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Spring/Summer 2001 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2001) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology

This page was created at 7:05 PM on Fri, Jul 27, 2001.


Calendars

Spring Half-Term, 2001 (May 1 June 22)
Spring/Summer Term, 2001 (May 1 August 17)
Summer Half-Term, 2001 (June 27 August 17)


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Spring Half-Term

Spring/Summer Term

Summer Half-Term


Spring Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Spring Term '01 Time Schedule for Sociology


SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 101 Give Me Liberty or Give Me Death : An Introduction to Law & Freedom in American Life.

Instructor(s): Robert Yaw Adwere-Boamah

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Eric Foner (1998, p. xiii) recently noted that "no idea is more fundamental to Americans' sense of themselves as individuals and as a nation than freedom." This course surveys how we have historically conceptualized and socially organized the practice of freedom. In particular, this course examines the historical origins of 'natural rights' and how we have institutionalized these rights through our pursuit of constitutional democracy and the common law tradition. This course will intensively examine a select few legal cases in order to highlight the interaction and tension between the natural rights tradition, constitutionalism, democracy, and liberalism. This class will feature intensive discussions drawing from the weekly readings, occasional guest lectures, and engaging writing exercises.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.

Introductory courses

Section 101 SOCIOLOGY OF EVERYDAY LIFE.

Instructor(s): Frederique Anne Laubepin

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 400 or 401. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is designed to introduce students to sociological ways of studying and making sense of the organization and meaning of the everyday world the objects, events and landscapes that we encounter and negotiate daily, but often fail to problematize. Rather than offering a broad survey of the field, we will seek to understand and critically evaluate the major theories that have been advanced by sociologists to explain how individual experiences and actions in the realm of the mundane both reflect and constitute larger sometimes global social processes. While the course will focus on the contemporary United States, we will engage comparative and historical perspectives, as well as a range of sociological, anthropological, and ecological writings.

The course is organized around three sets of issues:

  • People: what are the forces at work behind everyday interactions, and how do everyday interactions come to constitute larger social trends? What is the meaning of individual experience in the (post)modem landscape of the everyday, and how have some social philosophies responded to problems of individual isolation and alienation?
  • Places: how does everyday space get invested with cultural meaning, and how does it shape everyday experiences and actions? How do the multiple levels of individual understanding, culture, planning, and markets combine to create the places we inhabit? How can we come to more fully see, appreciate, and critique everyday places?
  • Things: how are complex processes of history, culture, and class embedded in the objects we use, select, and cherish or discard? How are they tied to macro-ecological issues and to issues of the global marketplace?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 101 Homelessness in the United States.

Instructor(s): George R Carter Iii

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Homelessness is among the most visible and serious social problems facing the United States today. It is also a phenomena which has been given much attention in social science research. Although a large amount of the research on homelessness was done in the 1980s during the Reagan-era, studies on homelessness reach back to the 1890s and continue to the present day. My primary aim in this course is sharing what we have learned from this research and how it can shed light on how we understand homelessness today. Homelessness intersects with many other social problems and we will explore these intersections in detail. Learning about the determinants, dimensions, and consequences of homelessness will prepare you to participate in the ongoing debate over how best to address this serious social problem.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Joel A Purkiss

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stat. 100, 250, 265, 311, 350, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

In this course we will study the basics of quantitative data analysis. We will also learn some statistical computer skills using SPSS software. We will not use math beyond basic algebra, and you do not need previous statistical computing experience. Furthermore, you need not be a "math-oriented" person to do well in this course. However, you must have good study skills consistently attending class, reading assigned texts, and doing all assigned homework are all requirements, not options. Given the fast pace of the spring term, you must do all work and do it on time. If you come to class regularly and keep up with the coursework, you will learn basic statistics and earn a good grade along the way.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 303/AAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Chavella T Pittman

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or AAS. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: https://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2001/spring/soc/303/101.nsf

This course will focus on the socio-historical experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the This course will focus on the socio-historical experiences of various racial and ethnic groups in the United States. In addition to exploring theories which help us understand the structurally patterned history of these groups, the course will also focus on micro-level explanations of race and ethnic relations.

This course has three specific aims: 1)to help students develop a critical perspective on race and ethnic relations; 2) to expand students' knowledge of the history of racial and ethnic groups in the United States; 3) to help students develop an understanding of how individual perceptions and interactions across racial/ethnic differences are related to history.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 305. Introduction to Theories of Social Organization.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Byrapatna Mc Gowda

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 405. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course introduces students to select influential theoretical work done within sociology since its inception in nineteenth century Europe. It will begin with an examination of the writings of the earliest social theorists such as Comte and Spencer. The writings of early modern social theorists like Marx, Weber, Simmel, and Durkheim will occupy us in the next stage. Then, we will shift our focus to two important schools of social thought in the first half of the twentieth century: functionalism (Parsons, Merton) and neo-Marxism (Frankfurt School, Gramsci, Raymond Williams). Next, we will move on to consider the powerful interventions of feminist, "race" and postcolonial scholarship on sociology a focus on scholars working in these fields will have important implications for our understanding of the politics of canon building in sociology. Lastly, we will discuss important contemporary social theorists such as Bourdieu, Giddens, and Foucault. Clearly, we could do an entire course on each of the theorists mentioned above. However, this course mainly strives to provide a broad historical overview of the shifting trends in sociological theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 320/Psych. 310. Training in Processes of Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. Open to juniors and seniors. (3). (Excl). (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 101 Topic? (Credits?)

