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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

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Courses in English

This page was created at 3:17 PM on Fri, Jun 8, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


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Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for English


ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Writing and Literature

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

By connecting the two terms of its title, Writing and Literature aims to help prepare the student to produce the range and quality of expository prose expected in college courses. Works of literature will be considered for their effective use of language and argument. They will serve as reference points for thinking and writing strategies. Characteristically, sections of English 125 will involve the writing of a minimum of five essays, with considerate attention given to the preparation of drafts and to revision. The literary works which will serve as points of reference will vary from section to section and from term to term.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Jason Kirk (jckirk@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Many courses ask you to slave over a hot argument for two weeks or ten pages, again and again, only for your work to reach an astonishing audience of one, who then gives it a grade and hands it back to fade into lonely obscurity. Not here! We will write, edit, publish, and distribute our own magazine of argument. What's argument? Argument is NOT apologetic. Argument is NOT dispassionate. Argument is NOT boring. We'll go from there, reading and discussing spicy work from a spread of different writers and forums who demonstrate that, with a point and a passion, writing actually can emerge from the blurry and uninspired drivel you find in almost any major newspaper or magazine, into smashing, punchy, interesting prose that matters. Come ready to make noise and waves.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 106.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 107.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 108.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 109.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

All sections of 223 teach the writing of two of the following three genres: fiction (including personal narrative), drama, and poetry. Different sections will emphasize the individual genres to varying degrees. Class work involves the discussion of the process of writing and the work of a few published authors. Students will do exercises meant to develop a sensitivity to language and a facility with evocative detail, voice, form, and so forth. Most classroom time, however, is devoted to reading and discussion of student writing. A final portfolio of revised finished work of 35-50 manuscript pages may be required.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Manu Samriti Chander (mchander@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In his preface to The Picture of Dorian Gray, Oscar Wilde wrote: "All art is quite useless." In this class, we will aim to disprove Wilde's statement by writing poetry and fiction that reflect outward upon the world. Class time will be divided between discussing the strategies of successful, socially-conscious writers (Fulton, Brodsky, Clifton, Baldwin, Joyce, and Kincaid, to name a few) and critiquing one another's work. By the end of the semester students will have compiled a portfolio comprised of roughly 25 pages; attended at least one reading outside of class; and learned a great deal about the pragmatic power of language, i.e. the way it can be quite useful in defining and understanding the contexts which we inhabit.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Nick Harp

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Our brains are dulled by the incurable mania of wanting to make the unknown known." Andre Breton

This introductory creative writing course will encourage students to explore their ideas and experience using the navigational tools of language. Halving our time between poetry and fiction, we will use our writing to investigate what is interesting and infuriating and funny and moving and transforming and, best of all, mysterious about what we know (or think we know) of living in the world. To provide inspiration and lend guidance, we will read a broad selection of writers from varied ages, backgrounds and perspectives, and discuss how they bend and exercise their craft. We will incorporate, whenever appropriate, other media (music, film, painting, photography, television, and more) to further enrich our discussions and inspire our own efforts. Most crucial to our class, however, will be the daily time we spend "workshopping"; each other's work providing sensitive constructive criticism toward thoughtful revision and improvements. A serious desire to write well, and to explore what's stirring about life are the course's only prerequisites. Students may expect to complete 3-5 revised poems and 10-15 pages of revised fiction for their final portfolio.

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ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Fritz Swanson (fgs@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

At the end of this course each student, provided they apply themselves, will come away with a final portfolio of revised writing: 20+ pages of fiction and 10+ pages of poetry (actual numbers may vary). How will we do this? First we'll read some published fiction and poetry so that we can get a handle on what people have done in the past. We'll talk about those pieces. What we like about them. What we don't. We'll also talk about work that we are reading as individuals.

Second, we will all write some poetry, some prose, and then talk about it. The goal of this class is to get you to read, write and think creatively. If everyone comes to this course with an open mind and a willingness to do some work, the course will be a success.

