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Spring/Summer '00 Course Guide

Courses in Political Science (Division 450)


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2000 (May 2 June 23, 2000)
Spring/Summer Term, 2000 (May 2 August 18, 2000)
Summer Half-Term, 2000 (June 28 August 18, 2000)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

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This page was created at 2:54 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


Spring Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Spring Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Political Science.

To see what has been added or changed in Political Science this week go to What's New This Week.

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Poli. Sci. 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Marek Steedman (mdsteed@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Man is born free, and everywhere he is in chains," says Rousseau. In this course we will explore what this might mean, whether Rousseau is right, and how anyone could know, through an examination of some of the key texts in Western political thought. Other authors include Plato, Machiavelli, Locke, Marx and Mill. Class sessions will be a mix of lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 140. Introduction to Comparative Politics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Irfan Nooruddin (irfann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lib.umich.edu/libhome/Reserves/SP00/PS140/

This course is designed to provide the participants with an overview of important topics in comparative politics. Each class, we will discuss some area of the scholarly literature, usually focusing on a major theoretical controversy. Topics we will cover include, but are not limited to, social movements, political participation, revolutions and revolts, electoral and party politics, democratization, political culture, political and economic development, and the various linkages there in.

We will study these topics using the powerful tool of the comparative method, whereby we will utilize the variation across states to formulate and evaluate generalizable explanations for various political phenomena. The course will combine lecture and discussion with some combination of participation, papers and "blue book" exams forming the basis for the grade. No knowledge of history, economics, or political science is required for this course. Rather the only prerequisite is a desire to learn about how politics happens around the world and to seek the "truth" about the unknowable.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 411. American Political Processes.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Harvey Schuckman (harveyps@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a survey course in political opinion and political participation. Central topics include the formation of public opinion, the reasons people participate or abstain from politics, the role of political parties and interest groups, and the relationship between political participants and government.

This course will pay particular attention to questions of democracy and representation, including: Are the American people capable of being effective citizens in a democracy? What biases exist in American political participation? What are the barriers to political participation? How does the government respond to public opinion and political participation?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): John Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Legal Process will examine a host of different issues pertaining to legal theory and legal organizations. Among them, we'll ask:

  1. What is the difference between law and politics and why is that distinction worth investigating? Is politics simply an arena where the most powerful person wins where as law exists to uncover truth?
  2. How can one justify the law, in all its myriad manifestations, as autonomous and "logical"? What are the implicit assumptions in these theories that allow them to justify the authority and autonomy of law? By exposing these latent assumptions, can we still view law, in principle, as impartial and infallible?
  3. Is law really neutral with regard to the identities of members in society, or does it reflect the individual interests of certain groups? Do the theoretical underpinnings of law affect the marginal members of society the same way as the powerful?
  4. Does law differ from morality? If so, what's at stake in such a distinction? That is, what do we gain and lose as a matter of theory by thinking of the two as different? Can judges ever refrain from introducing their own personal morality into their decision-making process?

We'll read court cases, articles and a few books as we embark on our journey to answer these questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 421. American State Government.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Scott Allard (sallard@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/spring/lsa/polsci/421/101.nsf

State governments occupy an increasingly more important and vital space in the American federal system today than even ten years ago. As the federal government continues to devolve policy responsibilities to subnational government, governors and state legislatures have become more active in a range of new policy-making activities.

This course will examine the basic institutional features of state government, the changes that state government has undergone in an era of devolution, and the policy-making challenges that will confront state leaders in the coming decade. The course also will focus upon how the relationships between state and local government will affect how our leaders address issues of poverty, economic development, transportation, and social service provision.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 448. Governments and Politics of Latin America.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Jose Perales (jrph@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140 or 440; or a course on Latin America elected through another department. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an extensive survey of topics in Latin American politics. We will be discussing some of the most salient issues affecting contemporary politics in Latin America, including political institutions, the consolidation of democracy, development and economic growth, and the challenge of social policy. Although political scientists and other analysts mostly treat Latin America as a single entity, topic discussions will incorporate differences among selected Latin American countries to provide a better understanding of how some of the issues covered in the course become manifested in the region. The course does not assume students have any prior knowledge of Latin America.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 460. Problems in World Politics.