Instructor(s): Mark Chesler (mchesler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology 389 is known as "Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving. Students enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project. NOTE: All sections of Sociology 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available in the Fall and Winter terms. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations that provide mental health counseling and drug-abuse treatment. Limited opportunities are available in the Spring term.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 119 MCSP INTERNSHIP. (CREDITS?)

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

MCSP Internships

Seminar: Tuesdays 9am -12

3 credits

Couzens Hall NAL

Sociology 389 is known as Project Community. For Spring term, students will combine 12 hours of internship service in a community setting with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Student enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to compile reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project. Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

Section 119 Non-profit Organizations This internship experience will provide students with an opportunity to gain valuable experience and insight into non-profit organizations in health care (HARC HIV/Aids Resource Center) and community development (Focus Hope). Students will reflect on their service experience as they learn about the complex social issues facing their non-profit organizations. As a condensed course in spring term, the service learning experience will be more extended and intensive each week and will provide a deeper, more intensive internship-type educational experience for students.

The internship component for HARC will be late afternoons and early evenings on MW (3-7:30pm) and occasional Tuesdays (3-5pm). There will be one all-day volunteer orientation session and a 2-day weekend training session in early May. Students will participate in the community outreach/education work of HARC in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area.

The internship component for Focus Hope will take place on Mondays and on Wednesday or Thursday. Students will have an opportunity to work in the finance department and food distribution areas at Focus Hope in Detroit.

Enrollment priority is given to students in the Michigan Community Scholars Program. Other students may contact the MCSP office for enrollment consideration (Telephone: 734-647-4860).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Spring/Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Sociology


SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 001 * STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 2205 MICHIGAN TO OBTAIN OVERRIDE. credits?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

No Description Provided.

Check Times, Location, and Availability


SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Summer Half-Term Courses

Wolverine Access Subject listing for SOC

Summer Term '01 Time Schedule for Sociology


SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 201 Social Inequality.

Instructor(s): Susannah K Dolance

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 400. Seniors must elect Soc. 400. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in 195 or 400. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course is an introduction to sociology, the scientific study of social life. We will study sociological concepts and methods in a variety of contexts, with a particular focus on various theoretical explanations for social inequality in the United States. Through the study of inequality based on gender, sexuality, race and ethnicity, and class, students will learn to think and write critically about basic concepts of the discipline.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 201 SOCIAL INEQUALITIES AND SOCIAL JUSTICE THROUGH SCIENCE FICTION. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Julica Hermann

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Science fiction has always defined the 'cutting edge' of reality, and has creatively explored the limits and possibilities of societies and technology. At the same time, science fiction (like other art forms) reproduces and reifies cultural values and social norms. In this course, we will use science fiction (both literature and film) to explore utopian and dystopian visions of the future. We will compare these futuristic visions to contemporary social inequalities and new social justice movements in the United States. We will use science fiction to study what we usually take for granted in everyday life: the social processes and cultural values that support different forms of social organization and oppression. We will look at science fiction that reproduces current ideological frameworks, and compare it to science fiction that challenges our social norms. In doing so, we will address a series of sociological questions: Why do we conform? How do societies change? What chances do we have to 'succeed'? Why do people rebel? What kind of alternative futures do we face?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 202 THE PILL, THE PEA AND THE POD: REPRODUCTION IN THE UNITED STATES. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Kimberly Rae Andringa

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This course will explore current social issues related to both the social construction of reproduction and the delivery of reproductive health services in the contemporary United States. After a brief look at the social history of reproduction, we will examine the impact of the meanings given to reproduction for different groups on health care delivery, access to services, and legal rights. Specific topics to be covered include insurance coverage of and research around contraceptive methods, new reproductive technologies, maternal and fetal rights, conceptions of parenthood, and conscience clauses for providers. Special attention will be given to differential constructions and treatment based on race, age, class and sexual orientation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 303/AAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Sylvia Marie Orduno

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or AAS. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

This class will examine racial and ethnic relations in a variety of historical settings, mostly in the U .S., and examine the multiple ways that these relations can be analyzed and understood. The course will begin by exploring the historical structuring of racial and ethnic hierarchy in this country, and the ideologies that have contributed to a system of stratification and privilege. Close examination will also be paid to the social construction of race, its relationship to class, and the role of the state in determining racial and ethnic categories. An in-depth review will examine the historical accounts of African Americans in the Northern and Southern regions of the U.S., as well as Mexican Americans in the West and Southwest. Attention will also be paid to the experiences of Native Americans, Asian Americans, other Latino and Caribbean populations, European American ethnic groups, and Jews. The course will also examine the origin and status of current sociopolitical policies and programs across the nation that address real and perceived racial and ethnic inequality; and we will seek to develop ways in which to move beyond these categories of difference.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Carla Parry (parryc@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

Sociology 310 provides an introduction to the logic and methods of social research. The primary objectives of the course are:

  • to explore the logic/rationale guiding social research
  • to introduce students to a variety of research methods used in the social sciences
  • to provide students with the tools to critically evaluate sociological research.

The methodologies explored will include qualitative methods (observation and interviews), quantitative/multivariate methods (survey research), and comparative historical research. This is an experiential learning course your research projects will be based on the collection and/or analysis of 'real' data. Computer labs are required for the portion of the course that deals with survey data and statistical analysis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Sociology 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

For students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Graduate students should elect Sociology 995.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 472/Psych. 381. Advanced Laboratory in Social Psychology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Stat. 350 (or 402) and Psych. 380. (3). (Excl).

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No Homepage Submitted.

See Psychology 381.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


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