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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Communication Studies

This page was created at 7:29 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


COMM 321. Undergraduate Internship.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, concentration in communication studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. No more than six credits combined of Comm. Studies 321 and 322 may be elected.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Communication Studies concentrators who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Student assessment will be based on the academic merit of the work and evaluation of the final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for original, individualized student research under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with the faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


COMM 321. Undergraduate Internship.

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing, concentration in communication studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged. (1-3). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. May not be used to satisfy communication studies electives in a communication studies concentration plan. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated for a total of six credits. No more than six credits combined of Comm. Studies 321 and 322 may be elected.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Communication Studies concentrators who have reached junior standing may receive some amount of experiential course credit for an internship. Student assessment will be based on the academic merit of the work and evaluation of the final paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 101 SUPREME COURT NEWS COVERAGE.

Instructor(s): Anthony C Collings (collings@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 102 Rule of Law in Journalism.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will study the intersection of journalism and the rule of law. Students will be introduced to the history and evolution of the First Amendment, government attempts to curtail free speech during times of political crisis, and the ground breaking advances for press freedom under New York Times vs. Sullivan and other seminal cases. The course will allow students to develop a philosophy about the role of a journalist who works in a democracy and with the benefits of the rule of law; understand that laws govern the craft of journalism and give rise to tensions; and gain an appreciation for legal journalism that tells human stories and critically analyzes the media.

Mr. Ghannam's research and professional interests include the intersection of journalism and the rule of law, international and legal affairs reporting. His work has most recently appeared in The Boston Globe. He is a consultant to the Washington, DC-based International Center for Journalists, which conducts training in 70 countries to promote independent journalism. He spent nearly 10 years as a staff writer at the Detroit Free Press where his duties included serving as an assistant Nation/World and Metro editor. He has also reported for the American Bar Association Journal, Time magazine, the New York Times, and United Press International.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 439. Seminar in Journalistic Performance.

Section 103 Media & Ethno-Religious Conflict.

Instructor(s): Javed Nazir (jnazir@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on challenges related to media coverage in societies beset with ethnic and religious conflicts. The focus will primarily be on countries like Afghanistan and Pakistan. These two countries have witnessed a phenomenal upsurge in ethnic and religious violence, impinging on communication and information flow. Journalists seek objectivity and truth, confronting an extremely hostile environment often at considerable risk to their lives. Alongside, the course studies identical problems elsewhere in the world with a focus on Middle East and former ethnicity-convulsed Yugoslavia. How well journalists, both international and local, cope with these challenges is another key dimension of the course. Since linguistic, religious, and cultural diversity impact on the contents of mass communication, the course provides some insight into the structure and operation of the media in these countries.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 441. Independent Reading.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 442. Independent Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of department. (3-4). (Excl). No more than four credits may be included in a Communication concentration. (INDEPENDENT). Comm. Studies 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

Credits: (3-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for original, individualized student research under the direction of a faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with the faculty member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

COMM 458. Special Topics in Media Systems.

Section 101 Reporting on War.

Instructor(s): Jeffrey Ghannam (ghannamj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will examine how the attacks on the United States and the war on terrorism were reported differently, or in lock step, by various media. Special emphasis will be placed on First Amendment law, the role of the independent journalist, journalism ethics, government attempts at censorship, and media self-censorship in contrast to the Vietnam experience. Students will weigh journalistic duty against national security, classified information, and increased government surveillance and its impact on public information. This course will also consider the impact of Al-Jazeera satellite TV and the conflicts confronting publicly-traded media companies that must strive for mass appeal, profits, truth, and accuracy.

Mr. Ghannam's research and professional interests include the intersection of journalism and the rule of law, international and legal affairs reporting. His work has most recently appeared in The Boston Globe. He is a consultant to the Washington, DC-based International Center for Journalists, which conducts training in 70 countries to promote independent journalism. He spent nearly 10 years as a staff writer at the Detroit Free Press where his duties included serving as an assistant Nation/World and Metro editor. He has also reported for the American Bar Association Journal, Time magazine, the New York Times, and United Press International.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 479. Seminar in Media and Culture.

Section 101 Video Games: Content, Industry, and Policy.

Instructor(s): Dmitri Williams (dcwillia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 351 or 371 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course has been designed as a broad, but intensive introduction to the medium and history of video games. Gender, age, and identity issues will be highlighted. Students will examine video games as aesthetic products, cultural products, economic outputs, as a policy issue, as possible sources of effects, and as sites of community. Such a varying set of issues requires a highly interdisciplinary approach. As a result, the course will draw upon the fundamentals of business and economics, sociology, social psychology, narrative theory, history, policy analysis, cultural studies, and even some computer science.

Students need not have prior experience in these areas but must demonstrate a willingness to learn several approaches. Students should also be aware that the interdisciplinary nature of the course will make it more challenging than most, but will in turn offer more to the student over the course of the term. Students expecting an easy course consisting of playing and talking about games will be disappointed.

The course will meet MWF 2:00-4:00 during the Spring term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

COMM 489. Seminar in Media Effects.

Media, Sex, and the Body.

Instructor(s): Jennifer Stevens-Aubrey (stevensz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Comm. Studies 361 or 381 strongly recommended. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Does Dawson's Creek make adolescents more sexual? Do Victoria's Secret catalogues shape how women feel about their bodies? In the last 20 years, a great deal of research in the field of media effects has examined the impact of media exposure on audiences' thoughts, feelings, attitudes, and behaviors regarding their bodies and their sexuality. In this course, we will examine this research and corresponding social scientific theory. Topics covered in this course will include media's effects on body image, body satisfaction, eating disorders, the sexual self-concept, and sexual permissiveness, as well as the media's portrayals of these topics. The aim of this course is to provide students with the tools to critically evaluate the assumptions behind the theories, methods, and conclusions presented in the research and to suggest new ways to add knowledge to these topics.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses


Graduate Course Listings for COMM.


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This page was created at 7:29 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.

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