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Spring/Summer 2002 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer 2002) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Sociology

This page was created at 7:39 AM on Mon, Jul 1, 2002.


Summer Half-Term Courses


SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 201 – Social Inequality and Civic Engagement.

Instructor(s): Cynthia Miller (CYNTHIAL@umich.edu) , Inna Altschul (inna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 300. Seniors must elect Soc. 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 195 or 300 (or 400). No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Democracies are imperfect systems that are filled with tensions and contradictions. They challenge us to examine and participate in our own governance. The sociological perspective helps us to meet this challenge by giving us the tools to understand our own society. This course will introduce you to the basic sociological principles of inequality and civic engagement. The first part of this course will include a unit on race and a unit on gender and sexuality. In each unit, we first discuss prejudice and discrimination at the level of individual interaction. This will be followed in each of the units by a discussion of the ways in which inequalities, discrimination and oppression are created and reproduced institutionally. In the second part of the course, we turn to the question of what it means to be a citizen in a liberal democracy and to participate politically. We will talk about the various kinds of political engagement, comparing conventional and unconventional forms of civic activism (including voluntarism, legal intervention, and social protest). We will discuss the conditions under which different forms of activism have been utilized historically and why. We will be integrating current events and national policy debates with theoretical readings on these topics. Because the course covers a broad range of issues, you will be expected to choose one area to examine in greater depth for a midterm paper and a final paper.

This course will enable you to: identify and understand conflict based on social identities, discrimination and oppression; identify and understand the impact of your biases and the biases of others; engage in critical thinking, analysis and creative problem-solving of social issues; evaluate social problems and articulate an informed personal opinion; and determine ways in which you can contribute to solving social problems and engage in the political process.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 101. Person and Society: An Introduction to Sociology Through Social Psychology.

Introductory courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged and seniors must take Soc. 300 or 401. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An introductory study of the interrelationships of the functioning of social systems and the behavior and attitudes of individuals. Lecture and discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Troy Smith (smithtd@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or AAS; AAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E).

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Using the sociological perspective, this course will engage in a critical examination of the meaning of race and ethnicity in contemporary American society. This sociological approach also incorporates a macro-historical framework in applying theoretical concepts to understand how social patterns of racial and ethnic relations have changed or remained the same over time. Integrating classical and contemporary sociological theories, we will examine how the concepts of race and ethnicity has been constructed over time, and crow they have been linked to social institutions, and social policy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Rebecca Utz (utzrl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with Soc. 397. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the method and practice of social research. It will expose students to both the practice and the theory of social research. The primary objectives are: (a) to focus on the logic or reasoning behind different methods; (b) to familiarize students with a variety of research approaches used to accumulate evidence in the social sciences; and (c) to give students an opportunity to present and critique sociological research in a mini student conference held at the end of the term. We will consider both quantitative and qualitative research methods, including ethnography, observation, interview, and survey research. Learning will be accomplished through critical reading of exemplary works by sociologists and by conducting mini research simulations. The goals of the course are to make students more critical consumers of published research results, and to gain hands on experience with a variety of research techniques. There are two lecture/discussion periods a week, as well as a weekly practicum session devoted to hands on research simulations. Grading is based on active engagement with the course material, two exams (midterm and final), as well as a series of short papers in which students critique existing research or write up the results of their own mini research projects. The course will culminate in a student conference on the last day of the term.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Spring Half-Term Courses


SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Elaine Weiner (weinere@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in Soc. 300. Seniors must elect Soc. 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 195 or 300 (or 400). No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

By definition, sociology involves the systematic study of human social behavior, interaction and organization. Sociologists are particularly interested in understanding how human social life is shaped by social forces (e.g. globalization) and social structures (e.g. class). This is a survey course designed to introduce you to the field of sociology. In this class, we will explore various sociological concepts, methodologies and theoretical perspectives. We will also examine sociological approaches to the study of deviance, culture, socialization, social inequalities (e.g. race, gender), social institutions (e.g. family, media) globalization, and social change.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 101 – Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Intended primarily for first- and second-year students. May not be used as a prerequisite for a concentration in psychology. (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration plan. May be repeated for a total of four credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 122.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 101 – American Working Class Life. (3 credits).