Authors on the syllabus: J.D. Salinger, William Gibson, Stephen Millhauser, Richard Brautigan, Philip Levine, e e cummings, John Ashberry, and many more.

Class is graded on attendance, participation and a willingness to revise your writing for an audience.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 012.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 101 Seeing is Believing: Argument and Visual Culture.

Instructor(s): Colleen O'Brien (mmajomo@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~mmajomo/225syll.htm

This class focuses on the skills necessary for effective argumentative writing. Critical reading is indispensable to writing an argument. By concentrating on model essays in the reader as well as various samples of "visual culture" ranging from television and magazines to sports and "art," we will build on critical reading and writing skills. The focus of many of our class discussions will be to analyze representations of women and men from various United States ethnic groups. By assessing the meaning of various markers of difference such as gender, race, class, and sexuality in popular culture, we will formulate weekly essays that interpret and evaluate how visual images mean something to us. A sample syllabus for this course is online: www-personal.umich.edu/~mmajomo/225syll.htm

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Eileen K Pollack (epollacl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This section will focus on the nineteenth- and twentieth-century short story, in traditional and experimental forms, by mainstream and minority writers. Through close readings of the texts and hands-on experience with the form, we will explore the elements of the story (i.e., character, conflict, setting, dialogue), narrative structures and points of views, uses of language, and ways in which these elements combine to create or convey meaning(s) for the reader. Texts will include The Story and Its Writer, edited by Ann Charters, as well as a course pack, and a collection of two or stories by specific authors. Students will be expected to turn in weekly response papers (2 pages each), one longer essay (4-6 pages) and a short story.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Sarah Frantz (frantzsj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

When we participate in literature, through reading, viewing, and performance, how is our access to a character's mind manipulated by the author? How can we know that we know what the hero is feeling? Was Hamlet really mad? Did Heathcliff really love Cathy? Every creator of literature, whether novelist, poet, dramatist, or essayist, uses particular narrative and stylistic strategies to convey character, story, tone, theme, to a particular audience. Using our own theme of masculine emotion, we will examine the nuts and bolts of these literary strategies, as well as analyzing how Literature-with-a-capital-L is defined by these strategies and by society. What and who defines a text Great Literature or Trash? Be prepared for heavy reading (possible texts: Wuthering Heights, Hamlet, some Byron, a modern romance) and intense writing (probable requirements: one 5-7 page close reading, one 6-8 page analysis, many smaller response papers, and most excitingly, some literature or even Literature of your own!), but also be prepared to have fun while beginning your college exploration of literature.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Sondra Gates (sonsmith@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In a chapter called "What is Literature and Does it Matter?" Jonathan Culler proposes that the term "literature" might be something like the term "weed." A plant is determined to be a weed not according to any intrinsic biological properties but according to how people treat it: "weeds are simply plants that gardeners don't want to have growing in their gardens," Culler explains. In the same way, a piece of writing might become a piece of literature simply because people treat it as such. But how *do* readers treat literature? How do they respond to literature, what do they expect of it, and what do they bring to their readings? Moreover, is "literature" indeed really like "weed," or are there certain criteria a piece of writing must meet in order to qualify as literature? These are the questions we'll be investigating together as we read a variety of poems, stories, books, and other textual artifacts ranging from the verses of Emily Dickinson unquestionably considered literature today to the unpublished diaries of unknown writers. Assignments include regular postings to the course web site, a class presentation, and a take-home final.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson (gregerso@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

We live in a period of immensely rich poetic production in the United States: men and women of widely divergent cultural backgrounds, aesthetic persuasions, and registers of "voice" are producing lyric poetry of unprecedented variety and abundance. But how is a reader to find foothold among the hundreds of literary magazines and book publications that clamor for attention? How to negotiate between private pleasure (and solace and reflection) on the one hand and this jubilant (and contentious and contradictory) marketplace of verse on the other? How to find a listening post midst all this noise? This course is not conceived as an historical survey, but we will spend approximately half the term examining poems from another period of intense lyric production the 16th and 17th centuries in England because these poems provide a particularly vivid introduction to the resources, and resourceful violations, of traditional poetic form. In the second half of the term, we will read and discuss and listen to a group of recent American poems, ones I think are particularly good at suggesting the variety of contemporary pleasures, good too at constructing the margin of silence that poetry, like other forms of music, requires in order to be heard. From this modest, two-pronged historical perspective, we will explore some highly immodest questions about poetic form: How does it make meaning? How does it sound? What is its relationship to human imagination?

