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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art

This page was created at 7:33 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 201 Theatre/Visual Art in Europe. Meets with AC 301.203

Instructor(s): Tatiana V Senkevitch

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The theatre and the visual arts often crossed paths in the history of 17th and 18th-century European culture. The theatre and the visual arts shared themes and patrons; they turned to the same classical sources in art and literature in their search for inspiration; they borrowed the forms of expression and language of representation from each other. Nonetheless, they remained autonomous forms of art, whose co-existance and cross-fertilization illuminates the character of the European culture of the period. The theatre, combining music, dramatic action, ballet, and decoration relied in many ways on artists working in the "silent" forms of art. Architects, sculptures, and painters were engaged in creating the stage sets, designing costumes, and developing the mise-en-scènes for the performances. The engravers, among other artists, were particularly responsible for recording the most significant moments of the performances, advertising the events, and spreading information about then throughout Europe.

This course examines the robust partnership between the theatre and the visual arts. It introduces students to the works of art that are related to specific theatrical traditions and events, or which have been generated in the same cultural milieu, court, or urban culture. Students will use the forms and methods of visual analysis to further their understanding of Baroque culture in general and the visual arts of the period particular. Course coverage will begin with early 17th century Ducal Florence and an examination of court festivals and their printed and graphic record and end in the late 18th century with the analysis of the fête revolutionnaire, a new form of public spectacle emerging with the French revolution of 1789. The dialogue between theatre art and the visual arts and the multiplicity of forms this dialogue assumed will be considered through an examination of the specific forms of the theatre ranging from the popular commedia dell'arte to the courtly fête galante. The course will discuss the interchange between the theatrical and visual arts in France, England, and Italy. The Synthetic forms of the Baroque theatre will be analyzed, along with the works of Tiepolo, Jacques Callot, Stefano della Bella, Inigo Jones, Lorenzo Bernini, Jean Batiste Greuze, Antoine Watteau, and others.The course aims at bringing together students form different disciplines, ranging form art history to music, dance, film studies, architecture and others. The course will combine lectures, weekly discussions of readings, viewing of selected films, and guest lectures.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 202 Making of Rome - An Urban Process.

Instructor(s): Catherine C Mccurrach

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Rome. The Eternal City. The conceptual capital of the western Empire and the physical capital of Christiandom, Rome has captured the imagination of pilgrims, artists, and dictators alike. While the poles that define the city for many today are those of Ancient Rome's Colosseum and Renaissance Rome's St. Peter's, it was Medieval Rome that determined the very shape of the city. Its organizational structures are due to the monuments and systems created in the 1000-year period between 314 and 1300. This course will examine the monuments of the Middle Ages, considering the manner in which they employed the past as they looked to the future. It will focus on the many factors that shape the urban process. While the immediate goal will be to present Medieval Rome, the larger goal will be to provide the conceptual framework with which one can consider issues of creation of urban space.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


History of Art 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from History of Art 101 to History of Art 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 101 Netherlands Comedy and Humor.

Instructor(s): Noel G Schiller

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Puking peasants, erotic Ovidian myths, amorous shepherds, and bawdy households are but a few of the categories of humorous images that figure in the visual culture of the Netherlands during the 16th and 17th centuries. This seminar explores the complex and fascinating relationships between art and humor, text and image in the context of an investigation of the modalities of the comic. By exploring paintings and engravings as visual texts in 17th-century Netherlands in light of contemporary criticism, this course hopes to provide insight into the cultural specificity of joking and laughter and to complicate our understanding of humor. One of the primary aims of the course will be to help students hone their ability to analyze and write about what they see.

Each unit will focus attention on a genre of comic literature and images of a particular artist or artists that seem to operate as visual manifestations of contemporary Netherlandish culture. Our attention will first focus on the peasant imagery and illustrated proverbs of Pieter Bruegel that make oral traditions visual. Other topics will include: emblem books (containing illustrated moralizing riddles), a popular form of entertainment and edification, the courtly art of Hendrick Goltzius and the vogue for witty satirical illustrations of the erotic myths of Ovid, pastoral plays and portraits 'in guise' as parody, and the farcical (self-) representations of Jan Steen. In addition to primary sources, the readings each week will include art historical literature that will help us to develop a vocabulary with which to understand the visual culture of the period.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 102 Picasso, Cubism, Avant-Garde.

Instructor(s): Christopher P Leichtnam

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course we will examine a single, but truly intense episode in modern art: the emergence and development of cubism in Paris between the years c.1907-1915. This was a crucial, even poignant, moment in the history of post-Renaissance art, one that made an extraordinary attempt to overhaul that tradition's pictorial and sculptural conventions under the (often intolerable) conditions of modernity. Our objective will be two-fold: to develop interdisciplinary strategies for describing and interpreting images relative to their context of production, as well as to assess the critical texts that seek to understand them. Though the course will deal primarily with the major problems posed by the works of Picasso and Braque - for example, the implications of so-called "primitivism"; the interrogation of the ways in which form produces meaning; problems of readability; the question of the avant-garde and political engagement; and so on - we shall also consider the roles of Seurat, Cézanne, Matisse, Gris, Léger, Metzinger, Duchamp and Mondrian, as well as related interventions in literature and film. Concentrating on cubism, then, can offer a means of access to a wide range of modernist tactics specific to the late nineteenth- and early twentieth centuries. As such, it will also provide us with a chance to think about the assumptions on which those various strategies were based in relation to their historical circumstances.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring/Summer Term Courses


HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected for credit more than once.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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This page was created at 7:33 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.

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