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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in American Culture (Division 315)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

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This page was created at 2:41 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for American Culture.

To see what has been added or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Spring Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.


Amer. Cult. 201. American Values.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kristin Hass (kah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to explore a set of linked but distinct core "American Values," those ideas that have acted as foundational notions and that continue to be reflected in emergent ideas of what "America" and "Americans" are about. It does this by examining the various ways Americans of different races, ethnicities, classes, genders, and religions, living in different time periods and regions, and under specific historical conditions, have formulated, understood, championed, transformed, and contested these values. Drawing on interdisciplinary sources and methods and framed by multicultural and feminist theoretical approaches, the course will offer students the opportunities to explore their own relationships to these historically-core American values and will encourage them to articulate their own understandings of them through a variety of in-class and take-home group and individual assignments. As a 200-level survey, it is intended to offer students a broad-based understanding of the place of these core values in American society and to help them understand historical relationships between them, rather than focusing in depth on any one set of values, only one time period, or only one approach. The materials for the course encompass a wide range of primary and secondary sources from every period in American history and from across a number of textual, visual, and audio genres.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 101 The Cultural Politics of Play: Leisure in American Culture.

Instructor(s): Macedo Pool (mtmpool@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What do you and your friends do for fun? How do you spend your free time? Is recreation just play, or does it tell us more about the society and culture in which we live? In this course we will critically examine historical and contemporary leisure sites and practices, including sports, tourism, fairs, television, video games, movies, amusement parks, malls, and museums. We will explore the ways in which American leisure practices have stayed the same and changed throughout the twentieth century. We will consider the social and political consequences of leisure experiences, and to this end, we will think about how participating in particular leisure activities teaches us certain cultural lessons on a variety of topics, including how to be a "proper" citizen, man, woman, or worker. The course reading list is interdisciplinary, drawing from cultural history, anthropology, and communication studies, and we will primarily deploy a cultural studies framework to guide our inquiry. This means that we will, first, pay particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender as they intersect with cultural practices. Second, it means we will think about how certain leisure activities serve as a means of maintaining or legitimating power differences as well as how they might serve as a means of contesting or challenging those power differences. At least one field trip-to Henry Ford Museum-is scheduled and, depending upon time and budgetary constraints, we may also be able to "research" other leisure activities as a class throughout the term. Required texts will include John Kasson, Amusing the Million: Coney Island at the Turn of the Century; Kathy Peiss, Cheap Amusements: Working Women and Leisure in Turn-of-the-Century New York; Justine Cassell and Henry Jenkins, From Barbie to Mortal Kombat: Gender and Computer Games; Susan Davis, Spectacular Nature: Corporate Culture and the Sea World Experience; and a course pack of articles. Course assignments include a midterm, final, and quizzes. This is a combination lecture and discussion class, so students will also be graded on attendance and participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 102 Detroit The Engine of the American Dream.

Instructor(s): Catherine Daligga (cdaligga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Never the financial, political, or artistic capital of the U.S., Detroit has become the Rodney Dangerfield of American cities ever struggling, ever discounted. But as the Motor City, the automobile capital of the world, Detroit and its central industry have changed the world in ways far beyond what Henry Ford and his competitors could have envisioned at the beginning of the 20th century. From the start, the manufacture, marketing and mass ownership of the automobile have depended on and reinforced three major American ideals: individualism, consumerism, and their corollary, continual self-invention. In this half-semester seminar, we will examine a few of the ways by which the automobile has transformed American society, from suburban sprawl and central city decline to the automotive fantasies of advertising, movies, and popular music, keeping Detroit as the constant point of reference. Course material will include readings in history, journalism, urban and cultural studies, fiction and poetry, and the movies and music of the road. In addition to a course pack, required texts may include a book or two, perhaps AfterCulture by Jerry Herron, and Redevelopment and Race by June Manning Thomas; reading requirements will average 60 pages per week. The class will also make at least one non-traditional tour of the city, hence the lab fee. Students will keep a weekly journal of assigned topics (e.g., an automotive autobiography), take a mid-term exam, and write several short response papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 214. Introduction to Asian American Studies Social Science.

Section 101 Asian Americans in Popular Culture.

