Information for Prospective Students Information for First-Year Students Information for Transfer Students Information for International Students Learning Communities, Study Abroad, Theme Semester Calendars Quick Reference Forms Listings Table of Contents SAA Search Feature Academic Advising, Concentration Advising, How-tos, and Degree Requirements Academic Standards Board, Academic Discipline, Petitions, and Appeals SAA Advisors and Support Staff


Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in CAAS

This page was created at 8:05 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)



CAAS 203. Issues in Afro-American Development.

African-American Studies

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (SS). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 206. Issues in African Studies.

African Studies

Section 101 — Exploring the Local, Diasporic, and International Dimension of the Colonial Experience in Africa.

Instructor(s): Moses Ochonu

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (Excl). (African Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to the origins, course, intricacies, and legacies of European colonial rule in sub-Saharan Africa. It will examine colonialism as a collection of numerous episodes, events, and issues that brought and kept African peoples within the political and economic control of European powers, which in turn made their plight part of a diasporic and internationalist struggle for economic, racial, and political justice.

Firstly, the course looks at the many complex ways that Africa first encountered Europeans — focusing on trade and cultural exchanges — and how these interactions crystallized in formal colonial rule.

Secondly, we will examine the scramble for African territories among European powers, the forces that shaped the scramble, and Africans' responses to the assault on their sovereignty.

Thirdly we will study colonialism's diverse manifestations in different parts of the continent, paying attention to how different European powers envisioned their colonies and how they actually ruled them.

Fourthly, we will examine the activities of different European powers in their colonies, how these activities were sustained for decades, their impacts on African peoples, on their vocations and on their cultures.

Lastly, the course will examine the patterns of European decolonization, the timing of such decolonization, the types and role, if any, of nationalist movements in 'winning' back flag independence. This section of the course also will scrutinize the many arguments about why and how European rule in Africa ended.

The method of this class will be a combination of lecture and discussion. Brief — mostly informal — lectures will be given at the beginning of class to survey and contextualize topics and to clarify course materials. Lectures will not be a substitute for critical reasoning, debate, and probing that will not only be encouraged but will form the bulk of class activity. In fact, my aim is to get you to assess the secondary readings as particular views and analyses about the past, and the primary readings as consciously and sometimes strategically crafted documents about past events, issues, and personalities. Neither group of readings is a statement of fact to be simply read, memorized, and regurgitated.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 101 — Black Nationalism and Pan-Africanism: The Intellectual Politics of Transnational Negotiations of Colonial Situations.

Instructor(s): Tracy Flemming (tkfl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The focus of this interdisciplinary course will consider "Black" (in the broadest, non-national sense) nationalist intellectual production and the effects of the responses of racialism and domination, as well as explore the very core, or logic, of hegemonic discourses on race, class, gender and sexuality, which have been central to Black imaginings of identification, representation, nation and/or self-determination. We will conclude with a discussion of twentieth-century nationalism(s), particularly its (dis)continuities with earlier traditions.

This course is designed to assist you in acquiring an enhanced knowledge of complexities of early Black nationalism and Pan-Africanism. Particularly, this course is meant to serve as both a lecture and as a forum where you can exchange ideas regarding relevant topics of discussion.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 211. Dynamics of the Black Diaspora.

Section 102.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 111. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 303 / SOC 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

African-American Studies

Section 101.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/303/101.nsf

See Sociology 303.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 327 / PSYCH 315. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

African-American Studies

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 327 / PSYCH 315. Psychological Aspects of the Black Experience.

African-American Studies

Section 101 — The Development of Social Psychological Research in Africa.

Instructor(s): Denis C Ugwuegbu

Prerequisites & Distribution: One course in psychology or Afroamerican and African Studies. CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The primary objective of this course is to equip students, through lectures, group discussions, and discovery, with the necessary theoretical and practical knowledge, skills, and techniques that will enable them to carry out social psychological research in the African environment. The course is aimed at the upper-level (300 & 400) undergraduate students in Psychology, African-American and African Studies, and other related social science disciplines. The principles underlying the collection of scientific research data remain the same but the cultural influences under which scientific research data are assembled must be taken into consideration if a researcher is to collect valid, reliable, and generalizable research information. The discussion in the course begins with examination of the status of systematic psychology and social psychological research in Africa, factors that impede the development of psychology and social psychological research in the African setting, and the responsibilities of a social psychological researcher to the African subjects. We will also discuss the traditional African approaches to the generation of knowledge. The student will further learn how to plan psychological and social research in Africa, the use of sampling techniques in African setting, how to recruit and train field workers, interviewers, and how to obtain data that are reliable, valid, and have external validity from a non-Western population such as Africa. Finally, the course will assess the contributions of social psychological research to social change in Africa. A course pack will be purchased for the course. Reading references will also be on reserve in the Library. Student performance in the course will be based on two examinations, field research, attendance, and class participation. There are no prerequisites for taking the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 333. Perspectives in Afro-American History.

African-American Studies

Section 101 — Affirmative Action in American Law, Culture, and Politics.

