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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in Biology (Division 328)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

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This page was created at 2:43 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Biology.

To see what has been added or changed in Biology this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Spring Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Biol. 162. Introductory Biology.

Section 101 If a Section You Want is Filled, Place Your Name on the Waitlist in 1039 Chemistry, 764-1430. Students Must Reserve Monday Evenings for Exams. Exams Will be Given on May 15 and June 5. There Will Also be a Final Exam.

Instructor(s): Marc Ammerlaan (mcammer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in Chemistry 130. Biology 162 is not open to students who have completed Biol. 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

This is a one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of Biology 162 are (1) to provide factual and conceptual knowledge; (2) to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology; (3) to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and (4) to develop thinking and writing skills. Topics in Biology 162 are divided among four areas: (a) cellular and molecular biology; (b) genetics; (c) evolution; and (d) ecology.

Students MUST: (1) attend 3 two-hour lectures, 2 one-and-a-half hour discussions, and 2 three hour lab sections each week; (2) ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH WEDNESDAY DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and (3) RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling. Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, 1039 Chemistry Building (764-1430) or visit the course web page http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 5 Go to 1039 CHEM

Biol. 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques and working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 215. Spring Flora of Michigan.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 101.

Instructor(s): William Anderson (wra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152), 195, or 102. (3). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($65) required.

Credits: (3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($65) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this field-oriented course students will learn to sight-identify selected families, genera, and species of flowering plants common in Michigan during the spring. Conifers, ferns, and primitive vascular plants may also be covered. Students will learn to use keys for identification, a skill that will be useful anywhere the student goes in the future. Students will be expected to know the diagnostic characteristics of the plants learned, interpret structures of the vegetative body, flowers, fruits, and seeds, and learn some of the characteristics of exposure, soil moisture, and topography that help predict the occurrence of plant species in our area.

Classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays will consist of a lecture followed by a lab. On Wednesdays the whole afternoon will be devoted to a field trip to a local natural area. Grades will be based on several exams plus frequent quizzes in the lab and the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 225(325). Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture.

Anatomy, Physiology, and Development

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Richard Hume (rhume@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 and a year of chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 420. (3). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio225/bio225sp2000.htm

This course is an introduction to the physiological view of animals and emphasizes zoological rather than human aspects. The course is most appropriate for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore and junior years. The course uses evidence from different groups of organisms to identify the general principles of functional mechanisms. It also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. This course will use the same text as was used in Biology 162 in the previous semester.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 300. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of biology and 3.0 grade point average in science; permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended primarily for juniors, including Honors students, who wish to pursue independent research or study at an intermediate level in an area of biological science. The student may ask an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Biology to direct the research project and supervise related readings. The project may take the form of an investigation of new problems in the field or laboratory, a detailed investigation of primary sources (a literature survey), development of new procedures or programs, design of a classroom experiment, etc. A final paper is required and must be approved by the research advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 302. Teaching Experience for Undergraduates.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Undergraduates participating in this course are responsible for (1) aiding regularly assigned Graduate Student Instructors; (2) providing tutorial help for undergraduates enrolled in the course; (3) meeting regularly with discussion and laboratory sessions; and (4) participating with Graduate Student Instructors in instructional activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 305. Genetics.

Section 101 Exams Will be Given May 18, June 1, and June 19, 5:00 8:00 P.M.

Instructor(s): Santhadevi Jeyabalan (sjeyabal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152) or 195 and prior or concurrent enrollment in Chem. 210. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: gene transmission in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, linkage and recombination, gene expression, mutation and recombination, DNA and chromosomes, recombinant DNA, gene regulation, developmental genetics, and population genetics. There are six hours of lecture each week and two discussion sections of one-and-a-half hours each, directed by Graduate Student Instructors. The discussion sections introduce relevant new material, expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three exams covering lectures, discussions, reading assignments; exams include problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Nolta (nolta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152) or 195; and organic chemistry. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Biol. 311, Biol. Chem. 415, or Chem 451. (4). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio310/

Introductory Biochemistry is designed to be a general introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. This course will furnish basic information concerning the organization of chemical reactions in cells and will include information on the enzymes that catalyze these reactions as well as on the interactions between different pathways. Topics covered include: amino acid structure and nomenclature; protein structure and function; enzyme kinetics; nucleic acids; intermediary metabolism; photosynthesis; and regulation of metabolism.

