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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Asian Studies

This page was created at 7:27 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


ASIAN 251 / CHIN 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture.

Section 201 East Asian Thought.

Instructor(s): Robert Bruce Rama

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Chinese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252 / JAPANESE 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 201 Disaster in Modern Japanese Culture.

Instructor(s): Alex Bates (batesa@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Disasters disrupt everyday living and change our perceptions of the world around us. They affect more than merely those immediately impacted, and often become cultural traumas to be dealt with by the entire nation or even the world. Japan, like any other nation, has had its share of war and disasters during the last century. The twentieth century began with a war victory that firmly established Japn as a modern nation, the Russo-Japanese War. Then, as Japan was enjoying its status as a modern nation, the Great Earthquake of 1923 devastated Tokyo. The middle of the century saw a worldwide disaster in World War II and the destruction of Hiroshima and Nagasaki by atomic bombs. The growth following the war saw another type of disaster, environmental disaster that went hand in hand with the rapid industrial 'progress' of the nation. The century closed with another earthquake and a terrorist attack on the Tokyo subways.

This course will examine the cultural production that has arisen from such historical disasters as well as imagined disasters, such as Godzilla destroying Tokyo. Questions we will be asking include: How can disasters be represented? What is the difference between man-made and natural disasters? What is the role of the survivor? the artist? What makes a disaster a cultural trauma? How do nations and individuals come to terms with disaster that goes beyond the boudns of the ordinary?

Japan is not unique in its experience of disasters, but the constant threat of earthquakes and the devastation of World War II leave traces on the cultural memory. We will explore these cultural traces and perhaps learn more about our reaction to the disasters in our past as well as those we face today.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

ASIAN 511. Colloquium on Southern Asia: The Interface of the Humanities and the Social Sciences.

Section 511.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl).

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring Half-Term Courses


ASIAN 250 / BUDDHST 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Buddhist Studies.

Section 101 Religions of the Silk Road.

Instructor(s): Amanda Goodman (akgoodma@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of an Asian language required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the study of the religious traditions that flourished along the ancient Silk Road. Over the course of the term we will explore a number of traditions, inculding Zoroastrianism, Judiasm, Buddhism, Manichaeism, Nestorian Christianity, and Islam, and the influence those traditions had on the communities they touched. At the same time, we will draw on a variety of disciplinary perspectives (history, anthropology, and so on) to examine some of the underlying notions bound up in the grouping together of such vast areas and times under a single heading.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252 / JAPANESE 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 101 Nature and Environment in Japanese Literature and Film.

Instructor(s): Hoyt Long (hoytlong@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Paintings of Mt. Fuji, poems about the changing seasons, the elegant Japanese garden - many see these as evidence that love of nature is an integral part of Japanese culture. Yet what sort of "nature" do we find in traditional poems and gardens, and is it the same "nature" as in the West? Would a rural farmer see the same "nature" as the urban poet or gardner? And if nature is so loved by the Japanese, why is Japan considered one of the world's most polluted countries? In this course we will tackle these difficult questions by looking at representations of nature and environment in the works of famous writers and in modern film. The tools of "ecological criticism" will help us look for "nature" in these works, and our exploration of various genres (poetry, fairy tales, science fiction) and different historical periods will show how the concept of "nature" is culturally constructed, how its meaning changes with time and place, and how those changes reflect transformations in the actual human/nature relationship. Particular attention will be given to modern works that uncover some of the origins and possible remedies for Japan's (and perhaps even our own) environmental crisis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 252 / JAPANESE 250. Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture.

Section 102 Genji in Japanese Literature.

Instructor(s): Jeremy Roland Robinson

Prerequisites & Distribution: No knowledge of Japanese language is required. (3). (HU). May be repeated with department permission.

Foreign Lit

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring/Summer Term Courses


ASIAN 499. Independent Study-Directed Readings.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for ASIAN.


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This page was created at 7:28 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.

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