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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History

This page was created at 7:32 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


HISTORY 111. Modern Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 201.

Instructor(s): M Koreman

Prerequisites & Distribution: Hist. 110 is recommended as prerequisite. (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In 1715 Europeans couldn't even imagine many of the things that their descendants take for granted today. Average men and women, especially women, had no opportunity to vote for public officials. Everyone lived in constant fear of famine even though most people did work on farms to grow food. And the fastest way to travel was by boat.
This course will accompany the Europeans through uprisings, revolutions and wars as they created today's Europe with its democracy, post-industrial economy, and consumer society. We'll pay attention to the lives of ordinary men and women in both western and eastern Europe as well as to the political and cultural achievements of the rich. We'll talk about food protests, political theories, the shift to wage labor in factories, the remodeling of the big cities, women's demands for recognition, the misery of the trenches in WWI, the Nazis' war of racial conquest, and the ideals that inspired Communisim as well as the realities that discredited it.
This course offers a broad survey of modern European history from the Enlightenment to the present through lectures and discussions. Grades will be based on participation in discussion, a map quiz, two essay exams, and a final exam. There are no prerequisites for this course.

Required Texts:
-Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi Assault on Humanity, Scribner, 1995.ISBN 0684826801
-Wiesner, Merry et al. Discovering the Western Past: A Look at the Evidence. 4th ed., Houghton-Mifflin, 2000. ISBN 0395976146
-Noble, Thomas et al. Western Civilization: The Continuing Experiment. Vol 2, since 1560, BRIEF EDITION Houghton-Mifflin 1999. ISBN 0395885507

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 196. First-Year Seminar.

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor. (3). (SS).

First-Year Seminar,

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 368 / AMCULT 342 / WOMENSTD 360. History of the Family in the U.S.

U.S. History

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Regina Morantz-Sanchez (reginann@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims to help students gain a perspective on the contemporary family by studying the development of this important institution in the American past. Particular emphasis will be placed on changing attitudes toward and experiences of sex roles, sexuality, childrearing, work patterns, and relationships between men, women, and children. We will explore race, ethnicity, and class; cover economic developments as well as shifting conceptions of the role of the state; and ask about the impact of these factors on family life. We will want to examine how much the family has changed over time and try to project, on the basis of historical evidence, whither the family is going.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through History 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 201 Civilians at War: Europe 1939-1947

Instructor(s): Megan Koreman

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

During the Second World War, civilians in Europe endured attacks on two fronts. The first was the military war of bombing and destruction that killed millions of women and children and destroyed the economy. The second was the Nazi occupation with its deliberate policies of terror. The Nazis used the war to re-engineer European society according to their own ideas of racial heirarchy. Whole categories of non-combatants, most notably Jews, were in danger of outright murder or of a slower death by starvation and slave labor.

This course will explore the civilian experience of the war and its aftermath across the continent, from Russian teenagers kidnapped as slave laborers, to German women trapped in bombed-out ruins, to Jewish men treated as beasts in Auschwitz, to French Resistance heroes.
Why did some people risk their lives in the Resistance while others collaborated with the Nazis? How was the Holocaust possible? How did men and women cope with years of food shortages? How did they survive the devastation caused by mass bombing? What happened after the armies stopped fighting? How has the memory of the war shaped the world we live in today? We'll study these and many other questions through memoirs, diaries, novels, monographs and films.

Students should have have some knowlege of modern European history. This is a discussion class. Grades will be based on participaiton, one short paper (5-7 pages), and one long paper (10-12 pages).

Required Text:
-Browning, Christopher. Ordinary Men: Reserve Police Battalion 101 and the Final Solution in Poland, HarperCollins, 1993. ISBN 0060995068
-Burrin, Phillipe. France Under the Germans: Collaboration and Compromise. New Press, 1998. ISBN 1565844394
-Konwicki, Tadeusz. A Minor Apocalypse, Dalkey Archive Press, Illinois State University, 1999. ISBN 1564782174
-Levi, Primo. The Reawakening: The Companion Volume to Survival in Auschwitz, Scribner, 1996. ISBN 0684826356
-Levi, Primo. Survival in Auschwitz: The Nazi Assault on Humanity, Scribner, 1995. ISBN 0684826801
-Mazower, Mark. Inside Hitler's Greece: The Experience of Occupation, Yale Nota Bene, 2001. ISBN 0300089236
-Mulisch, Harry. The Assault, Random House. ISBN 0394744209

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 482. Many Polands: A History of Diversity in Northeastern Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 201 This course is part of a study abroad program with CREES.Courses are in Poland June 30 through July 25.

