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Spring/Summer '99 Course Guide

Courses in Sociology (Division 482)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 1999 (May 3 June 22, 1999)
Spring/Summer Term, 1999 (May 3 August 17, 1999)
Summer Half-Term, 1999 (June 28 August 17, 1999)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Sociology.


Soc. 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Section 101 Social Problems

Instructor(s): Genie Deerman (calmex@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course invites students to investigate a "social problem" and its impact on society. Empirical studies of specific issues will serve as the springboard for students to choose a social problem, evaluate its presentation in the popular press, and analyze its social significance. We will critically examine how race, class, and gender shape our understanding of social problems and their proposed solutions. How is the problem defined? And by whom? Do the "solutions" reflect particular interests? Additionally, we will work to understand how and why certain problems repeatedly come up on the public agenda. Student understanding of the concepts, theories, and substantive material of the course will be demonstrated by constructing a "social problem file." This file lays the foundation for the final paper and encourages careful development of a sociological argument. A midterm is also required. The course is organized around the premise that we learn best through interaction with others. Small group discussions form the core of this course and will allow us to discuss various perspectives. Students will share their written work with each other and will both offer and receive feedback from other students.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Mary Noonan (mnoonan@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The objective of this course is to introduce students to three important aspects of statistics.

  1. Data collection: the methods through which researchers gather data, such as opinion polls, surveys, experiments, and sampling.
  2. Data description: graphical and numerical procedures for summarizing and describing a data set.
  3. Data analysis: using data to make decisions, predictions, and draw inferences.

Problem sets will be designed to provide experience working with data and interpreting statistical procedures and results. Computers will be used for some assignments, but prior experience with computers is not necessary. No prior exposure to statistics or mathematics, aside from arithmetic and basic algebra, is assumed. Grading will be based on three exams and problem sets. The class time will be divided between lectures and laboratory sessions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Chavella Pittman (cpittman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the socio-historical experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. We will explore theories which will help us understand the structurally patterned history of these groups. The course will also focus on micro-level explanations of race and ethnic relations. These structural and social psychological theories will aid us in understanding the current state of race and ethnic relations and inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 101 Contact Project Community for Further Info.: http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/Proj_community

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/

Sociology 389 is known as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine 4 to 8 hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Over 35 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, and mentoring situations; in adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; and with the homeless, elderly, mentally ill, developmentally disabled, and in hospitals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 447/WS 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Susan Chimonas (chimonas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines women's and men's lives, gender, and sexuality. We will take a sociological approach to these subjects, emphasizing social patterns and how they are created and perpetuated. We will begin with the assumption that biology is a problematic basis for making statements about gender or sexuality and examine the relationship betwen biology and culture. We will also study relationships among women; the social construction of sexuality, femininity, and masculinity; and the interfaces between gender, the economy, and the State. Students will write six weekly 5-7 page papers and complete midterm and final exams. Discussion and participation are mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 460. Social Change.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Chandan Gowda (cgowda@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will begin this course by contextualizing the emergence of "social change" as an object of intellectual inquiry. Some of the writings of early modern social theorists like Marx, Weber, and Simmel and of recent social theorists like Foucault will occupy us in the early stages of this course. In the remaining classes, we will engage with processes of worldwide social transformations such as colonialism and the emergence of national states. Debates around the issues of modernization, development, and underdevelopment will also engage our attention in this part of the course. Lastly, this course will deal with what is now popularly referred to as "globalization" and its impact on contemporary social relationships. Here, we will read theorists, among others, like Wallerstein, David Harvey, and Arjun Appadurai. Depending on the interest of the students, we might also briefly examine some important issues surrounding postmodernism. This course mainly intends to expose students to some of the critical issues involved in the study of "social change." Since this course is discussion oriented students will be expected to actively participate in classroom discussion and make an in-class presentation. Grading procedures and course paper requirements will be discussed in the introductory class.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 465/Psych. 488. Sociological Analysis of Deviant Behavior.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Wright

Prerequisites & Distribution: Introductory sociology or introductory psychology as a social science. (3). (SS).

No Description Provided.

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Soc. 475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Tasleem Padamsee-Garrett (tjpadams@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, illness, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, and the current health care crisis in national and cross-cultural perspective.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '99 Time Schedule for Sociology.


Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section Students Should Go to 2205 Michigan to Obtain Override

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology 389 is known as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine 4 to 8 hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Over 35 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, and mentoring situations; in adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; and with the homeless, elderly, mentally ill, developmentally disabled, and in hospitals.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '99 Time Schedule for Sociology.

Soc. 100. Principles of Sociology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Greene

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Naomi Galtz (ngaltz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Class conflict...Social coercion...Global economics. This course begins with the idea that all the "big processes" of society are present in our daily lives in the objects we touch, the clothes we wear, in the way stores and houses and classrooms are arranged. We'll explore the forces that shape the landscape of everyday life, and we will try to locate ourselves in the flow of social processes: Do we move through our lives like sleepwalkers, negotiating society in a haze? Do we live like craftspeople, consciously shaping society through our actions? Do we behave like pawns on a chessboard being forced to play out a game we aren't even aware of?

In order to begin probing these issues, we will study several important perspectives on social reality and the meaning of everyday life, based on marxism, phenomenology, feminism, post-modernism. A major goal of the course is to learn how to read the work of important contemporary social thinkers, get meaning from them, and even enjoy them. We'll also perform several short exercises, in and out of class, dedicated to testing, interpreting and re-thinking daily reality.

You will be graded on participation, completion of short exercises, and two writing assignments (3-5 pp and 7-12 pp). Prior experience with sociology or social philosophy will be helpful but is not mandatory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Erika Austin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course prior to their last term. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 265, 311, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 303/CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Rochelle Woods (rwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The goal of this course is to introduce students to the social history (past and present) of racial minorities in the United States. We will begin by defining the principal concepts that sociologists use in their analysis of race relations. Central to this discussion will be the understanding of "racism" NOT as "prejudice," "ignorance," an "attitude," or a "set of beliefs" but rather as a comprehensive historical system that changes over time. After this theoretical discussion, we will survey the historical experiences of five racial minorities, namely, African Americans, Chicanos/Mexican Americans, American Indians, and Asian Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 304/Amer. Cult. 304. American Immigration.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Dickerson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section Contact Project Community for Further Info. http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/Proj_community

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($22) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($22) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~ocsl/

Sociology 389 is know as "Project Community" and "Trained Volunteer Corps." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Over 40 sections offer settings that include working in school classrooms with "at-risk" children and youth in a variety of tutoring, chemical dependency, mentoring situations; in the adult and juvenile criminal justice system; with adult literacy; with the homeless; and with elderly, the mentally ill, the disabled, and in hospitals. For more information, contact Project Community, 1024 Hill Street, 763-3548. Enrollment is by override only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit in the same or different terms.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 467. Juvenile Delinquency.

Section 201 Meets with Psychology 581.201

Instructor(s): Martin Gold

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Soc. 468. Criminology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Sabrina Tyuse (tyuse@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course presents an overview of major criminological topics such as the historical perspectives of crime, the measurement of crime, the social construction of crime, how race and class shape the criminal justice system, why people commit crime, and an evaluation of criminal justice policies. We will learn more about these issues through the use of lectures, guest speakers, debate of readings, analysis of crime statistics, and films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Soc. 475/MCO 475 (Public Health). Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): M. Murphy

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore social aspects of health, illness, and the health care system in American society. We will examine such issues as the social causation of disease, the social construction of medical knowledge, relationships between doctors and patients, the health professions, health care among women and the poor, and the current health care crisis, including the social study of HIV.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

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