This is a lecture-based course with supplementary discussion sections. There will be a web-based research project to be completed by students. More information about this can be obtained at http://www.umich.edu/~nolta.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Biol. 381. General Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711 This Course is Offered only at the Biological Station, May 21 June 16. Enrollment only By Permission of T. Crandell in the Biological Station Office, 1111 Nat. Sci.

Instructor(s): Heinen, Karowe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195; and a laboratory course in chemistry. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course studies the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms in nature. Course topics will focus on individual ecology (physiological ecology, foraging strategies), and population ecology (population dynamics, life history strategies, evolution, competition, herbivory, predation, and mutualism), and will also address community ecology and ecosystem ecology. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by field laboratory exercises designed to test ecological questions in a variety of terrestrial and aquatic habitats. Students will conduct group research projects and present their results in a symposium at the end of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 400. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 455. Ethnobotany.

Section 711 This Course is Offered only at the Biological Station, May 21 June 16. Enrollment only By Permission of T. Crandell in the Biological Station Office, 1111 Nat. Sci.

Instructor(s): Richard Ford (riford@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two college-level biology courses. (5). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Ethnobotany is the direct interaction between people and plants. Culturally, people name, classify, and use plants. Behaviorally, they collect, harvest, manipulate, and domesticate plants. Plants impose limitations on people because of their ecology, reproductive biology, population dynamics, physiology, anatomy, and biochemistry. Ethnobotany considers the human-plant equation as an integrated system. We will draw examples in lecture worldwide but concentrate on Native American cultures for our research problems and numerous field trips. In particular, we will consider their methods of plant management, critical aspects of indigenous knowledge for conservation and applied problems, and ethical issues of intellectual property rights as we explore the ethnobotany of particular cultures. Native Americans of Northern Michigan will be class guests.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for Biology.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Biology this week go to What's New This Week.


Biol. 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 300. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of biology and 3.0 grade point average in science; permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended primarily for juniors, including Honors students, who wish to pursue independent research or study at an intermediate level in an area of biological science. The student may ask an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Biology to direct the research project and supervise related readings. The project may take the form of an investigation of new problems in the field or laboratory, a detailed investigation of primary sources (a literature survey), development of new procedures or programs, design of a classroom experiment, etc. A final paper is required and must be approved by the research advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 400. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Biology.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Biology this week go to What's New This Week.


Biol. 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 300. Undergraduate Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Eight credits of biology and 3.0 grade point average in science; permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended primarily for juniors, including Honors students, who wish to pursue independent research or study at an intermediate level in an area of biological science. The student may ask an appropriate faculty member in the Department of Biology to direct the research project and supervise related readings. The project may take the form of an investigation of new problems in the field or laboratory, a detailed investigation of primary sources (a literature survey), development of new procedures or programs, design of a classroom experiment, etc. A final paper is required and must be approved by the research advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 302. Teaching Experience for Undergraduates.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). May not be included in any of the Biological Sciences concentration programs. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Undergraduates participating in this course are responsible for (1) aiding regularly assigned Graduate Student Instructors; (2) providing tutorial help for undergraduates enrolled in the course; (3) meeting regularly with discussion and laboratory sessions; and (4) participating with Graduate Student Instructors in instructional activities.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 330. Biology of Birds.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Cuthbert

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two collegiate courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to ornithology with emphasis on field identification of the birds of northern Michigan. Field trips are to a variety of habitats in the region. Labs include classification, morphology, and identification of study specimens. Lectures cover a variety of topics in the evolution, physiology, behavior, and ecology of birds. Each student participates in a group project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 381. General Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195; and a laboratory course in chemistry. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Biol. 381. General Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Jolls

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154) or 195; and a laboratory course in chemistry. (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Credits: (6 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course studies the factors influencing the distribution and abundance of animals and plants, including hypothesis testing, design, collection, analysis and interpretation of ecological data. Topics include individual ecology (abiotic and biotic limiting factors), population ecology (population dynamics, competition, predation, and other species interactions), community ecology (species diversity and succession), ecosystem ecology (nutrient cycling and energy flow), and human impacts on ecosystems. Lecture and discussion will be supplemented by field projects designed to test a variety of ecological questions in a range of terrestrial and aquatic communities. Students will conduct a research project at the end of the course. (ECB credit may be received for this course.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 390. Evolution.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Stephen Pruett-Jones

