of Art.

Hist. Art 284. Introduction to Asian Painting.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): R Hammers (rhammers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/sp-su99/ha284-201.html

This course offers an introduction to the variety of forms and range of representational and expressive means encountered among the religious and secular painting of India, China, and Japan. Students will learn how to understand the iconography and imagery of select masterworks in a variety of genres, ranging from Buddhist religious murals to Japanese Ukiyoe prints to the monumental landscape paintings of China. The course will emphasize the historical and cultural contexts in which the works were produced. In addition, students will be introduced to the significance of shifts in iconography within traditions, and to possible motivations for differing visual interpretations of comparable themes across cultures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 201 Gender and Visual Culture of Paris and Berlin in the 1920s. Meets With Women's Studies 483.201

Instructor(s): E Otto (ottoe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart/sp-su99/ha394-201.html

The "new woman" has served as an important focal point for both art historical and gender studies of metropolitan France and Germany of the 1920s. This female figure is cast in roles ranging from the mannish lesbian of fashion to the inconsequential shop girl/consumer. But discussion of the role of women artists in constructing images of the new woman has often been missing from these investigations of this female type. In both Paris and Berlin, there were numbers of new women who were responding to their cultural context and producing images of their experiences of modernity.

This course will examine gender issues in the visual culture of Berlin and Paris in the 1920s. In the first half of the course, we will consider the many ways in which the new woman functioned as a symbol of modernity in these two cultural capitals, and the manners in which women negotiated and contributed to the the images of contemporary femininity in popular culture, film, and art. The second half of the course will be devoted to investigations of the significant contributions to visual culture made by women artists who were, in various ways, new women. Thus this course will also offer an introduction to such avant-garde movements as Cubism, Surrealism, Dada, and the Bauhaus through the focus on the work of women artists of the 1920s.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


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