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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in Philosophy (Division 442)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


This page was created at 2:53 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Philosophy.

To see what has been added or changed in Philosophy this week go to What's New This Week.

Search the LS&A Spring Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

Philosophy is about as broad a subject as one can find in a university curriculum. It addresses a wide array of questions, some quite familiar (Does God exist? Why be moral? What is art?), others less so (What is a thing? Is space a substance?). It also falls within philosophy to examine the methods and practices of virtually all academic disciplines. Because of this breadth, a person can study philosophy in ways involving the styles and techniques of thought of most other fields of inquiry. For example, the work of a philosopher concentrating in logic is much like that of the student of mathematics. A philosopher primarily interested in the philosophy of religion will often be doing much the same things as a theologian or a student of the history of religion. Political philosophy is regarded by some as including political activity itself. Many other such examples exist. In addition, philosophy examines the practices of other activities, such as the fine arts, that are sometimes thought of as different from typical academic disciplines. However, for the most part the activities characteristic of philosophy are peculiar to the discipline. The only way to know what it's really like is to give it a try.

In the Spring Term, the Department offers a number of courses that do not carry prerequisites Philosophy 181, 303, 340, 365, and 371. Philosophy 181 is a general introduction designed to acquaint students with a representative sample of philosophical problems concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, the self, morality, religion, and society. Philosophy 303 is an introduction to symbolic logic, and meets a requirement for the concentration. Philosophy 340 addresses the relationship between mind, consciousness, and intelligence to matter and the brain. Philosophy 365 considers philosophical issues connected with religion and religious belief. Philosophy 371 is a consideration of existentialism and related strands of continental philosophical thought. Spring offerings are limited to 50 students, and sometimes enroll as few as 20.


Philo. 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): James Bell (jmab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Steve Petersen (spetey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 203, 296 or 414. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~spetey/teaching/303.html

An introduction to formal logic with emphasis on truth-functional languages and monadic predicate logic with identity. The course covers the metatheory of truth-functional logic in detail, and also basic concepts of the proof theory and model theory for first-order languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Philo. 340. Mind, Matter, and Machines.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Karen Bennett (elizab@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~elizab/340.html

This course will be a study of the mind/body problem and related questions. What are minds, and how do we manage to have them? How can there be room for conscious beings in a world apparently composed of physical stuff and governed by physical laws? Are minds supernatural entities souls which lie beyond the reach of science? Or are minds just very complicated physical structures? What is the relationship between psychology and physics, or psychology and computer science? Could a properly designed computer think? Could it experience emotion? How can our beliefs, feelings, and desires ever cause us to act? etc. Class will involve both lecture and discussion. Written work will likely consist of two short papers and a final. A previous philosophy course is recommended, but not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 365/Rel. 365. Problems of Religion.

Section 101 Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: Common Doctrines.

Instructor(s): Samuel Ruhmkorff (sgrumh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on doctrines common to Judaism, Christianity, and Islam: that there is one God, a personal being who created the universe, who has revealed himself to his creatures, and who requires certain conduct of them. We will explore various questions raised by these doctrines, including:

  • Can God's existence be reconciled with the existence of evil?
  • Is there compelling evidence for God's existence?
  • Should we have evidence of God's existence in order to believe in God?
  • What is faith, and does being religious require it?
  • Do we have any evidence for miracles?
  • Is there an afterlife?

Though previous background in philosophy is helpful, it is not required.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 371. Existentialism.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Gregory Walski (gwalski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we will explore both non-religious (or atheistic) and religious (or theistic) existentialism. The readings will center primarily around Camus, Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche; but readings will also include pieces from Kafka, Ortega y Gasset, and lesser-known figures such as Thomas Merton. The two themes which will dominate the course are the notion of the "absurd", as found prominently in Camus and Kierkegaard, and the notion of a "leap" as a response to recognition of the absurd.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 397. Topics in Philosophy.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and instructor. (2). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course number is designed to permit philosophy concentrators, upon recommendation of a concentration advisor, to elect a course a second time for credit when it has a different instructor and covers substantially different material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for a total of eight credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 498. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for Philosophy.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Philosophy this week go to What's New This Week.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Philosophy.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Philosophy this week go to What's New This Week.


