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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in English (Division 361)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for English.

To see what has been added or changed in English this week go to What's New This Week.

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A complete up to date listing of English Department course descriptions can be found on the World Wide Web at http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/.

For all English classes, registered students must be present at each of the first two meetings to claim their places. Any student who does not meet this requirement may be dropped from the course. NOTE: If you must miss a class due to religious observances, contact the instructor or leave a message for the instructor with the department (764-6330).

WRITING COURSES:

After taking or placing out of Introductory Composition, students may elect either English 224 or 225 for further practice in the fundamentals of expository and argumentative prose. English 325 offers the opportunity for work in argumentative and expository prose at a more advanced level.
Several sections of English 223, the beginning course in creative writing, are available each term. The work is multi-generic, and two of the following will be covered in each section: fiction, poetry, and drama, or you may take English 227 (Introductory Playwriting). A more advanced course for creative writers is English 323 (Fiction or Poetry), which is available after completion of the prerequisite, English 223. More experienced writers may apply for admission to specialized sections of English 327 (Playwriting), English 423 (Fiction), English 427 (Advanced Playwriting), and English 429 (Poetry). Admission to these advanced courses is by permission of the instructor, who may require writing samples.

INDEPENDENT STUDY:

Independent study in English must be elected under one of the following numbers: 226 (Directed Writing, 1-3 hours), 299 (Directed Reading, 1-3 hours), 426 (Directed Writing, 1-4 hours), 499 (Directed Reading, 1-4 hours). There is a limit to the total hours that may be taken under any one number. Students interested in independent study should obtain an application from the English Department office on the third floor of Angell Hall. Independent study proposals must be approved by a supervising professor and by the Undergraduate Chair of the department. The deadline for Independent Study in the Spring Term 1998 is May 15, 1998. The deadline for Independent Study in the Summer Term 1998 is July 10, 1998.


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 223. Creative Writing.

001

Instructor(s): Paul Barron (pdbarron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 225. Argumentative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 230. Introduction to Short Story and Novel.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We'll spend the first four weeks discussing short stories from the anthology along with the authors' commentaries. During the final three weeks, we'll concentrate on the two novels. Students will write two essays and a final exam. Texts will include: The Story and Its Writer (Fifth Edition), Ann Charters; A Portrait of the Artist, James Joyce; Song of Solomon, Toni Morrison.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will examine the ways in which different genres and periods have employed literature to understand and reflect upon historical catastrophes and crises. The genres considered will include drama, narrative poetry, novels, short stories, and the non-fictional memoir, and will range from the 17th century to recent fiction; each work will be paired with another from a different genre or period that shares with it certain themes, which will allow us to determine how our critical questions change when we move from one genre or historical period to another. Shakespeare's King Lear, for example, will be read alongside Jane Smiley's A Thousand Acres; Milton's Paradise Lost will be contrasted with James Galvin's account of a harsher Eden lost in this century in the American West. Grades will be based on short weekly writing assignments and two longer essays.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Lem Johnson (eljay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English is spoken and written in India and Ireland, in the Caribbean and in the USA; so too in Africa, New Zealand and Australia. The same is true of England, of course. In addition, certain "master texts" of the language have traveled and continue to travel world-wide. They exert influence on and are in turn influenced by Africans and Australians; by Indians and Caribbeans no less than by New Zealanders and North Americans. Such "master texts" include the plays of Shakespeare and the tales of Chaucer, the fiction in Daniel Defoe and the poetry of William Wordsworth. This is all in addition to the language of commerce in Coca Cola, Big Macs and Kentucky Fried Chicken. The Bible in English (King James version), the journalese of CNN World News, and the rhythms of North American mass culture (radio and rock-n-roll; Hollywood movies; television talk show; MTV's hip-hop, etc.) have all been of some consequence.

We'll look into a variety of "English" contexts to see what such contacts and transformations have produced. Our interest will thus lead us into, say, Mulk Raj Anand (Caliban and Gandhi), Dorothy Allison (Bastard Out of Carolina), and Austin Clarke (Growing Up Stupid Under the Union Jack). Other contexts will take us into the worlds of E. M. Forster (A Passage to India) and Raja Rao (Kanthapura); into Ama Ata Aidoo (Our Sister Killjoy) and Earl Lovelace ("Joebell and America"). We will add other "push-pull" instances of language-in-action by way of Shakespeare (Merchant of Venice) and Walt Whitman (excerpts from Leaves of Grass), Mark Twain (A Connecticut Yankee in King Arthur's Court) and Aldous Huxley (Brave New World). Note: Preceded by small reports (1-2 pages) on each reading, the major assignment for this course will be a Final Project (10 pages) which compares/contrasts any two texts from any two of our English-speaking regions, e.g., West Africa & North America; Caribbean and Australia, etc.