Prerequisites & Distribution: Biol. 162 (or 152-154). (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (4; 5 in the half-term in Ann Arbor; 5 at Biol. Station).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for students who wish to both learn about evolutionary biology and be exposed to the natural history of a region. Lectures will emphasize evolutionary theory as the explanation of observed organic diversity in the northern Michigan region. Field experiments will involve plants and animals, aquatic and terrestrial situations and utilize observational, experimental and statistical techniques. Numerous field trips will be taken to understand the importance of human modifications of the environment, biological diversity and differential survival of organisms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 400. Advanced Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: 12 credits of biology, 3.0 average in science, and permission of faculty member in biology. (1-3). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of 9 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Intended for those engaged in original research at an advanced level. This course number is most frequently elected by senior Honors students who have completed Biology 300 and who are completing their research and writing their thesis. A final paper is required. (Refer to the description of Biology 300 for more information.)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 431. Ecology of Animal Parasites.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Blankespoor

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Various ecological aspects of animal parasite populations will be studied including life cycles, species diversity, diel and seasonal periodicity, intra- and interspecific competition, host specificity, longevity, recruitment, pathology and parasite-induced behavioral changes in the host. Field and laboratory techniques for studying these host-parasite relationships will be emphasized.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 442. Biology of Insects.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Brian Scholtens

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any college-level biology course. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to entomology, emphasizing the diversity of insects, their life histories, ecology and behavior using the identification and natural history of the orders and major families of insects. Fieldwork will include trips to major habitats of the area for study and collection and short class projects on ecological and evolutionary questions. Laboratory work will include examining basic insect structure and preparation of individual collections. Lecture topics will include coverage of insect groups, evolution and phylogeny, ecology, behavior and physiology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 453. Field Mammalogy.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Philip Myers (pmyers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the study of mammals. Students will learn methods of studying mammals in the field by carrying out a series of projects on the wild mammals of northern Michigan. These projects will be designed to give familiarity with areas of active research on the ecology of mammals and practical experience with the excitement and headaches of formulating hypotheses, carrying out field work, and analyzing data. Some familiarity with elementary statistics is helpful but not necessary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 457. Algae in Freshwater Ecosystems.

Biological Evolution and Diversity

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Rex Lowe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in botany. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A survey of the algae of northern Michigan with emphasis on taxonomy and ecology. Students become familiar with the algae of streams, bogs, fens, swamps, beach pools, and the Great Lakes. Special attention is given to field investigations of periphyton and phytoplankton community ecology and their application to water quality assessment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 474. Wetlands Ecology.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Madsen

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two college-level courses in Biology, preferably one in Ecology. (5). (Excl). (BS).

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The course will familiarize students with the basic types of wetlands in northern Michigan (marshes, swamps, fens, and bogs) in terms of the essential factors of vegetation, hydrology, and soils. The ecological processes that form relationships among plant communities, wetland types, soil development, hydrology, topography/geomorphology, biogeochemistry, and paleoecology will be investigated primarily through extensive field work. Other topics that will be covered include adaptations or organisms to wetland conditions; special wetland types; wetland complexes; impacts of human management and utilization of wetlands; and wetland legislation, protection, and delineation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 486. Biology and Ecology of Fish.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Webb

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two laboratory courses in biology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Field and laboratory studies of fish communities. Field trips will sample a variety of aquatic habitats in the area, with analysis of habitat characteristics and fish community composition. Laboratories and lectures will examine physiological, behavioral, and functional morphological factors that determine possible ("fundamental") habitat range, and modifying organismic interactions such as predation and competition leading to actual ("realized") distributions. Strengths and weaknesses of various research approaches to analysis of communities will be evaluated.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Biol. 585. Ecology of Streams and Rivers.

Ecology and Population Biology

Section 711.

Instructor(s): Joseph Holomuzki

Prerequisites & Distribution: A previous or concurrent course in limnology, aquatic ecology, phycology, or aquatic invertebrates is recommended. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course takes an integrated approach to the study of population, community, and ecosystem structure and function in flowing water. Both observation and experimentation are used to explore interactions among algae, aquatic plants, invertebrates, and fish and their physical and chemical environments in streams and rivers. Study topics will include the natural history of benthic organisms, hydrodynamics, competition, predation, and ecosystem theories. Field trips are taken to streams for observation and comparison. Research experiences are emphasized.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

This page was created at 2:43 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


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