Philosophy is about as broad a subject as one can find in a university curriculum. It addresses a wide array of questions, some quite familiar (Does God exist? Why be moral? What is art?), others less so (What is a thing? Is space a substance?). It also falls within philosophy to examine the methods and practices of virtually all academic disciplines. Because of this breadth, a person can study philosophy in ways involving the styles and techniques of thought of most other fields of inquiry. For example, the work of a philosopher concentrating in logic is much like that of the student of mathematics. A philosopher primarily interested in the philosophy of religion will often be doing much the same things as a theologian or a student of the history of religion. Political philosophy is regarded by some as including political activity itself. Many other such examples exist. In addition, philosophy examines the practices of other activities, such as the fine arts, that are sometimes thought of as different from typical academic disciplines. However, for the most part the activities characteristic of philosophy are peculiar to the discipline. The only way to know what it's really like is to give it a try.

In the Summer Term, the Department offers a number of courses that do not carry prerequisites Philosophy 180, 181, 356, and 359. Philosophy 180 is an introduction to critical thinking and logic. Philosophy 181 is a general introduction designed to acquaint students with a representative sample of philosophical problems concerning the nature of reality, knowledge, the self, morality, religion, and society. Philosophy 356 addresses ethical issues that arise in connection with the practice of modern medicine. Philosophy 359 addresses philosophical and ethical issues concerning the law. Summer offerings are limited to 50 students, and sometimes enroll as few as 15.


Philo. 180. Introductory Logic.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Charles Goodman (cgoodman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (2). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An elementary introduction to logic. Topics include the concepts of validity and invalidity of arguments, fallacies in reasoning, the nature and use of definitions. The basic principles of modern deductive logic are covered; elements of inductive logic may also be discussed.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Nishiten Shah (nishah@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is an introductory class in which we will examine some of the central roles that reason plays in our lives. Issues covered will include evidential vs. pragmatic reasons for belief, scepticism about the external world, the nature of moral reasons (what reasons do we have to be moral), and freedom of the will. We will be concerned with trying to understand how one might be free in belief and action and yet be under the control of reason. This will help us to further understand how freedom of the will is possible in a deterministic universe.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 356. Issues in Bioethics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Sax

Prerequisites & Distribution: No prerequisites; one philosophy introduction is recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An examination of various ethical issues having to do with biology, medicine, and human and animal life in general, such as abortion, euthanasia, the idea of the rights of animals, medical care and the rights and obligations involved in it.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 359. Law and Philosophy.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Kevin Toh (ktoh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course consists of philosophical investigations into the nature of law and its various relations to morality. In the first half of the course, we will ask: Is the fact that certain conduct is by common standards immoral sufficient to justify making that conduct punishable by law? Is it morally permissible to legally enforce morality? We may seek to answer these questions by concentrating on particular social issues, such as: pornography, euthanasia, drug use, and/or homosexuality. Readings that may be used for this half of the course include works by: J.S. Mill, J.F. Stephen, O.W. Holmes, H.L.A. Hart, P. Devlin, and B. Williams. Whereas the first half of the course deals with what law should be, the second half deals with what law is. We will look at several philosophical proposals regarding the nature of law and of legal judgments. We will ask: Is an immoral law a law? Is there a necessary or conceptual connection between law and morality? Is it possible to describe the workings of a legal system without morally evaluating that system? Readings that may be used for this half of the course include works by: J. Austin, H.L.A. Hart, R. Dworkin, and J. Raz.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 397. Topics in Philosophy.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and instructor. (2). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course number is designed to permit philosophy concentrators, upon recommendation of a concentration advisor, to elect a course a second time for credit when it has a different instructor and covers substantially different material.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for a total of eight credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

Philo. 428/Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 201 China's Evolution under Communism

Instructor(s): Andrew Mertha (amertha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~amertha/

See Political Science 428.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Philo. 499. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

This page was created at 2:54 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


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