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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies

This page was created at 6:49 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ASIAN

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for Asian Studies


ASIAN 252/Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 101 The Righteous and the Renegades: Representations of Samurai in Japanese Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Michelle Plauche (mplauche@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

As a powerful and enduring cultural icon, the figure of the samurai has occupied a significant place in Japanese literature and culture. In this course we will examine how the warriors were represented in literary and cultural practices both during the time of warrior rule and in the modern period when the samurai class had become obsolete.

Sword fights to the death, revenge, sacrificial suicide these are the images evoked by the figure of the samurai. In Japan and the United States, the samurai has been understood both as a figure of adventure and stoicism and as a static symbol of a nation and its shared past. His code of honor, bushidô, has been taken as the source of national values and identity. However, when literary and cultural representations of the icon are examined, it is clear that image and meaning of the warrior and his code signify diverse social and cultural values as well as political and ideological agendas.

In this course we will examine how the cultural significance of the samurai has changed through time and also how the iconic figure has been deployed to represent differing and sometime conflicting values. Using Eiko Ikegami's The Taming of the Samurai, an investigation into the development and eventual decline of the ruling warrior class in Japanese history, as a background text, we will look at representations of samurai in various literary genres and visual media such as woodblock prints, film, and manga across time into the modern era.

We will begin by reading setsuwa warrior tales and oral war tales from the period when the warrior class rose to power. We will continue by examining the warriors' representations of themselves and their code of honor in bushidô manuals after which we will read Edo period representations of the ruling class including and kabuki dramas. We will pay close attention to the ways in which the code of the samurai, as outlined in the manuals, is depicted in literary representations.

In the last half of the course, we will examine representations of the samurai in fiction and film of the modern period after the abolition of the warrior class. We will consider how the figure is understood as an anachronism as well as a significant key to Japan's culture and historical past. Furthermore, we will explore how the popularized icon is appropriated for the promotion of a national consciousness as well as for the resistance to that dominant national ideology. Finally, we will look at the significance of the samurai in post-war and contemporary Japan.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252/Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 102 The Tale of Genji in Japanese Literature.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Robinson (jrobins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Tale of Genji has been called the world's first novel, written by a court woman in tenth century Japan, long before any comparable work had been produced in the west. It has been hailed both for its literary value, as a sophisticated psychological drama, and for its historical importance, as a detailed portrait of Heian era Japan. In any case, it is definitely the most influential work of Japanese literature, help up as an ideal of courtly aesthetics and inspiring later works in genres as disparate as the vulgar gesaku fiction and the refined drama.

Unfortunately, although the importance of the work is widely recognized, the work is quite long and is thus difficult to read in its entirety in Japanese literature courses. This class will focus entirely on the Tale of Genji and its place in the Japanese literary tradition. We will begin by exploring the tale's precursors, the early forms of Japanese prose fiction, and the role they filled in the Heian court. We will then read the Tale of Genji itself, along with secondary courses which explore various approaches to understanding the novel, as well as those which describe the cultural climate of the Heian period. Finally, we will examine later works influenced by the tale, from early response to the work in diary literature, to adaptations of certain episodes from the tale in drama, to modern works inspired by the tale. Through this, students will gain both a familiarity with the Tale of Genji itself and an understanding of its place in Japanese literature.

This class is intended for undergraduates in their second or third year of study. It does not require a background in Japanese or Japanese literature. In examining the Genji in its historical context, it will provide a basic background in the Japanese literary tradition, and is thus appropriate both for non-majors who wish to be exposed to a non-Western literary tradition and for majors who wish to deepen their understanding of the field. Classes will be divided between lectures for introducing important concepts and discussion of class readings centering on students' interaction with the texts. All reading will be in English and will include both translations of primary sources and general guides to Japanese literature. Requirement for the course include regular class participation, a short-answer identification midterm exam, a short-answer plus essay final exam, and a 7-10 page paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 490. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 101 Contemporary Japanese Society.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ASIAN

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Asian Studies


ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ASIAN

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Asian Studies


ASIAN 251/Chinese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Section 201 East Asian Thought: Sung Confucianism and Zen Buddhism. Meets with Asian Studies 252.201.

Instructor(s): Robert Rama (rrama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Although the Tang dynasty (618-907) is often cited as the pre-eminent golden age of high Chinese culture, the Sung (960-1278) was similarly a period of significant intellectual and cultural growth. The influence of these cultural developments expended beyond the borders of China to Korea and Japan, and to the countries of South and Southeast Asia as well. During the Sung period, new ways of understanding the Confucian tradition were informed and enriched by the tenets of Buddhist philosophy. One of the primary purposes of this class will be to explore Buddhist and Confucian ideas of ethics and self-cultivation, with an eye towards seeing examples of the impact of Zen Buddhism on the development of Sung and Ming Confucian ideas.

First, this course will provide a general introduction to the intellectual context of early Chinese Confucianism. Discussion of Confucianism will be grounded in excerpts from The Analects and the Mencius, and supported by secondary materials on Confucius and Confucianism. The next stage in the course will introduce the fundamentals of Buddhist philosophy, with particular attention toward Zen Buddhism and Lin-chi. After this, we will turn to the history of Sung Confucianism and the interaction between Buddhist and Confucian thinking. We will discuss this in the light of ideas found in the writings of important Neo-Confucians, including the Chen brothers, Zhu Xi, and the later thinker, Wang Yangming. To end the course, we will pull back to get a wider picture of Confucianism, and consider how aspects of this social philosophy were transformed over time in the cultures of East Asia.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252/Japanese 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 201 East Asian Thought: Sung Confucianism and Zen Buddhism. Meets with Asian Studies 251.201.

Instructor(s): Robert Rama (rrama@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Asian Studies 251.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 490. Topics in Japanese Studies.

Section 201 Contemporary Japanese Society,

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 511. Colloquium on Southern Asia: The Interface of the Humanities and the Social Sciences.

Section 511.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Graduate Course Listings for ASIAN.


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This page was created at 6:49 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


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