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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in CAAS

This page was created at 7:26 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


CAAS 303 / SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

African-American Studies

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or AAS; AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 303.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 418 / POLSCI 419. Black Americans and the Political System.

African-American Studies

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Ruth Nicole Brown (nikkib@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Two courses in political science. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Political Science 419.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


CAAS 203. Issues in Afro-American Development.

African-American Studies

Section 101 Afro-Cuba Hip Hop.

Instructor(s): Umi Vaughan (umiv@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 111. (3). (SS). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course Afro-Cuba Hip Hop is a dance class with a difference. Students will learn key concepts in African Diaspora music and dance through lecture demonstrations, films, and excerpts from texts. Students will explore the relationship between music, movement, and community in African Diaspora cultures. Dance styles will be culled from Cuba, Haiti, Dominican Republic, Jamaica, Brazil and the United States extending from Afro-Cuban liturgical dance to hip hop. The mutually influencing spheres of sacred and secular dance and music will be discussed and compared as well. By the end of the course students will be familiar with basic concepts in African Diaspora music and dance (e.g., call and response, improvisation, etc.), be able to identify and analyze trends therein, and have learned a choreography based on the movements taught in class.

Course Readings:

  • Daniels, Yvonne. 1995. Dance and Social Change in Contemporary Cuba. Bloomington: Indiana University Press.
  • Guibault,Jocelyne. Zouk: World Music in the West Indies. Chicago: University of Chicago Press.
  • Guillermoprieto,Alma. 1990. Samba. New York: Knopf.
  • Manuel,Peter. 1995. Caribbean Currents: Caribbean Music from Rumba to Reggae. Philadelphia: Temple University Press.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 101 Black Nationalism and Pan Africanism: The Nineteenth-Century Intellectual Politics of Transnational Negotiations of Colonial Situations.

Instructor(s): Tracey Keith Flemming

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The complexity of scholarly approaches focusing on or relating to Black nationalism and Black intellectual history have revealed that issues of "race," class, gender and sexuality have been central to Black imaginings of identification, representation, nation and/or self-determination. Ideological responses to (white) racist oppression in the United States and abroad have prominently figured within such imaginaries. It is also important to note that much of Black efforts to end racist oppression and Black (usually male) efforts to (re) structure and/or control Black communities are in many ways indicative of both the significance and implications of such discourses. Thus, the focus of this interdisciplinary course will not only consider "Black" (in the broadest, non-national sense) nationalist intellectual production and the effects of an responses to (white) racialism, but we will also explore the very core, or logic, of hegemonic discourses. The discourses of the nineteenth-century were not located in a vacuum, as all of those who participated within intellectual life knew-from the most "credible" to the weakest sources of knowledge.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 102 Introduction to the Musics of Africa

Instructor(s): Matthew Lavoie

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will introduce students to a variety of African musical traditions. Through an examination of the historical development, creative processes of innovation and performance, and the social contexts of music-making students will explore the particularities that make different traditions unique, while simultaneously gaining an appreciation for how these styles are related. Through our investigation of musical styles such as the Congolese rumba, Senegalese mbalax, the Mande music of Guinea and Mali, the Semba of Angola, the Andalusian music of Morocco and Algeria, and African hip-hop from throughout the continent we will look at how music is used to record history, practice religion, articulate identities (personal, local, national, and international), and advance political agendas. Students will also be introduced to the some of the relationships between African musical traditions and those of the African diaspora.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 327 / PSYCH 315. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

African-American Studies

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Denis Ugwuegbu (dcugwueg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies).

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to equip students, through lectures, group discussions, and discovery, with the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge, skills, and technique that will enable them to carry out social psychological research in African environment. The course is aimed at the upper-level undergraduate students in Psychology, African-American and African Studies, and other related social science disciplines. The principles underlying the collection of scientific research data remain the same but the cultural influence under which scientific research data is collected must be taken into consideration if a researcher is to collect valid and reliable research information. The discussion begins with examination of the status of psychology and social psychological research in Africa, factors that impede the development of psychology and social psychological research in the African setting, and the responsibilities of a social psychological researcher to the African subjects. We also will discuss the traditional African approaches to the generation of knowledge. The student will further learn how to plan psychological and social research in Africa, the use of sampling techniques in African setting, how to recruit and train field workers, interviewers, and how to obtain data that are reliable, valid, and have external validity from a non-Western population such as Africa. Finally, the course will assess the contributions of social psychological research to social change in Africa.