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Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Our world seems less and less literate every day, as advertising images, video, and music become our principal means of expression, but we continue to speak to one another in words, and literature is made up of words. In what ways are words relevant to your daily life and to your attempts to understand and to be understood? This is another way of asking the question "What is literature?," and it will guide our thinking about how language is central to everyday existence. Our accent will be on storytelling and its basic components (ideas about narrative, character, and plot). Our goal will be to understand why it is important for everyone to know what a story is. Our readings will be chosen from among the writings of Isak Dinesen, Adrienne Kennedy, Gabriel García Márquez, and Jean-Paul Sartre. Requirements include short weekly writing assignments, two 5-7 page papers, and exams.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 102.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 102 The Beat Generation. Meets the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Richard Tillinghast (rwtill@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/spring/lsa/enll/317/102.nsf

I saw the best minds of my generation destroyed by madness, starving hysterical naked, dragging themselves through the negro streets at dawn looking for an angry fix.

That's how Allen Ginsberg described his Beat Generation. The innovations of the 1950s Beat writers were paralleled by the work being done by Action Painters and jazz musicians from the Bebop school. We will explore these three outsider art worlds, listen to recorded jazz, read poetry and fiction, and look at documentary photographs of the major players while reading On the Road, Howl, Naked Lunch, etc., and viewing slides of Abstract Expressionist paintings. The course incorporates multimedia video and audio presentations. Expect brief weekly quizzes, a midterm and a final, plus a three-page and a five-page paper. Designed to appeal both to non-concentrators and to English concentrators.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 323. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (2). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will compose thirty pages of polished fiction, complete various exercises, and provide oral and written critiques of one another's stories. We'll also discuss a number of short stories and their authors' commentaries from the anthology. Text: The Story and Its Writer (Fifth Edition), Ann Charters.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 324. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and written permission of instructor. (3 in spring; 2 in summer). (Excl). May be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the summer half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Sections 102, 103, 104, 105, and 106 may be elected to satisfy the Upper-Level Writing Requirement.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 101 Rhetoric and Reasoning in Verbal and Visual Communication

Instructor(s): Barbra Morris (barbra@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Social critic Raymond Williams reminds us that communication is not a static concept; in cultures, discourses of various kinds and functions fluidly evolve and intersect, constantly transforming languages, signs, codes, conventions, images and symbols. Media dynamically influence each other. In a complex, ever-changing information environment, upon what factors do we, as participants and spectators, form judgments about diverse received ideas? How can we usefully investigate and reconsider texts that challenge and test our own points-of-view? Ultimately, upon what mixtures of evidence and analysis do we base our opinions? In this class, we apply various strategies of inquiry and interpretation to reconsideration of how individuals and issues are represented in three differing media: print, television, photography. In four writing assignments required for the class, we look toward ways in which our writing can extend, enhance, and reveal thoughtful reasoning: Logical inquiry, television content research, analytic criticism, and self-reflection. Class presentations and responses to papers are an integral part of classwork.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 101 This course satisfies the Pre-1830 Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course that will concentrate on the Shakespearean tragedy by focusing on "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so, we will study the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and its later manifestations in Antony and Cleopatra, and Coriolanus. There will be a midterm and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 368. Shakespeare and his Contemporaries.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Steven Mullaney (mullaney@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of major dramatic works by contemporaries of Shakespeare, along with a few Shakespearean plays selected to highlight the energetic dialogue between very different playwrights. Designed along the lines of English 367, this course can be taken either as a sequel or as an alternative to 367. Although we will be reading the plays intensively as literary works, we will also be considering social and political issues in Elizabethan and Jacobean England in order to clarify the complex engagement of the stage with cultural controversies of the period. The plays likely to be studied: The Spanish Tragedy, The Jew of Malta, Hamlet, The Revenger's Tragedy, The Changeling, The Duchess of Malfi (available at Shaman Drum Bookshop). There will be a midterm and a final exam, as well as two relatively short essays.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 101, 102.