Instructor(s): Ronald C Woods (rcwoods@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/caas/333/101.nsf

In looking at the law and policy components of the contemporary debate, we will examine the legal foundations of the issue beginning with its Reconstruction origins and continuing on through the court challenges that define the issue today. In looking at the subject in its broad cultural and historical significance, we will examine affirmative action as the most recent phase of a long running debate in America over power, position, and access. The ultimate goal is to see the issue as a reflection of the on-going struggle — played out in legal, historical and sociocultural arenas — over inclusion and exclusion in American society.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 338 / ENGLISH 320. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

African-American Studies

Section 101 — African American Literature on Racial Passing.

Instructor(s): Nicole Stanton (stantonn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU). (African-American Studies). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the ways in which Americans — Black and white — have explored issues of "race," culture, and authenticity by writing novels about racial passing. Questions this course considers include: How can we explain the popularity of the "tragic mulatto" figure? How do passing novels reflect the fears (of Blacks and whites) about racial difference and racial purity? Do passing novels challenge notions of "authentic Blackness"? What are the sexual politics of passing? How have ideas about passing changed over time? Has passing finally "passed" out of style?

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 340 / AMCULT 340. A History of Blacks in American Film.

African-American Studies

Section 101 — THE AFRICAN AMERICAN CINEMATIC EXPERIENCE.

Instructor(s): Melba J Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (Excl). (African-American Studies). Laboratory fee ($15) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($15) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on the developing and burgeoning film industry emerging from the African American experience and/or its cultural context. It considers the historical circumstances that have impeded a reasonable representation of Black Americans in American cinema, while investigating the forms and styles expressed in independent and commercial productions. This includes an historical overview, but focuses on more recent works since the Civil Rights Movement of the '60s and '70s. Both documentary and feature films are examined and considered in terms of their cinematic techniques and aesthetic characteristics as well as for their social and political themes. The course will consider major Black directors and will attempt to view at least one of their works, and preview others. There will also be a comparative analysis of the feature and the documentary on Malcolm X. The examination and discussion of the films will require the use of cinematic vocabulary.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 101 — Topic?

Instructor(s): James Chaffers

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1 and Permission of Department

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 102 — Public, Performance & Conceptual Art. Meets with Art 346.

Instructor(s): Keith Alexander

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course examines the common aesthetic, political and environmental origins of Public, Performance and Conceptual art, with a focus on the Afro-American, African and Afro-Caribbean influences and practitioners of these art forms over the past 100 years as a source of inspiration and guidance in your own work as an artist in these genres. Artists we will study include: Faith Ringgold, Alan Kaprow, Juliet Ezenwa Nze, Albert Chong, Sue Williamson, Johnny Coleman, Sophie Calle, Tyree Guyton, Guillermo Gomez-Pena, Jean-Michel Basquiat, Lorna Simpson, Yoko Ono, Hans Haacke, Keith Haring, and Chris Burden. A daily journal that records your thoughts and ideas is required, as is reading aloud from it in class. Your grade will be determined by: the success, ingenuity, and originality of your artwork; the success of your journal; and your classroom participation and effort.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 358. Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 103 — America's Civil Rights Movement, 1954-1968.

Instructor(s): Gonzalez

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (CAAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

CAAS 490. Special Topics in Black World Studies.

Cross-Area Courses

Section 101 — Introduction to Afro-Caribbean and African-American Dance Forms. [1 Credit]. Meets with Dance 141.101.

Instructor(s): Robin M Wilson

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing. (1-2). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Mini/short course

Credits: (1-2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)



Summer Half-Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)



CAAS 410. Supervised Reading and Research.

Cross-Area Courses

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (Cross-Area Courses). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the concentration advisor. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term (CAAS 410 or 510), the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For students who can show appropriate preparation in courses previously taken, the Center for Afroamerican and African Studies offers course credit for independent study. A full-time faculty member must agree to supervise the undertaking and to meet with the student during the term. The proposed course of study may not duplicate the material of any course regularly offered by the Center. The reading and writing requirement should be comparable to that required in a regular course for the same number of credits; and all the work must be completed by the final day of class in the term. After consultation with and approval from a CAAS faculty member, applications for independent study along with statements describing the schedule of readings and of writing assignments must be filled out. Such applications must be signed by the faculty member involved and turned in before the end of the second week of the term. It is therefore advisable to submit applications (available in 200 West Hall) in advance of the beginning of the independent study term and, upon approval, a permission number will be issued.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for CAAS.


Page


This page was created at 8:05 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

LSA

University of Michigan | College of LS&A | Student Academic Affairs | LS&A Bulletin Index | Department Homepage

This page maintained by LS&A Advising Technology (webmaster_saa@umich.edu), 1228 Angell Hall

Copyright © 2003 The Regents of the University of Michigan,
Ann Arbor, MI 48109 USA +1 734 764-1817

Trademarks of the University of Michigan may not be electronically or otherwise altered or separated from this document or used for any non-University purpose.