Instructor(s): Brian A Porter (baporter@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring Half-Term Courses


HISTORY 110 / MEMS 110. Medieval, Renaissance, and Reformation Europe.

European History from Ancient to Modern Times

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What civilization did our European ancestors create? How did they render it so powerful? And why is it so different from its neighbors? This course, with lectures, slides, cinema, and class discussion, addresses these matters topically. You may expect to read and view a number of original sources (biographies, travel accounts, monumental art, and doodles) in order to study the rise and rivalry of Christianity and Islam; changing notions of the hero from swordsman to scientist; comparative treatments of minorities (Jews) and majorities (women); the relationship between church and state; the management of loyalty and love; shipping, printing, and technological superiority; why Columbus reached Japan and Galileo discovered Neptune; the relation between art and autobiography; and other topics that illustrate European history. There will be one hour examination in addition to the final.
Required Texts:
A History of Western Society, vol. 1: From Antiquity to the the Enlightenment, by John P. McKay, Bennett Hill and John Buckler. ISBN 0-395-90432
Beowulf and Other Old English Poems, by Constance B Hieatt. ISBN 0-553-21347-4
The Song of Roland, by Glyn Burgess. ISBN 0-14-044532-3
Chronicle of the Abbey of Bury St. Edmunds, by Diana Greenway. ISBN 0-19-283895-4
Chronicles of the Crusades, by Margaret R.B. Shaw. ISBN 0-14-044124-7
The Life of Cola Di Rienzo, by Alberto Maria Ghisalberti. ISBN 0-88-844-267X

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 161. United States, 1865 to the Present.

U.S. History

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Heather A Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an undergraduate survey of American history from 1865 to the present. It examines the major social, political, and economic events that shaped America after the Civil War (Reconstruction, Industrialization, Progressivism, the New Deal, WWI and II, McCarthyism, Feminism, the Civil Rights Movement, Vietnam, Great Society Liberalism, etc. ) This survey acquaints students with the urban, labor, African-American, and women's history of this period through both primary and secondary sources as well as film.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTORY 394. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through History 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Individual reading program under the direction of a staff member.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 101 History, Art & Cinema of Travel.

Instructor(s): Rudi P Lindner (rpl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This seminar considers the history of discovery, exploration, and travel. We will read the accounts of men and women, mostly in the modern era, covering a large part of the world, and we will also look at the ways they depicted their travels in art, photography, and the movies. We will look at selected parts of the globe, including the poles, mountaineering, and the exploration of space as reflected in science fiction. Students will write responses to some of the readings and movies, and the choice of a final project (on an explorer, or an area, or a genre such as movies) will be up to the student.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

HISTORY 397. History Colloquium.

Section 102 Radicalism & Protest Postwar US.

Instructor(s): Heather A Thompson

Prerequisites & Distribution: History concentrators are required to elect Hist. 396 or 397. (3). (HU). May be repeated for a total of twelve credits.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the history of radicalism in the United States, and to various protest movements of radicals, particularly after WW II. Students will be asked to analyze the roots, strengths, weaknesses, and connections between these movements through reading primary and secondary sources, taking readings quizzes, watching documentary video, and writing short papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

Spring/Summer Term Courses


HISTORY 395. Reading Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open only to history concentrators by written permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit only with permission of the Associate Chairman. A maximum of six credits can be elected through History 394 and 395.

Credits: (1-4; 1-3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This is an independent 1-4 credit course open only to history concentrators by written permission of the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTORY 399. Honors Colloquium, Senior.

Section 001.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Honors student, Hist. 398, and senior standing. (1-6). (Excl). May be repeated for a total of six credits.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is a workshop for thesis writers. It concentrates on practical and theoretical problems of research and writing with special reference to methodological questions.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for HISTORY.


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