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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Political Science

This page was created at 7:03 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


Skip to a Specific Term's Descriptions:

Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for Political Science


POLSCI 101. Introduction to Political Theory.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Eric Steven Kos

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Inquiry into assumptions about politics and the words used to express them. Persistent political questions, such as the nature of power, authority, freedom, and justice are discussed in classic and modern contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 411. American Political Processes.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Nicholas John Winter

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will examine public opinion and assess its place in the American political system. The course will emphasize both how citizens' thinking about politics is shaped, and the effects public opinion has on political campaigns, elections and government. The course will examine research on the current state of public opinion. Throughout the course we will also discuss historical developments in opinion and its place in politics, including changes that arose with the development of polling and with the advent of television and other electronic media. We will also consider normative questions, including the role opinion should play in American democracy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 412. Courts, Politics and Society.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): John Min Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course, we will examine a host of different issues pertaining to legal theory and legal organizations. Among them, we'll ask:

What is the difference between law and politics and why is that distinction worth investigating? Is politics simply an arena where the most powerful person wins where as law exists to uncover truth?

How can one justify the law, in all its myriad manifestations, as autonomous and "logical"? What are the implicit assumptions in these theories that allow them to justify the authority and autonomy of law? By exposing these latent assumptions, can we still view law, in principle, as impartial and infallible?

Is law really neutral with regard to the identities of members in society, or does it reflect the individual interests of certain groups? Do the theoretical underpinnings of law affect the marginal members of society the same way as the powerful?

Does law differ from morality? If so, what's at stake in such a distinction? That is, what do we gain and lose as a matter of theory by thinking of the two as different? Can judges ever refrain from introducing their own personal morality into their decision-making process?

We'll read court cases, articles and a few books as we embark on our journey to answer these questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 419/AAS 418. Black Americans and the Political System.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Brian De Mc Kenzie (mckenzie@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class is intended to provide students with an introduction to African-American political behavior. Throughout the course, an emphasis will be placed on students developing a systematic way of thinking about political institutions, behaviors, processes, and traditions in the United States. Theoretically, the course builds on the pioneering work of political scientists in the intellectual tradition of African-American politics. In addition, this course considers current debates in the study of African-American politics. Course material and discussions will focus on the important role of African-Americans in the political process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 448. Governments and Politics of Latin America.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Claudio Alberto Holzner

Prerequisites & Distribution: Pol. Sci. 140 or 440; or a course on Latin America elected through another department. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

How has political participation changed in Latin America? Which groups and individuals are most active? What are the most common ways in which citizens seek to change the political system and place issues on the national agenda? The course will explore changes in political action and political participation in Latin America during the past few decades. Before the 1980's, this topic did not receive much attention given the authoritarian character of many Latin American governments. But it is wrong to think that citizens during this period were passive or did not work to open up closed political systems, even at great risk to themselves. Of course, the return of democracy to many Latin American countries during the last two decades has created opportunities and incentives for ordinary citizens to become active in politics. Many new actors and groups have taken advantage of these political openings and are participating in politics in new and innovative ways. During the term, we will examine political action in a variety of institutional contexts, ranging from authoritarian systems, corporatist regimes, and relatively open and competitive democracies. We'll study social movements (urban and rural), electoral participation, the emergence of new actors such as women, religious organizations and indigenous groups, and the role of organizations and NGO's in promoting political activity.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 450. Political Modernization in the Developing World.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Irfan Nooruddin (irfann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Any 100-level course in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~irfann/teaching/450.htm

At the start of a new millennium, the world faces a profound moral dilemma. While citizens of the First World enjoy ever increasing incomes and comforts, the majority of the world's population suffer in abject poverty. Why are some nations rich while others remain mired in inescapable misery? In this course, we will examine theories of development with an eye to understanding the underlying causes of development and underdevelopment. The key thesis I will argue is that history and institutions matter, but we will examine alternative explanations too. Throughout, we will employ the theoretical lens of political economy to exploit the explanatory leverage generated at the intersections of politics and economics. (No background in economics is presumed). Finally, the purpose of the course is to engage in social science and not to serve as a forum for policy debate.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 591. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 101 credits?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400-level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Political Science


POLSCI 491. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits. No more than four credits of directed study credit may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. A directed study may focus on any subject agreed upon by a student and an advising instructor that does not duplicate a regular course offering. Students wishing to enroll for a directed study course are urged to work out the details of the course before the start of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for POLSCI

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Political Science


POLSCI 111. Introduction to American Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Kristina Cipera Miler

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


POLSCI 160. Introduction to World Politics.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Todd Layton Allee (tallee@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for First and Second Year Students. (4). (SS).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to the study of the contemporary global political system. The focus is on theories and perspectives that help us understand international political, economic, and military/security behavior. This is not a current events course. Historical and current events are discussed primarily to shed light on theoretical ideas and illustrate general patterns of behavior.

We will begin by reviewing the historical development of the international system and examining the dominant theories put forward to explain world politics broadly. Next we look at recent trends in world politics and think about the growing role of nationalism, as well as the influence of non-state actors such as international organizations and multinational corporations. We then attempt to explain when and why states engage in cooperative (as opposed to conflictual) behavior and look at the various constraints and influences that affect foreign policy behavior. Ultimately we'll devote two large sections to: (1) studying military/security behavior and the causes of violent conflict, and (2) investigating international economic relations, including trade policy and North-South relations.

We'll conclude with a brief examination of other global issues such as human rights, environmental degradation, and humanitarian intervention. There will be a final exam, one longer paper, and several quizzes and shorter writing assignments.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 414. The Politics of Civil Liberties and Civil Rights.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): John Min Kang (johnkang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl). May be repeated twice, for a total of six credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines civil rights and civil liberties from the perspective of Supreme Court opinions in various areas. We'll read cases involving First Amendment issues (like religious expression and anti-government speech); Substantive Due Process issues (like abortion and euthanasia); Equal Protection issues (like gender and racial discrimination); and more. We'll also read some classic works on political philosophy to give us some idea of what these cases might mean in the larger universe of political life.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 445. Eastern Europe: Revolution, Reaction, and Reform.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Paula May Pickering

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the on-going political transition of Eastern European states. After considering historical peculiarities and the state socialist system, we examine alternative explanations for state socialism's collapse. We then emphasize how transition there compares with political transitions that have occurred in Western Europe and Latin America. Specifically, we explore the role that political culture, elite-mass interaction, ethnic diversity, and outside intervention play in influencing political change in Eastern Europe today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 464. Public International Law.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Robert Anthony Bejesky

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course examines the law of the international community as it has been developed historically and recognized by modern states with special reference to the position of the United States.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

POLSCI 492. Directed Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science and permission of instructor and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. (1-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of directed study may be elected as part of a concentration program in Political Science. (INDEPENDENT). Political Science 491 and 492 may be elected for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

A directed study course on an individual research topic that is developed between an individual student and a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

POLSCI 592. Advanced Internship in Political Science.

Section 201 * CLASS TO TAKE PLACE IN WASHINGTON. D.C. DATES TO BE ANNOUNCED. THREE CREDIT HOURS.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science at the 400 level or above and concentration in political science; or graduate standing. Permission of supervising instructor and review by the Department's internship advisor. (2-6). (Excl). No more than four credits of internship may be included as part of a concentration plan in political science. (EXPERIENTIAL). All internship courses may be elected for a maximum total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-6).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


Graduate Course Listings for POLSCI.


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This page was created at 7:03 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


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