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The aim of this course is to introduce you to the art of poetry so that you can read and discuss any poem with understanding and delight. During the term, we will move from a general survey of poetic techniques and forms to a more detailed study of the work of selected authors from the Renaissance to the present. Formal writing will include three (ungraded) exercises in poetic analysis and four (graded) papers (3-5 pages) on individual authors and poems.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): William Hogan

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This discussion-based class will aim to increase both your appreciation of poetry and your ability to understand and explain how poems work, both orally and in writing. We will study a variety of poems written in English from about 1600 to the present, paying close attention to the language, forms, figures, and themes of verse, and to literary-historical conditions that influence poetic craft. You will write frequently in a number of genres: brief essays explicating individual short poems, at least one longer analytical/argumentative essay, and an informal web-based discussion group. As a likely final project, you will construct your own anthology with introduction, annotations, and footnotes.

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ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

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ENGLISH 320/AAS 338. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

Section 101 African American Literature and Racial Passing.

Instructor(s): Nicole Stanton (stantonn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See CAAS 338.101.

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 101, 102.

Instructor(s): Patricia T O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: English 223 and junior standing. (2). (CE). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students will compose thirty pages of polished fiction, complete various exercises, and provide oral and written critiques of one another's stories. We'll also discuss a number of short stories and their authors' commentaries from the anthology. Text: Best American Short Stories, 2000 ed. E.L Doctorow

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 102 The Art of Biography

Instructor(s): Troy Gordon

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course allows students to think about and practice the art of representing other people's lives in written form. Building on the critical, argumentative writing skills developed in lower-division writing courses, we will study biography in relation to other genres of representation such as historical annals, literary novels, psychoanalytical case studies, visual portraiture, and autobiography. Questions to be addressed include: How can stories be told from fragmentary evidence? When should the line between truth and fiction be blurred? To what extent is it possible to render a past life by describing places and objects rather than people? In what ways do the interests and desires of the biographer alter the shape of the written life-story? Four substantial, creative essays and a few shorter pieces constitute the main written requirements. Readings include material by Virginia Woolf, Sigmund Freud, Maxine Hong Kingston, Oscar Wilde, Gertrude Stein, Jamaica Kincaid, Langston Hughes and others.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 103 The Criminal Element.

Instructor(s): Maureen Aitken (aitkenm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Criminal Element This course will focus on the subject of crime. Americans are in news, television, movies, and literature obsessed with the idea of crime and criminals. We will consider possible sources for this obsession. We will look at people who are publicly viewed as criminals and read experiences of those who have suffered because of crime. Books for the course include In Cold Blood, Giovanni's Room and Brother and Keepers. This course will also help students broaden their essay skills by exploring new approaches to writing. Students will write 30 pages of polished nonfiction for this course: either narrative work (not to exceed 12 pages) or formal academic writing (analysis, review, research, interpretation). Expect to write a great deal in the course, and to regularly share that work with other students and myself.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 104.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 105 Exploring the Possibilities of a Pedagogy of Possibility.