Instructor(s): Grace Wang (wangg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Enter the Dragon. Mississippi Masala. Wu Tang Clan. The Cheat. How have media images of Asians and Asian Americans changed over the last century? This course focuses on popular representations by and about Asian Americans in film, television, advertisements, magazines, news coverage and music. Looking at an eclectic set of materials ranging from kung fu films to sports figures, this course looks at the construction of Asian American identities through the media and the impact of popular images of Asia on American culture. By exploring a number of key themes, the course will examine how stereotypes are reinforced and/or resisted in different media sites. The course will also engage several broader questions: What role does popular culture play in mediating racial identities? What is the relationship between popular culture and politics? What links can be made between media portrayals of Asian Americans and other U.S. minority groups? Themes the class will engage include the influence of martial arts and Hong Kong imagery, differences between mainstream and alternative media, Hong Kong imagery, differences between mainstream and alternative media, racial representation in advertising, the model minority myth, interethnic representations, and war-time images. We will be investigating films such as Enter the Dragon, Yellow, Mississippi Masala, Rush Hour and The Cheat; music by Wu Tang Clan, Foxy Brown, the Mountain Brothers and others; documentaries such as History and Memory, I'm on a Mission from Buddha and The Bhangra Wrap; selections from alternative presses such as Yolk, A. Magazine, and Flip; and articles from leading media scholars. Class time will be divided between lecture, discussion, and the viewing of films, documentaries and visual images. Students need not have a background in media or ethnic studies.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 101 Bodies in Science Fiction & Popular Culture 1950-2050: The Future of the Human. (3 credits). Meets with History of Art 394.102.

Instructor(s): Sandra Seekins

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History of Art 394.012.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 102 Migrant Workers. (2 credits). Spring Term Enrollment Required for Participation. Meets with American Culture 601.101, RC 205, 305, 405.025. Must Have Knowledge of Spanish or P/I.

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a unique opportunity for students to explore the issues affecting the migrant community and to experience the reality of life in a linguistic and ethnic minority setting. It will enhance student understanding of the lives of migrant farmworkers and their families, with an emphasis on health issues, as well as cultural and community strengths. The subject matter will be approached interactively as students read, discuss and listen to invited speakers during the seminars.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 101 Practicum in the Multicultural Community. Meets with Psych. 305.101. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (loraineg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an experiential field course involving two visits per week to an African-American, Arab-American, or Latino community in Detroit. Students will be assigned to work with community-based organizations on projects to improve the well being of children and families. Projects involve such activities as tutoring, developing outreach activities, assisting in child care settings, and working in community education projects. Internships will be supervised by the instructor and program staff. Transportation will be provided. Students will also attend a seminar meeting once a week to integrate theory with practice.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 102 Working with Women in Prison and their Children. (3-4 Credits?). Meets with Psychology 305.103.

Instructor(s): Christina Jose-Kampfner (carino@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 305.103.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 340/CAAS 340. A History of Blacks in American Film.

Section 101 The African American Cinematic Experience.

Instructor(s): Melba Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Afroamerican and African Studies 340.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1


Amer. Cult. 342/Hist. 368/WS 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See History 368.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. This is a two-term course with 3 hours of credit each term; a grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for American Culture.

Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for American Culture.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in American Culture this week go to What's New This Week.


Unless otherwise stated, the permission required for the repetition for credit of specifically designated courses is that of the student's concentration or BGS advisor.


Amer. Cult. 100. What is an American?

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Daligga

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How have different Americans imagined what it means to be American? What ideas about national history, patriotism, and moral character shape their visions of Americanness? How do they draw the boundaries that define who belongs within the nation and who gets excluded? This course will study some of the answers that Americans have given to these questions in both the past and present. Our assumption will be that there is no "right" answer to the question, "What is an American?" just ongoing political and cultural debate. We will study that debate in a wide array of materials: journalism, memoirs, film, fiction, political manifestoes, historical research, and World Wide Web sites. We will look at many conflicting visions of America including some that are disturbingly exclusionary and we will pay close attention to the ways that Americans have thought about the value and challenges of diversity (racial, ethnic, regional, religious, and other) in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 201 Reel Justice: Law & Order in American Film.