Instructor(s): John Kucich (jkucich@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We will focus on three distinct historical/cultural periods Victorian, modern, and postmodern. Comprehending these three periods, and the reasons why they have succeeded each other in time, will clarify a wide range of literary developments over the past two hundred years. To help characterize the three periods, we will explore each period's dominant ideas about individualism, gender difference, and aesthetic form. Course materials will include both novels and films. Probable texts include novels by Donald Barthelme, Charlotte Brontë, James Joyce, Toni Morrison, Jean Rhys, and Charles Dickens, as well as 2-3 films. Midterm, final paper.

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Engl. 372. Studies in Literature, 1830-Present.

Section 103 This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Tobin Siebers (tobin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Romanticism was a movement of poetic lyricism, artistic rebellion, and personal idiosyncrasy. Fantastic literature enshrines differences and peculiarities of all kinds, highlighting those aspects of experience that venture beyond the strictly human toward a supernatural realm. In fantastic literature, then, the visionary poetics of the Romantic generation and the superstitious nightmares of common people converge, affirming idiosyncrasy, originality, and irrationality on all fronts. This course will descend into the maelstrom of fantastic violence, irrationality, and rebellion to ask how such apparently marginal phenomena prove to be not only central to the nature of literature itself but remarkably stimulating to the modern mind. Works include the short fiction of Hawthorne, Henry James, Poe, Washington Irving, and the European writers Nikolai Gogol, E.T.A. Hoffmann, and Guy de Maupassant. Requirements include a few short papers, some exams, and class participation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 101 This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Theatre and Drama 423.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 101 Topic? (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Jackie Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for English.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in English this week go to What's New This Week.


Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for English.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in English this week go to What's New This Week.


Engl. 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No one ever finishes learning to write, so this course focuses on helping students further develop their unique potentials as writers, readers, and thinkers. By analyzing texts from a variety of academic disciplines, students will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. What rhetorical strategies are common in different disciplines and why? How and when might we use those strategies in our own writing? For instance, what writing strategies would we call upon for a lab report, and would we use any of those strategies for a philosophical speculation, a history exam, a love letter? Throughout the term, students will work to identify the writing skills they most need to develop, and they'll invent and refine a personal style of expression that can be adapted to different audiences and purposes. Course requirements include at least 40 pages of writing, including at least 20 pages of revised, polished prose. For specific course descriptions for this course please visit the English Department Web site.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 239. What is Literature?

Section 201, 202.

Instructor(s): Egger Rebecca (egger@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section of "What is Literature?" focuses on the ways in which literary texts can be seen to rewrite, reinterpret, and respond to one another. Beginning with the assumption that it is very difficult if not impossible to pinpoint the original creator of any narrative, trope, or theme, we will instead consider authors as figures who borrow from, transform, and play off each other's efforts. Focusing on pairs of related texts, we will read William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom! alongside Toni Morrison's Beloved, both of which examine race, history, and the power of the dead; Charlotte Brontë's Jane Eyre and Jean Rhys' Wide Sargasso Sea, which address women's place in society; George Bernard Shaw's Pygmalion and David Mamet's Oleanna, which explore the power relations between teacher and student; and Joseph Conrad's Heart of Darkness and Francis Ford Coppola's film Apocalypse Now, which problematize the concepts of civilization and barbarism.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams and short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so). The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 202.

Instructor(s): Tom Lenaghan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Work in class will be devoted to discussion of particular poems selected The Norton Anthology of Poetry. The aim of the discussion will be to increase your understanding and appreciation of poetry. The first course objective will be to develop some common questions or assumptions about poetry. The second objective will be to find ways of answering such questions or testing such assumptions, and we will spend the greater part of the course reading poems in an effort to accomplish this. In the final weeks of the course we will read a number of poems by one poet.

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Engl. 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 203.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of a selection of authors from the Renaissance to the present. For the former, we will use Western Wind by John Frederick Nims. For the latter, we will use a course pack of selected poems. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Tom Lenaghan

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a writing course and its goal, as you might expect, is to help you write better. To that end you will write a paper every week and the writing cycle preparation, writing, peer editing, revision, submission, and return will determine how class time is spent. To provide some common focus we will read Shakespeare's Richard III and see McKellen and Pacino films.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 202.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 406/Ling. 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Richard Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be daily practice in grammatical parsing, weekly quizzes, and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language. Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Engl. 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 201 Class and Money in American Fiction. (2 credits). This course satisfies the American Literature requirement for English concentrators.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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Engl. 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

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