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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in American Culture

This page was created at 7:26 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


AMCULT 100. What is an American?

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Catherine E Daligga (cdaligga@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be an American? Since the attacks of September 11, 2001, this question has returned to national discussion with a new urgency. Can we tell by how someone looks, where someone was born, or what language someone speaks, whether that person is "truly" American? Or, is being American related more closely to one's personal beliefs and ideals, including one's religious practice and affiliation? If we, as citizens, owe some loyalty to our country, what in turn does our country owe to us? Do countries have any obligations to non-citizens? Some claim that America, thanks to its legal system, traditions, and social customs, is the best place in the world to live. What grounds, if any, are there for making such claims? Our main goal will be to consider historical and contemporary notions of American–ness as they relate to issues of territory, behavior, language, group identity and affiliation. In this course, we will examine questions like these from the perspectives of several disciplines, including history, sociology, law, public policy, and media studies. The materials we will use come from autobiographies, interviews, movies, legislation and other legal documents, photographs, stories, and songs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 204. Themes in American Culture.

Section 201 – Place, Space & American Culture.

Instructor(s): Jennifer R Beckham (beckhamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will survey several important approaches to the study of American Culture through the analysis of space and place to explore roles their physical world has in defining culture. We will focus particular attention on the ways geography and the production of space cut across issues of race, class, sexuality and gender. Among our concerns with be historical factors that shape American space and processes by which we construct and endow places with meaning. Reading fiction and scholarly works, we will cover four general areas: spaces of leisure and service, spaces of mobility, residential spaces, and virtual worlds. While considerations will include issues that concern architecture and urban planning students, this course is designed for students with little or no background in these areas. Some examples of questions we will ask and begin to answer include the following: In what ways are freeways political? What does the design of a Caribbean tourist resort have to do with New World exploration and a colonial past? How does one come to "recognize" places, South Central Los Angeles for example, without ever having been there and what are the implications of such recognition? We will approach these questions will entail readings and discussions. Because visual representation and the physicality of space are important components of the dynamics of space and power, this course will include at least one in-class film screening and a fieldtrip to Detroit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 201 – Interdisciplinary Study of Management.

Instructor(s): Paul K Ching

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Multi-national corporations, schools, hospitals, governments, non-profits are all "managed". Yet what is management and can it be taught? Why is it assumed that management techniques are "generic" and applicable in such a wide variety of contexts? Is management a powerful, necessary means of focusing resources that accomplishes greater good or a means of control and domination that requires the subordination of individual needs for the larger group? This course will examine these questions through readings, lectures, films and discussions that will underscore the ways that these management has been shaped by social, technological, political and cultural contexts.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 210. Introduction to Ethnic Studies.

Section 201 – Find Asian-Am Contemp Lit&Film.

Instructor(s): Grace Wang (wangg@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated with permission for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 240 / WOMENSTD 240. Introduction to Women's Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Women's Studies 240.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 201 – PRACTICUM IN THE MULTICULTURAL COMMUNITY. 3 CREDIT HOURS. INTERNSHIP WIL BE SCHEDULED 2 AFTERNOONS A WEEK FOR 4 HRS. EACH. MEETS WITH PSYCH. 305-201.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu) , Edna Brown (eebrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 342 / HISTORY 368 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See History 368.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


AMCULT 201. American Values.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Richard Meisler (rmeisler@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (HU). Laboratory fee required.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

According to Webster's Ninth Collegiate Dictionary, a "value" is "something (as a principle or quality) intrinsically desirable or valuable." When people matter-of-factly refer to "American values" as "freedom," "the American Way," "the American Dream," "God, Family and Country," and "the Puritan work ethic," what are they taking about? Why are these "values" assumed to be linked to a particular national identity? This course explores the cultural history of ideas of Americanness and American "values" with respect to: religion, family and gender; race, nation and democratic citizenship; labor, class and capitalism. We will be considering how and why "values" have gained prominence, and how they have been rewritten, challenged, appropriated, and reanimated at differnt moments in history by a variety of groups falling under the rubric of "Americans." We will be examining primary and secondary sources, including essays, speeches, cartoons, captivity narratives, poems, novels, and film.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 101 – Leisure in American Culture.

Instructor(s): Theresa Poole

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will critically examine both historical and contemporary leisure sites and practices, including children's toys, sports, tourism, amusement parks, restaurants, and malls. The course reading list is interdisciplinary--drawing from history, literature, anthropology, sociology, public health and journalism. We will primarily deploy a cultural studies framework to guide our inquiry. This means that we will, first, pay particular attention to issues of race, class, and gender as they intersect with cultural practices. Second, it means we will think about how certain leisure activities serve as a means of maintaining or legitimating power differences as well as how they might serve as a means of contesting or challenging those power differences. We especially will be interested to consider the social and political consequences of particular leisure experiences. To this end, we will think about how participating in particular leisure activities teaches us certain cultural lessons on a variety of topics, including how to be "proper" citizens, men, women, workers and consumers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 206. Themes in American Culture.