Instructor(s): Tom Romero (romeroii@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Big screen depictions of law and order have occupied the imagination of filmmakers and audiences from the beginning of the industry. From the redemptive vigilante justice found in Birth of a Nation to the routine courtroom drama found in recent movies such as the Rainmaker, films have left a vivid cultural heritage and a vital historical link to understanding the American legal system and its participants during the twentieth century. Yet, films do not just serve as a prism into the inner working of the contemporary legal system. Building upon class, race, and gender mythologies of the time, popular discourses about justice in the United States have been and continue to be shaped by images and perspectives from Hollywood.

This interdisciplinary summer term course will introduce students to the relationship between law, film, and the American legal imagination. In particular, we will assess The Man Who Shot Liberty Valence, Colors, To Kill a Mockingbird, The Ballad of Gregorio Cortez, It's a Wonderful Life, Fatal Attraction, and Blade Runner to investigate how Americans have come to understand concepts such as justice, the "rule of law," freedom, citizenship, affirmative action, and sexual harassment. In addition to the movies, our texts will include court cases, statutes, law review articles, and scholarship on film. We will meet three times a week. Mondays will be devoted to lecture, Tuesdays we will watch the film, and Wednesdays we shall discuss that week's film, readings, and concepts in a seminar type format. Comparative and relational in scope, the films, lectures, reading and discussions will give students the opportunity to evaluate critically how concepts of justice are shaped by the larger culture. By the end of the summer, each student should have a more sophisticated understanding about the extent that "reel" justice on the big screen accurately depicts and concomitantly shapes conceptions of law and order in the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 212. Introduction to Latino Studies Social Science.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Adrian Burgos (aburgos@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The "Latin Explosion" in music and sports has mesmerized the nation the past two years. The sounds of Ricky Martin, Jennifer López, and Marc Anthony have reverberated not just through the Latino quarters but have flowed profusely from the homes of the Anglo mainstream. At the baseball diamond, the heroics of Slammin" Sammy Sosa and Orlando "El Duque" Hernández have been at the center of the media coverage. The abilities and dynamic personalities of these figures has captured the hearts of Americans and, just as significant, the imaginations of advertising and pop culture industry, leading to the opening of "new" commercial markets and wider exposure of American goods. The popular images of Latinos circulated within the mainstream, however, have tended to represent Latinos as recent arrivals, crossovers, and exotic foreigners, regardless of national origins or citizenship status of the individual. A discussion-driven class, this course introduces students to the ambivalent position Latinos have often occupied in the U.S. as citizens, laborers, and cultural practitioners by highlighting the historical relationship between the United States and the Spanish-speaking Americas. Course readings on labor, colonialism, cultural citizenship, popular culture (music and baseball), and social movements will offer insights into the transnational dimensions of Latino everyday life and culture. Assigned readings such as George Sánchez, Becoming Mexican-American, George Lipsitz" Dangerous Crossroads, and Michel-Rolph Trouillot's Silencing the Past, and other course materials challenge students to rethink what constitutes American identity, citizenship, and the nation. Student's assignments will include leading discussions by as class facilitators and writing three response papers (two-three pages), a midterm essay (6-8 pages), and a final paper (10-12 pages).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 240/WS 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 301. Topics in American Culture.

Section 201 Migrant Camp Visits Practicum. (2 credits). Students Must Have Taken American Culture 301.102 or American Culture 601.101 Spring Half Term to Participate or Have P/I. Must Have Knowledge of Spanish. Meets with American Culture 601.201, RC Core 209, 309, or 409, Sec. 025

Instructor(s): Maria Rodriguez (mrodri@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course provides a unique opportunity for students to explore the issues affecting the migrant community and to experience the reality of life in a linguistic and ethnic minority setting. Parting from information presented and discussed during the class seminar, students are expected to present information to farmworkers in a number of migrant camps, and subsequently write critical journals linking academic matter with their own experiences. Spring Term is a prerequisite.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 201 Practicum in the Multicultural Community. (3 credits). Meets with Psychology 305.201.

Instructor(s): Lorraine Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 305.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4


Amer. Cult. 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 388. Field Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field experience in organizations, institutions, and service agencies under such University of Michigan programs as the Washington and New York Internship Program and Project Community. Students must make individual arrangements with these programs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Amer. Cult. 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. This is a two-term course with 3 hours of credit each term; a grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


This page was created at 2:41 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


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