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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Philosophy

This page was created at 7:01 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy


PHIL 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kevin G Toh (ktoh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to the basic issues and methods of philosophy. Topics and readings are from both traditional and contemporary philosophy, and include discussion of such issues as the nature and foundation of knowledge, the source and justification of moral values, the relation of mind and body, and determinism and free will.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 303. Introduction to Symbolic Logic.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Peter B M Vranas (vranas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 203, 296 or 414. (3). (MSA). (BS).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An introduction to formal logic with emphasis on truth-functional languages and predicate logic with identity. The course covers the metatheory of truth-functional logic and basic concepts of proof theory and model theory for first-order languages.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 340. Mind, Matter, and Machines.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Stephen David Petersen (spetey@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A study of some central questions about the human mind and its place in nature. Topics may include the materialist vs. the dualist conceptions of mind, behaviorism, minds as machines, the mentality of computing devices, and the concept of a person as an enduring entity and moral agent.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 356. Issues in Bioethics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Craig Malcolm Duncan (cdunc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No prerequisites; one philosophy introduction is recommended. (3). (HU).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

An examination of various ethical issues having to do with life, death, and human health. We will begin by examining some broad philosophical questions such as: How is death best defined? Is death always bad for a person? If not, when is it bad and when is it good? After that we will examine some more concrete issues that arise in the practice of medicine. Possible topics of study include abortion, physician assisted suicide, new genetic and reproductive technologies, and health care rationing.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 371. Existentialism.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Gregory M Walski (gwalski@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this class, we will explore both non-religious (or atheistic) and religious (or theistic) existentialism. The readings will center primarily around Camus, Kierkegaard, Dostoevsky, and Nietzsche; but readings will also include pieces from Kafka, Ortega y Gasset, and lesser-known figures such as Thomas Merton. The two themes which will dominate the course are the notion of the "absurd", as found prominently in Camus and Kierkegaard, and the notion of a "leap" as a response to recognition of the absurd.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: One philosophy introduction and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected twice for a total of eight credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Independent study of a topic not otherwise available through a regular departmental offering.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 498. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy



Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for PHIL

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Philosophy


PHIL 180. Introductory Logic.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Robert Alan Mabrito (rmabrito@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for only one of Phil. 180 or 201. (2). (HU). (BS).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to topics related to the evaluation of arguments. It is intended to perform two functions: to acquaint the students with logic as a topic of study, and to provide them with greater critical tools and improved reasoning abilities for use in any field. The course begins by discussing the difference between "good" and "bad" arguments and goes on to cover methods for telling whether a given argument is a "good" or a "bad" one. These methods include the use of symbolic logic. There will be lectures, discussions, and a variety of exercises. Texts and methods of evaluation to be determined.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 181. Philosophical Issues: An Introduction.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Kathleen Meghan Mc Shane (katemcsh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 182, 202, 231, 232, 234, or 297. (2). (HU).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce you to philosophy through the examination of issues in several major areas of philosophy. These may include ethics, epistemology, metaphysics, and philosophy of religion. Over the course of the term, we will consider the answers that philosophers have given to some of the following questions: How can we tell right from wrong and good from bad? Is there any such thing as "objective" morality? How can we distinguish appearance from reality? What kind of knowledge can we have about the world? Are there good reasons for thinking that God exists? Do we really have free will? Our readings will include mostly classical texts, among them works by Plato, Mill, Kant, Descartes, Locke, and Berkeley, although we will read the writings of a few contemporary philosophers as well. In this course you will learn some methods for thinking carefully about some of the most fundamental questions of human existence; in doing so you will learn how to reason critically, write articulately, and argue effectively.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 355. Contemporary Moral Problems.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Blain Everett Neufeld (blainen@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Phil. 455. (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

The purpose of this course is to explore some contemporary moral issues. Pursuant to this aim, we will begin by examining the three most important approaches to moral thinking in contemporary philosophy: namely, consequentialist, deontological, and virtue-based approaches. We will then consider how these theories might help us to think about a number of important issues. These issues might include: the permissibility or impermissibility of abortion; the moral acceptability or unacceptability of different kinds of sexual and marital relations; the permissibility or impermissibility of recreational drug use; whether we have any moral duties to animals; and whether we have any moral duties concerning the natural environment.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 365/Rel. 365. Problems of Religion.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Charles A Goodman (cgoodman@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU).

Credits: (4; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is a philosophical examination of some central truth-claims of the world's great religious traditions. Topics to be covered may include: the cosmological, ontological, and teleological arguments for the existence of God; the problem of evil; free will and Divine foreknowledge; miracles and religious experience; Islamic monotheism and critiques of the doctrine of the Trinity; Hindu monism and the doctrine of the unity of the soul with God; and Buddhist critiques of the concepts of God and the soul.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

PHIL 499. Senior Honors in Philosophy.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: By departmental permission only. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Students who wish to elect the Philosophy 498-499 sequence should consult with the departmental Honors advisor by the end of the preceding academic year.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for PHIL.


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This page was created at 7:02 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


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