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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in Cultural Anthropology (Division 319)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 – June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 – August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 – August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


This page was created at 2:41 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

To see what has been added or changed in Cultural Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Spring Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Anthro. 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and globalization. Required readings may include an introductory text and various paperbacks. Lectures and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1,3,4

Anthro. 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 – Hunters-Gatherers of the Past and Present.

Instructor(s): Elizabeth Sobel (lizsobel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Hunter-gatherers are people who subsist by hunting, gathering, and fishing–they do not farm for a living. In both pop culture and scientific research, hunter-gatherers have been mythologized as ape-like relics of the "stone age." In this course we will use recent anthropological studies to examine and challenge such stereotypes of hunter-gatherers. Through both ethnographic and archaeological research, we will critically evaluate tradional misconceptions of hunter-gatherer food-ways, land-use, technology, gender roles, social organization, and political organization in the past and the present.

Class time will include discussion, lecture, films, and hands-on lab projects. Some class activities, such as a stone tool-making lab, will be held outside.

Grades are based on class attendance, participation, and 6 short projects. One project is due each week for 6 weeks. Each project is a three page paper about a topic covered that week in lecture, discussion, lab and readings.

Class attendance, preparation and participation 30%.

Projects: (5 projects x 12%), ) + (1 project x 10%) 70%.

Materials: a course-pact of readings for class discussion and projects.

Syllabi available at Anthropology Dept. (1st floor of LSA) or contact instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 – Anthropology of House and Home.

Instructor(s): Martha Baker (mgbaker@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ideas of house and home influence everyday life in diverse and unexpected ways. From the domestic arts of Martha Stewart, to pulsating rythms of "house music," notions of HOUSE and HOME have become a pervasive, but seldom thought about facet of contemporary American life. This broad range of meanings... of the shapes, figures and histories surrounding "home" wil be the focus of this course.

The Anthropology of House and Home, will give students a chance to explore diverse traditions of residential architecture and to reflect on how they shape the culture and politics of everyday life. The course entails an ethnographic adventure through housing styles and traditions in Malaysia, Algeria, and South Africa, as well as the United States and Europe to consider how processes of design, construction and decoration respond and relate to broader social processes.

Class meetings will entail short lectures, discussion films, and field trips to points of architectural interest. Course requirements will include a take-home essay exam, and a short project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Cultural Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.


Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Cultural Anthropology this week go to What's New This Week.


Anthro. 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 – The Archaeology of Death

Instructor(s): William Griffin (wdg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

From the Great Pyramids of Egypt, to the mummies of Peru, to the modern day reburial ceremonies of Madagascar, archaeologists have long focused on the treatment of the dead to learn about the structure of a society and the beliefs of a culture. This course will examine different aspects of mortuary analysis in archaeology, including the mortuary rituals of the earliest civilizations and some contemporary cultures that might serve as ethnographic analogies. We will also consider the ethics involved with mortuary research, the political debates over the control of such material remains, and the role of anthropologists and archaeologists in investigating recent genocides. Whatever the time period, archaeologists study death in part to bring the past alive, to teach us something about the living, and this course will survey the best of these attempts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 – The Anthropology of Sports: Images, Athletes & Games

Instructor(s): Elise Edwards (elisee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Athletic competitions and sports figures are incredibly popular and pervasive aspects of our modern world. As participants, spectators, and even critics, we typically think of sports as means of exercise and entertainment. This course will look at sports more closely and in new ways by approaching it as a topic of anthropological study. We will explore the multiple levels at which sport does its work:

  1. the cultural and political values behind the training of bodies (and minds) on practice fields and courts;
  2. the ritualistic and symbolic aspects of sporting events and spectacles; and
  3. the messages transmitted through media-produced images of sport.

We will look at the ways sport is idealized through images of strength, fitness, and self-improvement, as well as events such as the Olympics. In contrast, we will explore the role of sport as a potent political tool in the manipulation of power and perception.

We will begin by looking at some of the ways scholars have approached sporting practices anthropologically. The special qualities and characteristics of sport that lend it to particular cultural uses will be examined, and we will consider the social and cultural significance of sport in physical education curriculums, the Olympics, fan behavior, and the creation of celebrities. We will then investigate more specifically the ways sport is deployed to emphasize distinctions and differences along national, class, racial, ethnic, and gender lines. Sport is predominantly consumed in the form of visual images, from televised athletic competitions to print ads featuring athletes. Therefore, we will discuss general approaches to the reading of visual materials, and will compare the ways scholars have interpreted the images, physical displays, and spectacles of sport. As a class, we will pursue several visual exercises with both print and video images. Several (documentary and feature) films about sport will be shown and discussed in relation to the readings.

Requirements & Assignments: This course will be run as an undergraduate seminar. There will be weekly lectures on primary topics and concepts, however, an equal amount of class time will be devoted to discussion, short student presentations, and group activities. Attendance and participation is required. There will be short weekly assignments to encourage engagement with the readings and critical thinking about course topics (see syllabus for details). Students will be encouraged to watch and read about sports during the period of the course. Some assignments will involve bringing in an ad, newspaper article, video clip, or verbal account of an ad or event seen on TV that is relevant to that week's readings, and discuss it with the class. There will be a final project to be present in class along with a corresponding final paper (6-8 pgs.). No additional research or outside reading will be necessary to complete the final project. Instead, students will be encouraged to use the course materials provided in the course pack for their writing and presentations.

Prerequisites: none

Materials. All of the readings for the course will be compiled in a course pack. Syllabus and course pack will be available at Accu-Copy at least one week before the course begins.

Questions. If you have any further questions or concerns, please contact the instructor, Elise Edwards at: elisee@umich.edu.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 202 – The Anthropology of Religion & Healing

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The primary goal of this course is to introduce anthropological approaches dealing with religion and healing and to bridge the gap between what is often an analytical or technical divide. It will encourage analysis and reflection on students' own lives and cultural backgrounds by using material about different contexts in the United States. In addition to familiarizing students with the anthropology of religion and healing, the chief focus of this course is to enable and encourage students to think critically and analytically about a wide variety of topics. Therefore, I have designed the course so that students will regularly be applying the approaches with which they are becoming familiar.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Anthro. 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s): John Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (6). (Excl).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Provides undergraduate and graduate students with training in excavation, survey, and artifact analysis, while participating in ongoing research. The sites excavated are all Native American in origin. All lectures and mush of the training related to artifact and site interpretation stress Native American lifeways, symbolic and religious values.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, P/I

Anthro. 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

This page was created at 2:42 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


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