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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Political Science.


Poli. Sci. 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Steven Mazie (mazie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An overview of some classic texts of political thought, including those of Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Rousseau, Burke, Mill and Marx. We will explore and evaluate these theorists' answers to questions such as: What's the point of politics? What makes state power legitimate? What is the proper relation between the individual and the state? What's appealing and what's lamentable about democracy? The course will include both lectures and discussions each week.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Michael Sherman (mjsherma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines a wide range of topics related to politics and government in the United States, beginning with an examination of the theoretical frameworks of American government, with an emphasis on the Constitution. The course will then examine how various actors, institutions, and groups play a role in the system, and how they affect outcomes and policy formation. We will pay particular attention to how the rules of the system and the ability to change (or not change) these rules shapes outcomes. In particular, the course will examine how the relatively unique structure of the American system from its method of choosing leaders to its justice system has influenced the country's development.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Denise De Garmo (pscden@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What role does a country's history, geography, culture, and economy have on the evolution of its political order? Do differences in these characteristics lead to variations in political institutions, political behavior, and governmental type across nations? Answers to these questions are central to the study of comparative politics. This course will attempt to answer these questions by familiarizing students with the core concepts and theoretical and methodological approaches to the study of comparative politics. Utilizing these concepts and approaches, we will examine particular features of political systems and patterns in a cross national analysis of countries and regions of the world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 411. American Political Processes.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Nicholas Winter (nwinter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine public opinion and assess its place in the American political system. The course will emphasize both how citizens' thinking about politics is shaped, and the effects public opinion has on political campaigns, elections and government. The course will examine research on the current state of public opinion. Throughout the course we will also discuss historical developments in opinion and its place in politics, including changes that arose with the development of polling and with the advent of television and other electronic media. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 413. American Constitutional Politics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Luis Fuentes-Rohwer (lfr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will take you on an introductory journey through the field of American Constitutional law. In so doing, we will spend our time paying close attention to the Constitution and the system of government it sought to establish. Keep in mind that while this is neither a history course nor a class on current affairs, these two perspectives will often enhance our discussions, as they will present interesting angles and links to the weekly materials. Three overarching questions will drive the first part of the course: (1) What is the (and in some important respects, a) Constitution; (2) How do conscientious political actors go about interpreting its mandates, some of which are hopelessly indeterminate; and (3) Who is entrusted with ultimate interpretive authority? In the second part of the course, we will reflect on these larger constitutional themes as we examine specific textual examples of our fundamental law. Some of the topics we will cover include: separation of powers; federalism; congressional and executive powers and their implied limits; judicial review; fundamental rights; and the substantive components of both the Due Process and Equal Protection Clause.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 447/Rel. 447. Comparative Studies in Religion and Politics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Price

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course takes a survey approach to understanding some of the major linkages between religion and religious actor to politics. The course will sample readings from the US, Latin America, and the Middle East with a goal toward understanding some of the major trends in the increased role of religion throughout the world since the 1970's. There will be a large focus on the historical origins of fundamentalism and moving beyond media images to tie together the commonalities between "fundamenatalist" movements globally.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 472. International Security Affairs.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Raymond Tanter (rtanter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($30) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Documents.center/frames/ps472fr.html

The course focuses on the process by which officials make national security decisions, and it introduces complementary explanations of national security affairs, including rational choice, bounded rationality, and prospect theory. In the forest of East-West politics, the West slew a dying Soviet bear. Thereafter, the United States perceives itself in a jungle teeming with additional beasts fresh threats to the Washington-dominated post-Cold War world. Viewed through an American prism, they are the rogue elephants of the international system. Students should have taken an introductory course in international politics, such as PoliSci 160. There are a midterm and final paper. Students will be evaluated regarding the quality and quantity of their participation in a computer conference Conferencing on the Web, (COW). The course meets at a computer site in order to access the Internet.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course can also be elected as an independent study with any of the department's faculty, and students must contact faculty members directly and work out course requirements before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Political Science.


Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Political Science.

