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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art

This page was created at 6:57 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 101 CONTEMPORARY ARTISTS/ART SINCE 1960.

Instructor(s): Alexandra Koser Schwartz (akschwar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will provide an overview of artistic production from 1960 to the present. The course will be structured around case studies of a variety of artists working in all media, primarily in the United States. Readings will include critical and theoretical texts as well as writings and interviews by the artists themselves. Class time will be divided between lectures, seminar-style discussions, group work, student presentations, and videos. Artists to be considered include: Claes Oldenburg, Ed Ruscha, Robert Morris, Robert Smithson, Mary Miss, Adrian Piper, Mary Kelly, Hans Haacke, Cindy Sherman, Andrea Fraser, Matthew Barney, Mike Kelley.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 102 PERSONAL ADORNMENT: TATTOOS, ORNAMENTS, AND TEXTILES OF SOUTHEAST ASIA.

Instructor(s): Mary-Louise Totton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Personal adornments may be viewed as identity markers and social transcripts in most regions of the world. Punk rockers and Wall Street bankers, Maori tribal dancers and Japanese mobsters, European royalty and Catholic bishops may all be easily distinguished from each other by their choice of ornaments, clothing, and/or tattoos. This class will consider the great variety of personal adornments used by the peoples of Southeast Asia and Oceania as art historical documents. Each week using "case studies" we will investigate the function and agency of personal adornments, and how these personal arts invoke topics of tradition, transformation, and transitions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art


HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for HISTART

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for History of Art


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 201 BODIES IN SCIENCE FICTION AND POPULAR CULTURE. Meets with American Culture 301.203

Instructor(s): Sandra Lynn Seekins (sseekins@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine bodies and embodiment in twentieth-century science fiction books, films and television programs, popular science writings, and academic theories about technology. In addition to films such as The Matrix, we will look at artists who use technologies in their work (Laurie Anderson's performances, the destructive machine performances put on by the Survival Research Laboratory, the cybernetic performances of Stelarc, and the recent biotech informed work of Eduardo Kac). We will investigate the category of the cyborg for its utopian (optimistic) and dystopian (pessimistic) aspects.

Feminist science fiction and feminist cyber-theory will be discussed along with the implications of genetic engineering, reproductive technologies, artificial intelligence, and cloning. How are these cutting edge technologies represented in film, literature, and art, and how do these representations in turn create or transform visions of technology? What roles do ethics, social values, speculation, and desire play in imagined futures? Which bodies profit from technological innovations and which ones suffer from their proliferation? As the course unfolds, it will become apparent that we construct the future out of our awareness of the past and the present. In addition to being imagined everyday, the future also has a visual history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 202 ART & CULTURE OF WEIMAR GERMANY.

Instructor(s): Anne Catherine Duroe (aduroe@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The Weimar Republic (1918-1933) was a period of drastic social and political change in Germany, but it is equally known for the daring artistic experimentation and innovation that occurred during its years. In this course, we will examine the art of this period, and some of its film and architecture, aiming to understand how these works responded to and in turn shaped their cultural context. We will study the multi-media work of the Berlin Dadaists, the collages of Kurt Schwitters, the photomontages of Hannah Höch and John Heartfield, the architecture and design of the Bauhaus, and films such as Fritz Lang's Metropolis and Josef von Sternberg's The Blue Angel. Our central question throughout the course will be: how did artists grapple with modernity, how did they define it? The course will proceed roughly chronologically, but along the way, we will find a number of recurrent themes: shifting notions of artistic identity; the autonomy of art and its relationship to mass culture; artist's ideas about technology; the "gendering" of modernity; the place of the city in artists' imaginations and their work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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This page was created at 6:58 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


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