Section 101 The Politics of the Global Environment

Instructor(s): Denise DeGarmo (pscden@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit twice with permission of the instructor.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The impact of human activity on the global environment is becoming one of the central focal points of debate in world politics. This seminar class is designed around several broad themes, including:

  • How are environmental issues challenging accepted notions of how the international political system works?
  • What are the main "fault lines", or points of conflict in international environmental negotiations?
  • How has the international community responded to the environmental crisis?
  • How have environmental politics re- shaped debates at the national political level, both in the world's richer and poorer countries?

The course is divided into three main parts. The first part will be mainly theoretical. It examines some of the major debates surrounding global environmental change, examining the sorts of issues involved, and how world politics theory are confronting these problems. It also addresses how conflicting values and interests on the part of countries and individuals affect how environmental issues are perceived and addressed.

The second part of the course examines policy responses to environmental degradation. Not only will we examine nation-state behavior in the environmental realm, we will also examine the role of non-state actors in the formulation and implementation of international environmental policy. We will also discuss the problems and prospects for successful international environmental cooperation. Finally, we look at how policies are changing at the national level in response to international environmental activity, examining how rich and poor countries alike are confronting environmental degradation at the local and global levels.

In Part Three of the course, we switch to examining individual topics in the international environmental realm including global climate change and biodiversity.

Requirements and Grades:
I expect you to come to class with the assigned reading(s) for that class read. It is imperative that you engage the material since class time will be divided between lecture and discussion. Class attendance is required. Exams comprise readings and class discussion.

The requirements for the course are as follows (the percentages of the overall grade are in parentheses).

  1. One research paper reflecting the student's interest in a specific global environmental issue (25%). An outline for this project will be distributed the first week of class.
  2. A take-home mid-term examination (25%).
  3. A take- home final examination (30%).
  4. Regular attendance and class participation (20%). This includes giving one (1) issue presentation to the class. A sign-up sheet for topics will be distributed in class.
Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Take me to the Spring/Summer Term '00 Time Schedule for Political Science.
Search the LS&A Spring/Summer Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Political Science this week go to What's New This Week.


Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 491. Directed Studies.

Section 001 Russia's Changing Political Elite.

Instructor(s): Judith Kullberg

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2000/spsu/lsa/polsci/491/001.nsf

Many political scientists believe that the survival and performance of democracy in any nation depends to a considerable degree on the nation's political elite. If democracy is to survive, the political elite must accept the democratic rules of the game and actively support the development of democratic institutions. If democracy is to survive in Russia, the political elite must not only embrace democratic ideals and behaviors, but also cast off Marxist-Leninist understandings of politics and the behavioral norms of communism. The goal of this research project is to assess the extent to which the Russian political elite accepts and supports democracy. We will do this by examining and analyzing the behavior of the top 100 influential political figures in present-day Russia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Summer Half-Term Courses

Take me to the Summer Half-Term '00 Time Schedule for Political Science.

Search the LS&A Summer Half-Term Course Guide (Advanced Search Page)

To see what has been added or changed in Political Science this week go to What's New This Week.


Poli. Sci. 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Kris Miler (kcmiler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a broad survey of government and politics in the United States which explores a wide range of topics including elections, interest groups, the presidency, Congress, and the courts. This course examines a wide range of topics related to politics and government in the United States, beginning with an examination of the theoretical frameworks of American government, with an emphasis on the Constitution.

The course will then examine how various actors, institutions, and groups play a role in the system, and how they affect outcomes and policy formation. The kinds of questions considered might include the following: What impact do interest groups have on governmental policy? Are there real differences between the two major political parties? What accounts for swings in voting behavior and election outcome from one time to another? How do members of Congress decide how to vote? In what ways do presidents and bureaucrats affect public policies? We will pay particular attention to how the rules of the system and the ability to change (or not change) these rules shapes outcomes.

