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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Cultural Anthropology

This page was created at 11:41 AM on Thu, Jun 13, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


ANTHRCUL 296. Topics in Archaeology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 – Africa and the West: The Archaeology of Culture Contact.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will use archaeological evidence to examine early interactions between Africans and Euro-Americans, both in Africa and in the Americas. Where Africans the passive recipients of European culture and technology as traditional views would have us believe? What can archaeological evidence reveal about the interactions between Africans, Europeans, and Americans (including Native Americans) that other kinds of evidence can not? Students will learn why archaeology is a useful method for studying culture contact. In addition, students will learn to think critically about modern representations of Africans, Europeans, and Americans.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 201 – The Anthropology of Health and Illness.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this class is to explore central anthropological tenets through the examination of the relationship between health, society and culture. The material we read is designed to question the assumption that health and illness are fundamentally and most importantly the product of an individual's biology. Rather, through an examination of the relationship between biology, science, medicine and culture, it will be argued that our treatment of disease cannot advance until the social aspects of medicine and illness are understood. After encountering the culturally constructed aspects of both biomedicine and illness, the ideal role of public health in a multi-cultural society will be explored.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 202 – Anthropology of Youth: Kids, Culture, and Transformation.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Since the eighteenth century, youth has often been understood as a time of happiness, innocence, and closeness to nature distinct from adulthood. At the same time, many writers, activists, and policymakers have witnessed young people in conditions of violence, toil, and poverty, and they have spoken of "children at risk" or even "children without childhood."

How can we make sense of these potrayals of young people's lives? Do the worries about "children without childhood" offer a picture contrary to the romantic view of youth, or do they instead subscribe to it? How did ideas about a separate and happy childhood become so prevalent in the first place, and how do they compare with young people's everyday experiences in the contemporary world? How are the local changes in young people's lives related to global economic and cultural transformations? What roles are currently envisioned for young people at home, in public space, in schools, in various forms of labor, in popular culture and consumerism, in diaspora, and in politics?

This course will examine these and other questions through class readings, film excerpts, discussions, and other assignments. It will build on recent literature as well as "classics of the field" to demonstrate that youth and young people have been abiding themes of anthropological concern. In addition, the course introduces a cultural studies perspective as a way to combine ethnographic approaches with alternative analyses of popular cultural production and consumption.

Throughout the course, a key point of emphasis will be that young people are simultaneously "made" in culture and "makers" of it. They are not passive recipients of tradition, but resourceful and inventive social actors who both inherit and re-create ways of acting, thinking, and feeling. Participants will be encouraged to examine their own experiences of youth in a critical light and to compare them with those of the young in other contexts. Course materials range far afield to address young people's experiences in Brazil, Great Britain, Germany, South Africa, Turkey, and Japan, but they also deal with cultural products and events that are "close to home" for many of us---like MTV and the high school prom.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 203 – Bambi, Birkenstocks, and Buckshot: An Anthropology of Hunting in the Modern United States.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Anthropologists usually think about hunting in terms of "primitive" societies. But what can we learn from examining this important activity in modern North America? What does hunting as a form of practical knowledge about the world reveal about social structure and politics in post-industrial Michigan? What ideas about class, gender and race are attached to hunting in the U.S.? How does hunting relate to images of "America," especially to concerns with tradition, progress, nature, rugged individualism and self-sufficiency?

Come join us in considering these issues in "Bambi, Birkenstocks and Buckshot." We will explore a wide range of sources and locations including popular films such as Predator, Silence of the Lambs, Escanaba in Da Moonlight and Psycho; The Writings of Teddy Roosevelt; Michigan hunting songs; Ted Nugent's lyrics and writings; Michigan factory floors; Cabela's Sporting Goods Store; museums; gun clubs and game farms; and taxidermy studios in our ethnographic and classroom studies this summer. Remember, this is not a class about supporting or condemning hunting, but about exploring its social significance.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 201 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 202 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 487. UM Training Program in Archaeology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (6). (Excl).

