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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology

This page was created at 6:48 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology


ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture and ethnicity; human genetics, evolution, and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex and gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and the emergence of a world system. Required readings may include an introductory text and various paperbacks. Lectures and discussion. Two objectives exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 Archaeology of Modern American Life.

Instructor(s): Shannon Lee Dawdy (sdawdy@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In the year 1700, most Americans made their own clothes and ate what they could grow, catch or barter. In the year 2000, Americans wear the national colors of Tommy Hilfiger and eat lunch at McDonald's. These radical changes in material culture are often characterized as the process of "modernization." Technology and modern consumption have created new classes of artifacts, from Barbie to Captain Crunch. What can artifacts teach us about the American way of life and the changes it has undergone in the last 500 years? When did Americans begin to think of themselves as "modern" and what does this mean? How have everyday objects contributed to American identity? We will consider both how material culture reflects major socioeconomic changes and how objects themselves help bring change about. Discussions will progress weekly with example studies of American material life in the 17th, 18th, 19th, and 20th centuries. This course will introduce students to the fields of historical archaeology and American material culture studies. Through class readings, discussions and assignments, students will investigate different methods for studying everyday objects, the history of consumption, and the material dimensions of ideology and power.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 Food, Society and Culture.

Instructor(s): Christopher Michael O'leary (cmoleary@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces a main theme of anthropology food. The study of food occupies a central place in the works of some of the most well-known anthropologists, many of whom have become famous exactly for their works on food. Unlike many other things, the study of food incorporates information from most areas of anthropology. In this course, we will explore the various ways people have studied food. I begin with a brief introduction to the basics of nutrition since many other works use this as a base for their analysis. From there, we move to the varied ways in which anthropologists have studied the material, and ideological aspects of food consumption and its social, and cultural consequences. Course grades will be based on one midterm exam, one final exam, and participation. Both the midterm and the cumulative final will consist of 20 multiple choice questions and one essay on the topics covered in class. The midterm will be held during normal class session.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 102 Bambi, Birkenstocks and Buckshot: An Anthropology of Hunting in the Modern United States.

Instructor(s): John Francis Collins (collinsj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In "Bambi, Birkenstocks and Buckshot" we will examine hunting in the modern world, with an emphasis on class, race, gender, and community relations in Michigan and North America. The seminar, designed for hunters and non-hunters as well as their opponents and supporters, will approach hunting as a form of practical knowledge that both divides and draws people and groups closer together. How does Bambi as a symbol of human relationships to the natural world refer to a storybook character, a future meal, or both? Are Birkenstocks simply sandals or might they refer to a political stance relative to Bambi as meat, sport or cartoon character? What is the future of buckshot in a nation increasingly characterized by suburban subdivisions and wary of guns and the people who use them?

Anthropologists have long studied hunters in so-called "simple" societies but this seminar turns anthropological analysis towards the United States and a practice that involves millions of people, is fiercely defended and attacked by different citizens' groups, attracts substantial government regulation, and moves millions of dollars. We will discuss texts including the film Predator, starring Arnold Schwarzenegger, the diaries of Lewis and Clarke, Native American accounts of local knowledge and related debates over hunting rights, the paintings of John Audobon, the song "Who Killed Bambi?" by the Sex Pistols, President Theodore Roosevelt's stories of Grizzly Bear hunting, Buffalo Bill's European wild west show, and the rituals and tall tales of automobile line workers at Reo motors in Lansing, Michigan. Course requirements are one short reaction paper and one longer paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology


ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ANTHRCUL

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Cultural Anthropology


ANTHRCUL 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 Two Worlds Collide: Culture Contact in the New World.

Instructor(s): Patrick C Livingood (patrickl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~patrickl/anth296/

The most important event in world history in the last 500 years is the contact that occurred between the people of the Americas and the people of Europe, Asia, and Africa. For 12,000 years, each hemisphere developed its own history, traditions, and cultural practices, largely independent of each other. Since 1492, the combination of epidemic diseases, exploration, trade, colonization, resettlement, and warfare has resulted in dramatic cultural changes, the fallout of which still challenges us today. This course will examine this dramatic point in history by looking at information gathered from archaeological sites and from historical documents. Special attention will be paid to "first contact" situations and with trying to understand the motivations and viewpoints that each culture had of each other and of themselves. This course will use case studies from all over the New World including Michigan, New England, the southeastern U.S., the Caribbean, Central America, and Peru, as well as others. Readings will come from a course pack, and grades will depend on class participation, exams, and a final paper in which students will examine one case study of culture contact in more detail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 The Evolution of Culture

Instructor(s): Brian Edward Malley (bmalley@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How did the rich cultural lifestyle of our species arise? When? Why? In the last twenty years, anthropologists, psychologists, and biologists have proposed a variety of new theories of the development of cultural living. In this course we will review some recent proposals for the evolution of culture, including those of evolutionary psychology and Richard Dawkins' memetics. We will critically examine these theories in the light of what is known both about human evolutionary history and about modern culture. We will emphasize the core logical structure of these evolutionary arguments, their empirical adequacy, and the relation between what they predict and what anthropological studies have discovered about culture today. Core topics will include: the emergence of culture in the archaeological record, the evolution of language, human cognition as an adaptation, the nature and structure of cultural systems, and the complexity of human communication.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 202 Danger and Disorder: An Anthropology of Crime.

Instructor(s): Ellen E Moodie (emoodie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~emoodie/DANGER.html

Who are the "bad guys"? We all have ideas about who to avoid and where to be scared. Just about everyone could say something about why thieves and gangsters and killers do what they do. In this seminar we will take an anthropological perspective to challenge " common-sense" notions of criminality, comparing ideas about lawbreaking and violence through history and in different societies.

Through the term we'll move around the globe among our stops communities in the Philippines, England, Brazil, the United States, South Africa, Mexico and the Trobriand Islands as we explore how crime is conceptualized in various cultures. We will watch films, read newspapers, listen to popular music, study ethnographies, and analyze some criminological theory in order to grasp different cultural ways of seeing and knowing disorder and subversion.

Class meetings will entail short lectures, discussions, films, guest speakers and presentations. Course requirements will include a take-home essay exam, brief writing assignments and a short research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s): John D Speth (jdspeth@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (6). (Excl).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Provides undergraduate and graduate students with training in excavation, survey, and artifact analysis, while participating in ongoing research. The sites excavated are all Native American in origin. All lectures and mush of the training related to artifact and site interpretation stress Native American lifeways, symbolic and religious values, etc.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 202.

Instructor(s): John O'Shea (joshea@umich.edu), Robert Whallon (whallon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (6). (Excl).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The UM Training Program in Archaeology is designed to instruct students in field and related laboratory methods of anthropological archaeology. Students will receive training in basic methods of archaeological survey, excavation, artifact recording and analysis while participating in an active research project. The specific research problems to be addressed and field location may vary from year to year, depending upon the research interest of the director of the program. Field training will be integrated with lectures and seminar-like sessions on archaeological method and theory. Laboratory sessions will introduce students to the recording and analysis of artifacts, including stone tools, ceramics, animal bones, and plant remains. In addition to learning the basic technical skills of field archaeology, each student will work together with the director and staff to develop a small but original research project, based on the data recovered and analyzed during the excavations. The results of this research will be submitted as a written paper at the end of the field season. For the highly motivated Michigan student, the Department of Anthropology offers laboratory courses each fall following the field season (Anthro. 496 and 499), which allow the students to continue and extend the research he or she began in the field. Researc by the more professionally motivated students may be developed into an undergraduate Honors thesis (Anthro. 398).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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