In particular, the course will examine how the relatively unique structure of the American system from its method of choosing leaders to its justice system has influenced the country's development. This is not a comprehensive list but suggests the kinds of issues that are discussed in this course. There are two lectures and two discussion section meetings each week. There is generally a midterm, a final examination, and some other written work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Todd Allee (tallee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of the contemporary global political system. The focus is on theories and perspectives that help us understand international political, economic, and military/security behavior. This is not a current events course. Historical and current events are discussed primarily to shed light on theoretical ideas and illustrate general patterns of behavior.

We will begin by reviewing the historical development of the international system and examining the dominant theories put forward to explain world politics broadly. Next we look at recent trends in world politics and think about the growing role of nationalism, as well as the influence of non-state actors such as international organizations and multinational corporations. We then attempt to explain when and why states engage in cooperative (as opposed to conflictual) behavior and look at the various constraints and influences that affect foreign policy behavior. Ultimately we'll devote two large sections to: (1) studying military/security behavior and the causes of violent conflict, and (2) investigating international economic relations, including trade policy and North-South relations.

We'll conclude with a brief examination of other global issues such as human rights, environmental degradation, and humanitarian intervention. There will be two exams, one 8 to 10 page writing assignment, and several shorter writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 413. American Constitutional Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Luis Fuentes-Rohwer (lfr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 111, 410, or 411. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will take you on an introductory journey through the field of American Constitutional law. In so doing, we will spend our time paying close attention to the Constitution and the system of government it sought to establish. Keep in mind that while this is neither a history course nor a class on current affairs, these two perspectives will often enhance our discussions, as they will present interesting angles and links to the weekly materials.

Three overarching questions will drive the first part of the course: (1) What is the (and in some important respects, a) Constitution; (2) How do conscientious political actors go about interpreting its mandates, some of which are hopelessly indeterminate; and (3) Who is entrusted with ultimate interpretive authority? In the second part of the course, we will reflect on these larger constitutional themes as we examine specific textual examples of our fundamental law.

Some of the topics we will cover include: separation of powers; federalism; congressional and executive powers and their implied limits; judicial review; fundamental rights; and the substantive components of both the Due Process and Equal Protection Clause.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 428/Asian Studies 428/Phil. 428/Soc. 426. China's Evolution Under Communism.

Section 201 China's Evolution under Communism

Instructor(s): Andrew Mertha (amertha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl).

Foriegn Lit

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~amertha/

This course examines the broad scope of political, economic, and historical forces that have shaped the fascinating and enigmatic contemporary Chinese state.

The course is divided into three sections. The first outlines the political history of the Chinese Communist Party (CCP) from its inception in 1921 through the revolution in 1949 and up to the present era of economic reform.

The second part looks at the functioning of the post-1949 Chinese state, and will provide a conceptual analysis on China's governing structure. Special attention will be paid to elite decision-making processes, the structure of China's bureaucratic apparatus, the relationships between the CCP and the government, tensions between the national government and local governments, and the role of the military.

The final section builds upon the first two to illustrate the challenges faced by China's leaders in several issue-areas, which include (but are not necessarily limited to) the ongoing reform of the economy, China's foreign relations, the relationship between China's legal and administrative enforcement mechanisms, China's environmental policy, and state-society relations. There will be a midterm, final exam, and one research paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Poli. Sci. 492. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

Poli. Sci. 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 201 Class to Take Place in Washington. D.C. Dates to be Announced. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Kimala Price (kimala@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will focus on the process by which public policy is created and how various actors participate in and influence that process at the national level.

We will also explore how political science and "real life" experience can inform one another. This will be a very "hands-on" course, as students will use their internship offices as research sites for their class projects. Guest speakers from the Washington political community will be scheduled to share their insights with the class. Requirement: Basic knowledge of American government.

The class will be limited to 15 students on a first come/first served basis and will meet in Washington, DC once a week. Location, day and time TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

This page was created at 2:54 PM on Mon, Aug 14, 2000.


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