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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in History of Art (Division 392)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

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Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for History of Art.

To see what has been added or changed in History of Art this week go to What's New This Week.

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History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 101 Survey of the Arts of the Subcontinent. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Roslyn Hammers (rhammers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/SP00/HA364/

This survey course is designed to provide a basic understanding of the painting, sculpture, and architecture of the Indian subcontinent. By taking a straight-forward chronological approach, the lectures will take in a broad overview of the early art of the Indus Valley civilization, the arrival of the Aryans in India, and the development of basic Hindu and Buddhist themes that underlie the Indian artistic discourse. The arrival of Islam, the Sultanate period, and the transforming role of the Mughal court in the history of Indian art and architecture will also be discussed. We will conclude by considering the collapse of the Mughal atelier, and the subcontinent's uneasy transition to modernism. Students will be required to write from texts such as A.L Basham, The Wonder that was India and Ananda Coomaraswamy's, The Dance of Shiva. For the second paper, students may choose to discuss a painting from the Cleveland Museum or the University Museum. There will be three examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 102 Bodies in Science Fiction and Popular Culture 1950-2050: The Future of the Human. (3 credits). Meets with American Culture 301.101.

Instructor(s): Sandra Seekins (sseekins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

In this course we will examine bodies and embodiment in twentieth-century science fiction. Visual imagery and novels will be discussed in tandem with popular science writings and academic theories about technology. Attention will be paid to the cyberpunk movement of the 1980s and its followers (including the fiction of William Gibson, Neal Stephenson, Bruce Sterling, and films such as Lawnmower Man and The Matrix). In contrast to these representations of the future, feminist science fiction will be discussed (women authors such as Octavia Butler, Donna Haraway, Nancy Kress, Marge Piercy, and Connie Willis), along with predictions about genetic therapies, reproductive technologies, and cloning.

We will raise a number of questions about the constructed status of various kinds of bodies. What does it mean to be human in a technological society? Are some of us already "post-human" cyborgs? How are cutting edge technologies represented in film, literature, and art, and how do these representations in turn create and affect visions of technology? How will social relations, parenting, childbirth, economics, spirituality, and the environment be altered as computer and bio-technologies are ever more integrated into North American daily life and physical bodies? What roles do ethics, social values, speculation, and desire play imagined futures? Course requirements: class participation (25%), take-home midterm (25%), and archive project and presentation (50%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for History of Art.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in History of Art this week go to What's New This Week.


Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for History of Art.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in History of Art this week go to What's New This Week.


Hist. Art 394. Special Topics.

Section 201 Art and Money: Exploring the Relationship between Painting and Economics in the Dutch Golden Age. (3 Credits).

Instructor(s): Laura Bassett-Ho (labaho@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

Today the worlds of art and economics are closely linked in a variety of ways: works of art are commanding higher prices than ever before, and the value of a personal collection is considered a prominent marker of one's socioeconomic status. On the other hand, many art institutions struggle to keep afloat, and debates concerning public versus private support of the arts has grown tremendously. While particular issues did not arise until well into the twentieth century, artistic production and circulation has been intimately connected to economic practices and the accumulation of wealth for a much longer time. In this course, we will focus on the Netherlands of the seventeenth century, a culture in the early stages of modern capitalism, and one experiencing great economic prosperity as well as artistic achievements. We will look primarily at paintings but will consider other forms of pictorial representation, including prints and maps. Important issues include the rise of the merchant class, the growth of the art market, practices of collecting, and the expansion of overseas travel and trade. Our main objective is to situate the images within historical and socioeconomic frameworks, and more specifically to consider them in terms of contemporary commercial developments.

This class is organized into weekly themes, and readings are meant to reflect these themes by providing historical background as well as recent interpretations of topics about Dutch art. These readings will form the basis of small group presentations to take part at the beginning of each week. The remainder of class time will consist of lectures and discussions which will also be largely devoted to the examination of pictorial material. There will be a midterm and final exam, and a short paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

Hist. Art 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Hist. Art 458. Florentine Sculpture of the Renaissance.

Section 001.

Instructor(s): R. Ward Bissell (bissellw@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. of Art 102 or 250. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: www.umich.edu/~hartspc/histart

Following a brief unit on innovative achievements in Italian Medieval sculpture, the course will trace in detail the history of Florentine sculpture from the sumptuous International Style through the genesis and evolution of Early Renaissance realism to the heroic vision of the High Renaissance. Lectures on a select number of masters (above all Ghiberti, Donatello, Luca della Robbia, Verrocchio, and Michelangelo) will consider the works as at once products of specific sociocultural contexts, as testimony to special creative genius, and as esthetic objects which by instructing and moving us can change us forever. The lectures, keyed to a syllabus, will be supplemented by required and optional reading (for which a bibliography and reserve books will be provided) and continual study of the visual material, all leading to evaluation by way of a midterm and a final examination, both of essay format.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

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