Instructor(s): Rachel Meyer (remeyer@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Introductory course). Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through Soc. 102, 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The wealth produced in the economic boom of the 1990s, while supposedly benefiting American society in general, was actually beneficial for those already at the higher end of the class structure. Missing in news reports and popular discourse was an understanding of the effects that this boom and the so called new economy continued loss of industrial jobs and decreases in union membership, downsizing and layoffs, increase in part time and temporary employment had on the working class. The fate of the American working class has been as absent in recent scholarly discourse (for example, the turn to study of new social movements instead of labor movements) as it has been in the pages of the New York Tiers. While the concept of class has been critical in the history of sociological thought (from both Marx and Weber through the new social history of the 1960s) it has dropped out of focus in the last few decades as part of the postmodern and cultural turn. This course seeks to address the lack of public and scholarly attention paid to American working class life.

The course will be organized around the following two basic themes: First, is the working class a cohesive social group? If so, what makes the working class a cohesive social group? Second, what is the variety and diversity of American working class experience? Throughout the course particular attention will be paid to race, gender and working class resistance. The course will begin with readings on socialization and the creation of the working class self which will lead to a discussion of power and control in the workplace and the dynamics of conflict and consent. The experience of workers in both industrial and service sector settings will be explored with regard to de-skilling and routinization. The section on gender will pay as much attention to working class masculinity as women's working class experience. Similarly, with regards to race the discussion will begin with the construction of working class whiteness and will be followed by a focus on African-American working class experience and resistance. The last sections of the course will explore unions and labor movement mobilization and, finally, globalization and the relationship between first and third world workers. Readings will be primarily ethnographic accounts (along with some oral history) in order to highlight working class perspectives and experience.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Susannah Dolance (sdolance@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Stats. 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 402, 405, or 412, or Econ. 404 or 405. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1).

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended to introduce you to three aspects of statistics: 1) data collection-including opinion polls, surveys, experiments, and sampling: 2) data description- procedures for summarizing quantitative data: 3) data analysis- using data to make decisions, predictions, and draw inferences. You are not assumed to have prior experience with computers or mathematical training beyond basic algebra. You will become familiar with SPSS through the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Daniel Goh (dgoh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Soc. 405. (4). (Excl).

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The course introduces the sociology student to the currents of social theory that inform and invigorate sociological thought and research. The structure of the course frames social theory as a dialogue between thinkers concerned with both the puzzle and the problem of modern society. The course is a historical narrative in two parts. Part I critically examines the "classical" social theories of Karl Marx, Max Weber and Emile Durkheim. It begins by locating Marx as activist, humanist philosopher and social scientist, acknowledging therefore his triple legacy to contemporary social thought, and ends by questioning the construction of canonical theory texts and what it entails for knowledge. Part II explores "contemporary" social theories as the continuation of debates with the "classical" theorists. We will read texts that established the theoretical bases of modern American sociology, critical responses to academic theorizing, and new theoretical directions inspired by our changing world.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 101 – Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Soc. 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of 8 credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Psychology 311.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 3, Permission of Instructor

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Sheila Marie Bluhm (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (3). (SS).

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology 344 will provide a sociological examination of marriage and family life. The course will consider the meaning of marriage and family life and the ways that these social institutions are embedded within the larger social system. Of particular importance are the ways in which marriage and family systems intersect with, define, and are defined by the social and economic structures of society. The course will study various dimensions of marriage and family patterns, including structures, processes, relationships, and changes. The course will examine the ways in which family structures and relationships are influenced by social, economic, and personal forces and how family structures and processes, in turn, influence personal and social life. Several main aspects of marriage and family life will be investigated: kin relationships and household structure; division of labor and authority; courtship and mate selection; union formation and dissolution; and childbearing. Both historical and comparative perspectives on these marriage and family issues will be considered. A text book is typically required. Grading is based on a combination of exams and essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 101 – CONTACT PROJECT COMMUNITY FOR FURTHER INFO: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/projectcommunity

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/projectcommunity/

Sociology 389, is also known as "Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem-solving. Students enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project. NOTE: All sections of Sociology 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available in the Fall and Winter terms. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations that provide mental health counseling and drug-abuse treatment. Limited opportunities are available in the Spring term.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 119.