Credits: (6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


ANTHRCUL 101. Introduction to Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Rachel Caspari (rcaspari@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Primarily for first- and second-year students. (4). (SS). (R&E). Does not count toward anthropology concentration requirements.

R&E

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 – Indigenous Peoples of Latin America.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an ethnographic and historical examination of the relationship of indigenous peoples of the Latin America to the nation–states in which they have lived since the conquest. We will attempt to answer questions such as: What political and economic factors have shaped the integration of indigenous peoples into Latin American nations? How have ideological constructions of "Indianess" by Latin American elites and by indigenous peoples themselves changed over time? What have been the various strategies and reactions of indigenous people to government policy? How have states, in turn, reacted to the mobilization of indigenous communities? What are some of the ways in which indigenous peoples have understood their situation vis-à-vis the government and elites? How have contemporary trends toward "democratization" and liberalization in Latin America changed the lives of indigenous peoples? In addressing these questions (and others), special attention will be given to the cases of Mexico, Colombia and Peru.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 102 – The Anthropology of Global Popular Culture.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In recent decades, globalization has entailed the movement of people, products and ideas throughout the world to an unprecedented degree and at a feverish pace. American cultural products are now seemingly everywhere, but how the people of the world view, use and understand them is much more complicated than is commonly presented. In this course we will go beyond models of rational consumer choice and cultural imperialism to examine how icons of American culture, like McDonald's, Baywatch, and MTV, have been understood, interpreted and redefined in other cultural settings. We will also look at how popular culture itself is differently produced and understood in other parts of the world, and sometimes even marketed back to Americans, for example as world music. Course assignments will include anthropological studies of globalization, popular culture, cultural imperialism and consumer culture in Brazil, Israel, Algeria, Indonesia, Nepal, India, Taiwan, China, South Korea, the Netherlands, England, France and the USA. We will sample many of these global cultural offering in class, watching movies and television shows and listening to music, and will make a field trip to a local fast food restaurant.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 298. Topics in Cultural Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 103 – Doing Anthropology: Finding, Collecting & Reporting Cultural Stories.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is culture? Where do you look to find it? And how do you represent it to others? In this course, we will experience doing what anthropologists do by practicing basic tools of "ethnographic" research (observation, note-taking, interviewing, visual and audio recording, mapping, collecting) and writing (drafting, editing for ideas, choices of format/style). Through careful watching and listening, visual and audio recording, and writing, students will investigate, document, and try to faithfully report on their own and other people's lives (and the many forces that shape them). We will pay attention to ethical and political issues: Does it matter who is telling whose stories? How does observing and representing people's lives affect the observer, the observed? The course will consist of readings, exercises, discussions, and a final, independent documentary project. The classroom will be participatory and collaborative, and students should be prepared to share their own work and experiences, and give constructive feedback to classmates on theirs.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 299. Topics in Linguistic Anthropology.

Introductory Courses

Section 101 – Storytelling in Cross-Cultural Perspective.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Ann Dickinson (jdcknson@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will examine the social and linguistic importance of stories and storytelling in different cultures, drawing on such diverse materials as myths and fairy tales, court testimony, jokes, life stories, and stories in conversation. Among the questions we will discuss are: What are stories, and what activities constitute storytelling? Are stories told in every culture? How are stories and storytelling similar or different across cultures? Can storytelling play a role in the building of group and individual identities? Course materials analyze storytelling by children and adults from numerous ethnic groups, in rural and urban settings from the U.S. and throughout the world, including Appalachia, Mississippi, New York, Arizona, Italy, Mexico, Ukraine, and Samoa. Class meetings will balance lectures, active discussion, group activities, and student presentations. Requirements for the course include five short field assignments in which students will collect and analyze stories, and two exams.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 101 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 102 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring/Summer Term Courses


ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 001 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For information about honors work in anthropology, see the Honors Program description preceding the listing of anthropology courses or consult with the honors concentration advisor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ANTHRCUL 398. Honors in Cultural Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Section 002 – Topic?

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits with permission of concentration advisor.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRCUL 499. Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Museum, Honors, Reading, Research, and Field Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRCUL.


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