Instructor(s): Tim Murnen (tmurnen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The question Why are you here in this composition class? will have different answers depending on who is asking, who is answering, and what perspective you take toward the question. What is it that we expect to get out of a composition course? What does the university expect such a course to accomplish? Are our expectations realistic? What shapes those expectations? There are a great many assumptions about what students are supposed to be doing and learning in a college composition course. In this course we will write so as to explore the ramifications of these assumptions. We will be reading the work of compositionists who have done some thinking on this and who have played a role in shaping the field of composition in which we are operating, including Peter Elbow, Linda Flower, James Berlin, David Bartholomae, Bruce Horner, Min-Zhan Lu, and Kay Halasek. In particular our approach will be grounded in the concept of Dialogism as explored by Mikhail Bakhtin. We also will be reading other types of writing which often serve as writing prompts in college composition-essays, short stories, poetry-and exploring what it means to respond to these genres in our writing. Finally, I will be looking for students to shape much of the course along with me, as we choose readings to share with our colleagues, and explore what it means to write in response to the concepts and issues that arise in our classroom community. If you intend to take this course, begin by asking yourself a few questions. Why must we take an advanced composition course? What role do I think such a course will serve for me? What ought we to be reading in such a course? What should we be writing about? And what counts as writing in a college composition course? What is the essay supposed to look like? Says who? What might an essay look like given the possibilities?

We won't write 4-5 distinct essays. We'll be drafting and revising anywhere from 60-90 pages of work which we will assess at three different points during the term, ending with a final grade. Lots of reading and writing, but what else would you expect from an advance composition course?

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ENGLISH 367. Shakespeare's Principal Plays.

Section 101 Satisfies the Pre-1830 Literature requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a course that will concentrate on Shakespearean tragedy by focusing on "the grand style" of Hamlet, Macbeth, Othello, and King Lear. But in doing so, we will study the origins of this tragic mode in the earlier tragedies and how this relates to the structure of Shakespeare's comedies and history plays. There will be a midterm and a final exam.

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ENGLISH 370. Studies in Medieval and Renaissance Literature.

Section 101 The Social World of English Renaissance Poetry

Instructor(s): Amanda Watson (alwatson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of eight credits with department permission.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How many times have you heard poetry described as "timeless" and "universal"? In this course, which focuses on the poetry of the English Renaissance, we'll take a different approach and explore the many ways in which a poem arises from and intervenes in its own time. Using the political, social, and religious history of the sixteenth and seventeenth centuries as a background, we'll read a wide range of poems (some short, some long) by a variety of authors (some familiar, some less familiar), together with a selection of related prose texts from the period. We'll consider how the often turbulent history of the period affected both what poets wrote about and how they wrote how, for instance, the politics of the English court took a cue from love poetry (and vice versa), or how the devotional lyric participated in impassioned debates over the Protestant Reformation. You can also expect to hone your poetry-reading skills through a lot of close analysis, both in written work and in our class discussions. Poets studied may include Anne Askew, Richard Crashaw, John Donne, Queen Elizabeth I, George Herbert, Aemilia Lanyer, Andrew Marvell, John Milton, William Shakespeare, Sir Philip Sidney, Rachel Speght, Edmund Spenser, Lady Mary Wroth, and Sir Thomas Wyatt. Course requirements will include weekly response papers (2 pages each), one longer paper (7-10 pages), a final exam, regular attendance, and enthusiastic participation.

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ENGLISH 406/Ling. 406. Modern English Grammar.

Section 101 Satisfies the Language requirement for the English/Education Certification Program.

Instructor(s): Richard D Cureton (rcureton@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course fulfills the Language requirement for the English/Education Certification Program.

This is an advanced survey of descriptive English grammar. We will look closely at the formal and semantic motivations for basic grammatical categories and processes in English (words, phrases, clauses, and sentences) and we will discuss how these structures contribute to the expressive potential of the system. There will be weekly practice in grammatical parsing and a final exam. The course should be attractive to those professionally interested in English education, practical criticism, or further work in linguistic theory as well as those generally interested in becoming more articulate about the structure of our language.

Texts: Randolph Quirk and Sidney Greenbaum, A Student's Grammar of the English Language and John Algeo, Exercises in Contemporary English.