Instructor(s): David Schoem (dschoem@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology 389 is known as Project Community. For Spring term, students will combine 12 hours of internship service in a community setting with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning and problem-solving. Student enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to compile reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project. Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

Section 119 - HARC (HIV & Aids Resource Center) This internship experience will provide students with an opportunity to gain valuable experience and insight into non-profit organizations in health care (HARC - HIV/Aids Resource Center) and community development (Focus Hope). Students will reflect on their service experience as they learn about the complex social issues facing their non-profit organizations. As a condensed course in spring term, the service learning experience will be more extended and intensive each week and will provide a deeper, more intensive internship-type educational experience for students.

The internship component for HARC will be late afternoons and early evenings on MW (3-7:30pm) and occasional Tuesdays (3-5pm). There will be one all-day volunteer orientation session and a 2-day weekend training session in early May. Students will participate in the community outreach/education work of HARC in the Ann Arbor/Ypsilanti area.

Section 120 - Focus Hope The internship component for Focus Hope will take place on Mondays and on Wednesday or Thursday. Students will have an opportunity to work in the finance department and food distribution areas at Focus Hope in Detroit.

Enrollment priority is given to students in the Michigan Community Scholars Program. Other students may contact the MCSP office for enrollment consideration (Telephone: 734-647-4860).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 120.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Section 121.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 423 / AMCULT 421. Social Stratification.

Section 101 – Social space, power, and inequality

Instructor(s): Frederique Laubepin (flaubepi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociologists use the term stratification to refer to the system of ranking individuals in terms of their access to, and possession of, the things that are valued by their society. This ranking is usually characterized by differences of power among groups of people, resulting in conflict and inequalities of gender, race, class nation and sexuality (to name a few). Sociology is concerned with the principles underlying the creation, reproduction and subversion of these inequalities. Until recently, sociology regarded social space primarily as a stage where social relations and practices were performed. However the growing influence of social geography is now making social researchers rethink space as a significant dimension of social processes, including stratification. This course is designed to help students think of space as a significant dimension of social life, and understand the intersections of spatiality, power and social inequalities. We will first introduce the notion that the social and the spatial are inextricably realized one in the other because spaces and places are socially constructed: they are a product of history and culture (and as such are invested with meaning and value); they contribute fundamentally to the formation of personal and social identities; and they embody and reproduce ideology and power relationships. In other words, they can and do function as a way of structuring social life, both physically and symbolically. We will then explore the ways in which social spaces as sites of social interaction and the exercise of power reflect, constitute and reproduce social inequalities, including inequalities of gender, race, social class, sexuality and nation. Finally we will endeavor to assess the possibilities for political and oppositional movements that challenge social inequalities in various spatial locations. Students will gain from this course an understanding of the role that space plays in creating and perpetuating social stratification, as well as the ways in which it can be used to question power and hegemony. While the course will focus on the contemporary United States, we will engage comparative and historical perspectives, and examine a select group of theoretical approaches and case studies from several disciplines, including sociology, anthropology, geography, architecture, and urban planning. Readings range from fairly straightforward reports of social research findings to quite complex and idiosyncratic passages of social theory.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Burcak Keskin (bkeskin@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl).

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course aims at providing (1) an introduction to major sociological theories of gender, and, (2) application of the theoretical debates to four sociological fields of inquirynamely, social stratification, state, family and marriage, and body image. We will explore the power relations underlying the categories of woman/hood and man/hood and also problematize these categories with respect to class, racial, sexual and international differences. Weekly movie screenings will help elaborate the issues in specific cases. The grade will be based on a midterm (30%), a term paper (35%), two short commentary papers (20%), attendance and participation (15%).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

Spring/Summer Term Courses


SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 2205 MICHIGAN TO OBTAIN OVERRIDE.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of Soc. 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be repeated four times, for a total of eight credits.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course_PC.html PRIOR to registering for a Soc 389 Project Community section. Questions and overrides must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

Sociology 389 is known as Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem–solving.

Students enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project.

NOTE: All sections of Sociology 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

WL:2. If a particular section is full, please e–mail Mark Chesler(seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of Soc. 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected for credit in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


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