A textbook and course pack will be used for the course. Student assessment will comprise of attendance, class participation, midterm and final examinations, and field research experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 333. Perspectives in Afro-American History.

African-American Studies

Section 101 AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: HISTORICAL FOUNDATIONS CONTEMPORARY MEANING.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In looking at the law and policy components of the contemporary debate, we will examine the legal foundations of the issue beginning with its Reconstruction origins and continuing on through the court challenges that define the issue today. In looking at the subject in its broad cultural and historical significance, we will examine affirmative action as the most recent phase of a long running debate in America over power, position, and access. The ultimate goal is to see the issue as a reflection of the on-going struggle played out in legal, historical and sociocultural arenas over inclusion and exclusion in American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 338 / ENGLISH 320. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Shani Mott (stmott@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU). (African-American Studies).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine the ways in which both Black and white American authors between 1925 and 1950 engage questions of America, race, classism, and sexuality by either writing novels in which the central characters are different from the author's own racial background, or by writing blackness as fleeting or marginal to the plot. During this inter war period, there are a number of Black authors who write all white characters, white authors who experiment with all Black characters, and others who use the idea and image of blackness to write about their own sexuality. This course is ultimately about challenging our assumptions about what it means for literature to be race or race-neutral. What constitutes American Literature? Although we will focus primarily on fiction, we will also be engaged with how literary scholars have written about these texts. Moreover, we will use Critical Race Theory and Whiteness Studies as tools to better understand and explore the literary techniques that authors use as a way to engage questions of identify formation.

Required Texts:

  • F. Scott Fitzgerald, The Great Gatsby (1925)
  • Zora Neale Hurston, Seraph on the Suwqnee (1948)
  • George Schuyler, Black No More (1931)
  • Carl Van Vechten, Nigger Heaven (1926)
  • Lilian Smith, Strange Fruit (1944)
  • Blair Niles, Strange Brother (1931)
  • Toni Morrison, Playing in the Dark: Whitness and the Literary Imagination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 340 / AMCULT 340. A History of Blacks in American Film.

African-American Studies

Section 101 THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE.

Instructor(s): Melba J Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the developing and burgeoning film industry emerging from the African American experience and/or its cultural context. It considers the historical circumstances that have impeded a reasonable representation of Black Americans in American cinema, while investigating the forms and styles expressed in independent and commercial productions. This includes an historical overview, but focuses on more recent works since the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s and '70s. Both documentary and feature films are examined and considered in terms of their cinematic techniques and aesthetic characteristics as well as for their social and political themes. The course will consider major Black directors and will attempt to view at least one of their works, and preview others. There will also be a comparative analysis of the feature and the documentary on Malcolm X. The examination and discussion of the films will require the use of cinematic vocabulary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 101 Spring Studio, May 1 June 30, in Kumasi and Accra, Ghana.

Instructor(s): James Chaffers (chaffers@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Ghana Studio is sited in Kumasi in the highlands of Central Ghana and in the capital city of Accra, along the Atlantic ocean shore. The studio is organized in collaboration with faculty and students of the Department of Architecture, Kwame Nkrumah University of Science & Technology (Kumasi) and with Anthropology faculty at the University of Ghana (Accra). Studio members typically engage projects of urban scale or projects that focus on village development. In both opportunities, the aim will be to generate a fresh architectural synthesis; specifically, a synthesis of design linkages that might exist between the actual physicality of 3-dimensional space and the unbounded and existential spirituality of human aspiration. This broader pedagogical approach to architecture allows the studio to engage issues of tectonics and ecological sustainability in ways that encourage the widest exploration of design possibilities. CAAS concentrators who have a general interest in comparative urban studies and/or a particular interest in West African cultural histories and relationships would profit from this common studio experience. The program will be sited in Kumasi and Accra, where students will live in University Guest Houses and study in Ghana's two largest cities. Class instruction will be supplemented with field trips throughtout Ghana and with excursions to key sites in neighboring West African countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of the Instructor.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

CAAS 510. Supervised Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Graduate standing or permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission of the concentration advisor.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Arrangements may be made for adequately prepared students to undertake individual study under the direction of a departmental staff member. Students are provided with the proper section number by the staff member with whom the work has been arranged.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring/Summer Term Courses


Graduate Course Listings for CAAS.


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This page was created at 7:26 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.

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