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ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 101 Renaissance Drama

Instructor(s): Linda K Gregerson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The burgeoning success of the popular stage in late sixteenth-century England produced a series of virulent attacks on plays and play-going. Anti-theatrical polemicists like Stephen Gosson and Phillip Stubbes argued that the popular stage was an incitement to public disorder, a profound destabilizer of governance, moral restraint, class and gender coherence. I propose to examine in this course some of the ways in which the Renaissance theatre deliberately raised questions about the nature of order and disruption in human affairs, using violence as a key exhibit in the contemplation of national, psychological, and domestic disorder. I have not yet finalized our selection of plays, but likely candidates are Titus Andronicus (Shakespeare), Arden of Feversham (anonymous), The Spanish Tragedy (Kyd), Edward II (Marlowe), Hamlet (Shakespeare), The Revenger's Tragedy (Tourneur), and Shoemaker's Holiday (Dekker). This course fulfills the Pre-1600 distribution requirement for English concentrators.

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ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

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ENGLISH 449/Theatre 423. American Theatre and Drama.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Enoch Brater (enochb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This survey course will examine the origin and development of U.S. drama in the twentieth century. Beginning with playwrights like O'Neill, Glaspell, Rice, Odets, and Treadwell, the class will focus on the interrelationship of U.S. culture in American drama and American drama in U.S. culture, especially as it manifests itself in the mid-century plays of Miller, Williams, and Hellman. Topics of class discussion will include: the emergence of a nativist theater tradition, the role of ethnicity, the situation of the female playwright, the conflict between commercial and artistic values, and the move to a more pluralistic and inclusive theater, one in which previously marginalized voices move to center stage. Additional playwrights on the reading list include Hansberry, Albee, Mamet, Shepard, Fornes, Lanford Wilson, Kushner, Wang, and August Wilson.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for English


ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for ENGLISH

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for English


ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. The student should have taken a prior course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Theresa Braunschneider (tbraun@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will think about the ways that a literary text can direct, gratify, and/or thwart our expectations of the text itself or of literature more generally. Reading from a variety of genres and historical periods, we will ask how a given short story, novel, poem, or play both produces and restrains possibilities for understanding it. We will also discuss how our understandings of literary works change when our assumptions about how or why we read change. In particular, we will consider how our expectations about literary works are shaped by our assumptions about politicized cultural categories such as gender, sexuality, race, or class that the texts implicitly or explicitly address. As we engage works by authors including Laurence Sterne, Jeanette Winterson, Grace Paley, Toni Cade Bambara, Gabriel Garcia Marquez, and William Shakespeare, students will develop a vocabulary of literary terms and a range of reading techniques that will prepare them for further literary study. Our time is short, so the reading requirements of this course will be intense (but designed to encourage the venerable tradition of spending long summer days under a shady tree with a good book). Course requirements include careful reading of all assigned texts as well as engaged participation in class discussions. In addition to some informal and in-class writing, students will write two essays, revisions of those essays, and a take-home final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 202.

Instructor(s): Karin Spirn (kspirn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"What is Literature?" All of the texts for this course will ask this question in one form or another. We will focus on "self-conscious" forms of writing, those texts that draw attention to their own written form and style. We will also examine a number of critical and theoretical texts about the question of literature. These texts will lead us to a new set of questions, including: How can we tell what is literature? How is fictional writing related to "true" or "real" events? What is the difference between poetry and fiction, and why would we need both? When does non-fiction writing count as literature? In searching for the answers to these questions, students will be introduced to the function and purpose of literary criticism, and will have the chance to try on different critical personas in their own writing.

Requirements include regular readings, participation, short in-class and take-home assignments, and two 5-7 page papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 201 Satisfies the Pre-1830 requirement for the English concentration.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The first part of this course will concentrate on prosody the techniques of verse, how poems are put together, how they work. The second part will undertake a mini-history of English poetry, concentrating on some of the major poems from the Renaissance through the Modernists. There will be two exams, short daily writing assignments (a paragraph or so) and two five page analytical papers. The text will be the Norton Anthology of Poetry.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 202.