Section 102 – Latina/o Popular Music (s) in the Age of Globalization

Instructor(s): Wilson Valentin (wilsonva@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). Laboratory fee required. May be repeated for credit with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed to analyze the recent national and global "Latin music boom" within a historical and cultural studies perspective. With the United States now recognized as the fifth-largest Spanish-speaking nation in the world, the emergence of Latina/o popular culture and music has "tropicalized" its local, national, and international sense of itself with bilingual/inter-lingual practices and polyrhythmic percussive music(s). Interestingly, forty percent of all Puerto Ricans live in the United States and close to a half a million Dominican immigrants and citizens claim New York City as their home, while an equal number of Salvadorans reside in Los Angeles. This may help to explain why Main-Street America now recognizes Carlos Santana, Marc Anthony, Jennifer Lopez, and Ricky Martin as prominent "American" musicians and artists. While once contained within marginal locations, markets, and venues, Latina/o popular music -- aided by the financial support and distribution of multinational music labels (Columbia, EMI, etc) – is now an important element of Pacific, European, West African and Middle-Eastern soundscapes: we can listen and dance to Salsa in Japan, Latin Jazz in France, and Latin Pop in Israel. The proliferation of Latin music may help to explain why "Latin" music sales grew from 600 million units in 1998 and to nearly 1 billion in 1999. This globalizing of Latina/o popular music is a backdrop for an analysis and interrogation of processes critical to U.S. Latino cultural formations, such as (im)migration, diaspora, nation building, and subaltern transnational practices and identities. The course will focus first on processes of globalization and critique overreliance on the local/global dyad. That critique will be followed by a comprehensive examination of diasporic Latina/o popular musics, such as Latin Pop, Salsa, Bomba, Plena, Hip-Hop, Bachata, Merengue, Spanish rock and Tex-Mex. The course materials will include various articles and essays from books such as Frances Aparicio's Listening to Salsa, Patria Roman-Velázquez' The Making of Latin London, Juan Flores' From Bomba to Hip-Hop, Paul Austerlitz' The Dominican Merengue, Deborah Pacini Hernández' Bachata: A Social History of a Dominican Popular Music, George Lipsitz'Dangerous Crossroads: Popular Music, Postmodernism and the Poetics of Place, Marta E. Savigliano's Tango and the Political Economy of Passion, Manuel Pena's The Texas-Mexican Conjunto, Lise Waxer's Situating Salsa: Global Markets and Local Meanings in Latin Popular Music, and David Reyes and Tom Waldman's Land of a Thousand Dances: Chicano Rock 'n' Roll from Southern California. Weekly seminar discussions will encompass collective student dialogue, multimedia presentations, and guest speakers. Course requirements will include mandatory attendance and participation in the weekly seminar discussions, short response papers, student presentations, a mid-term and final paper. There are no prerequisites for the course, however knowledge in Latina/o studies, cultural history, and/or Ethnic Studies will provide a fundamental grounding that will facilitate course readings and class discussions. LAB FEE

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 309. Learning through Community Practice.

Section 101 – PRACTICUM IN THE MULTICULTURAL COMMUNITY. 3 CREDITS. MEETS W/PSYCH 305-101.

Instructor(s): Lorraine M Gutierrez (lorraing@umich.edu) , Edna Brown (eebrown@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). Laboratory fee required. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (1-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 340 / CAAS 340. A History of Blacks in American Film.

Section 101 – THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE.

Instructor(s): Melba J Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 340.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 421 / SOC 423. Social Stratification.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Sociology 423.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring/Summer Term Courses


AMCULT 323. Intermediate Ojibwa.

Courses in Ojibwa

Section 001.

Instructor(s): Irving N McCue

Prerequisites & Distribution: Amer. Cult. 322 and permission of the American Culture Program Director. (3). (LR).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 383. Junior Honors Reading and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and grade point average of at least 3.0. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Reading of selected works on American Culture. Conferences, written reports, and term papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 388. Field Study.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sophomore standing. (1-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AMCULT 389. Reading Course in American Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit with permission.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent study course available to undergraduates who are interested in designing a reading list for the purpose of exploring new areas in the field of American Studies. Each student makes individual arrangements with a faculty member in the student's area of interest.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 489. Senior Essay.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrators and Amer. Cult. 350. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is designed for concentrators who desire a more directed research experience with individual faculty at the end of their undergraduate career. It allows a senior concentrator in American Culture the opportunity to write a research paper under the direction of a particular faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

AMCULT 493. Honors Readings and Thesis.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior standing and a grade point average of at least 3.5 in Honors concentration. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent interdisciplinary study supervised by two or more tutors leading to an original paper. A grade is not posted until the end of the second term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for AMCULT.


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This page was created at 7:27 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.

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