Poli. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Volker Krause (vkrause@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A key objective of this course is to introduce students to concepts, ideas, and debates that are central to the study of world politics. To this end, Political Science 160 will be divided into four parts. Part One will describe the global political system in terms of its evolution, characteristics, as well as state and non-state actors. Part Two will identify structural, strategic, state-level, and domestic political sources of foreign policy behavior. Part Three will consider military, economic, and diplomatic influence techniques that states rely on to affect one another's foreign policies. Part Four will address the emergence and management of conflict and cooperation in the global political system. Throughout all four parts of the course, theoretical approaches will be evaluated against historical examples and empirical evidence. Students are expected to write a policy paper, take two closed-book in-class examinations (one midterm and one final), and participate regularly and actively in all class discussions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 361. Current Issues in World Politics.

Section 201 Jewish Politics. (3 credits). Meets With Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies 291.201

Instructor(s): Jeremey Shine (jshine@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl).

Credits: (1-4; 2-4 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Hebrew and Jewish Cultural Studies 291.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Poli. Sci. 401. Development of Political Thought: Modern and Recent.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Eric Kos (ekos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing or two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will trace certain themes that define the modern political perspective. In modern political theory the self-regulating individual is the starting point for visualizing political order. Much of modern political thought begins from the premise that individuals have rights antecedent to government, that no one is, either by nature or by divine appointment, in a position of political authority. Specifically, we will be concerned with questions of liberty, equality, political obligation, the individual, and the community. Each of the writers we shall read share the view that the purpose of politics is to secure freedom, but they differ sharply over what counts as genuine human freedom, both from each other and from more ancient political thinkers. In examining these thinkers, from the 16th century onward, we shall be examining and making explicit our own political assumptions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): John Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Legal Process will examine a host of different issues pertaining to legal theory and legal organizations. Among them, we'll ask: (1) What is the difference between law and politics and why is that distinction worth investigating? Is politics simply an arena where the most powerful person wins whereas law exists to uncover truth? (2) How can one justify the law, in all its myriad manifestations, as autonomous and "logical"? What are the implicit assumptions in these theories that allow them to justify the authority and autonomy of law? By exposing these latent assumptions, can we still view law, in principle, as impartial and infallible? (3) Is law really neutral with regard to the identities of members in society, or does it reflect the individual interests of certain groups? Do the theoretical underpinnings of law affect the marginal members of society the same way as the powerful? (4) Does law differ from morality? If so, what's at stake in such a distinction? That is, what do we gain and lose as a matter of theory by thinking of the two as different? Can judges ever refrain from introducing their own personal morality into their decision-making process? We'll read court cases, articles, and a few books as we embark on our journey to answer these questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 440. Comparative Politics.

Section 201 The Politics of Canada

Instructor(s): Frederick Cutler (egerton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science or upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://csd.queensu.ca/cutler/440/

This course is a wide-ranging introduction to the society and politics of Canada. Topics covered will include political identities, bilingualism and the place of Quebec, the Constitution, Parliament and the Cabinet, Canadian federalism, public policy, political parties and elections, and Canadian foreign policy. Much of the material will emphasize Canada's particularity. However, the aim of the course will be to illuminate general issues in the study of government and politics by comparing Canada's social and political institutions with those of other countries. Canada's historical attachments to Britain and current position vis-à-vis the US make those two countries the focus of our comparative study. Canada-U.S. relations will be given special attention in the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 492. Directed Studies.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section The Bentley Seminar for Public Service. Class to Take Place in Washington, D.C. Dates to Be Announced. (3 Credits)

Instructor(s): Meizlish

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course offers students with summer internships in Washington the opportunity to build on their internship experiences to gain UM course credit. The class will combine students' internship experiences with reading scholarly research on American government and politics. Our goals will be to discover how well the political science literature describes the "real world" of American government, and to discuss what hands-on experience with the world of politics can add to this scholarly work. Requirements: Basic knowledge of American government and permission of the instructor. The class is limited to 15 students and admission will be on a first-come/first-served basis. The course meets in Washington D.C.

(Generic) This course can also be elected as an independent study with any of the department's faculty, and students must contact faculty members directly and work out course requirements before enrolling.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3

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