Instructor(s): Robert T Lenaghan (tlenegha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

English 240 is a prerequisite to the English concentration. Work in class will be devoted to discussion of particular poems selected The Norton Anthology of Poetry. The aim of the discussion will be to increase your understanding and appreciation of poetry. The first course objective will be to develop some common questions or assumptions about poetry. The second objective will be to find ways of answering such questions or testing such assumptions, and we will spend the greater part of the course reading poems in an effort to accomplish this. In the final weeks of the course we will read a number of poems by one poet. There will be a midterm, a short paper or two, in-class exercises, and a final.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 203.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Lutman (jlutman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

"Poetry? I just don't get it." The aim of this course is to move toward "getting poetry" and then to write about it with authority and feeling. We will look at a wide range of poems in a kind of hypertext approach, exploring relationships of contemporary poetry to poetry of the past through "links" of allusion, form, rhythm and meter, imagery, and other aspects of craft. In addition to exploring how poetry works and getting a sense of its history in English, we will consider its status and its contribution to today's society: what is it worth and what can it do? Requirements for the course include regular attendance, one informal class presentation, frequent exercises and short writing assignments, a midterm, two formal papers (3-5 pages), and a take-home final. Text TBA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of three credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, the student should have prior credit for a course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Robert T Lenaghan (tlenagha@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This is a writing course and its goal, as you might expect, is to help you write better. To that end you will write a paper every week and the writing cycle preparation, writing, peer editing, revision, submission, and return will determine how class time is spent. To provide some common focus we will read Shakespeare's Richard III and see the McKellen and Pacino films. The course grade will be calculated as the average of the individual paper grades.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 202.

Instructor(s): Robert Cosgrove (rcosgrov@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

What makes an essay an essay, and what makes good writing good? These are obvious questions to start with in a course on Advanced Essay Writing, aren't they? But how much do we really think about those questions? Here in the English Department (and in other parts of the University), you're expected to write essays (and plenty of 'em), but what kind of expectations do you as writers have to face, and are they consistent with your own ideas of what makes writing "good" to you? Perhaps we can use this course for exploring ways to bridge the gap between what we "have" to do and what we "want" to do, as well as considering how various cultures and sub-cultures determine what "good" writing means. In addition to weekly informal writing assignments, you'll be expected to produce 24-30 pages of formally graded writing (we can determine how we want to break this down). You'll also be expected to come to the course with some idea of what you consider to be good writing, and you should think about what exemplary text(s) you'd like us to read that will help us understand what you think good writing is. In addition, you'll extend your thinking about good writing by reading a book (of your choosing) that proposes to teach the reader how to write well, and report on what it really taught you. Class time will be spent considering these texts and workshopping the texts students write so that, in addition to working out definitions of "good writing" individually, we will also negotiate what it means to define good writing as an intellectual community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 203.

Instructor(s): Shawn Christian ( shawnac@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

To enhance our experience as writers in this course, we hope to produce more complex forms of self-expression and consider the implications of style in our writing. "The essay" will serve as the focus of our textual study and production in three specific ways. First, through self-generated writing prompts, we will cultivate a context for writing the essay in our class. We will also attempt to answer three questions: what is an effective essay? How does a writer produce an effective essay? Why is the essay a useful form of written communication? We will construct answers to these questions as a class and gauge other university readers/writers' perspectives, from a range of disciplines, on the essay through local research. Lastly, to expand our discussion of the essay as a form, we will also read personal essays, literary criticism, memoirs, argumentative/persuasive essays, and various combinations or blurrings of these genres. Since the writing experience in this course would not be complete without revision and feedback, a major class activity will be the writing workshop, where we dialogue about our written insights.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will cover some of the major comic works in English literature from 1660 to 1830: several Restoration comedies, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Pope's The Rape of the Lock, Fielding's Joseph Andrews, Austen's Pride and Prejudice and, time allowing, Gay's The Beggar's Opera. There will be frequent short written responses to the readings, one longer formal paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit with department permission.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised writing agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Students should have prior credit for a course in writing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of nine credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A program of supervised study agreed upon by a student and a member of the faculty. Normally, students should have had a prior course in literature.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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