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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies

This page was created at 8:07 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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AAPTIS 291. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 101 — Postcolonial Islam. Postcolonial Islam: Muslim Politics, Fundamentalism and Globalization. Introduction to NES Linquistics.

Instructor(s): Gerdines Johannes van Schaaik

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 291. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 102 — Postcolonial Islam: Muslim Politics, Fundamentalism and Globalization. Orthodoxy and Heresy: Boundaries of Theological Tolerance in Islam.

Instructor(s): W Wesley Williams Jr (wwwillia@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will explore a wide range of topics relevant to an understanding of the development of theology in Islam, particularly the negotiation of orthodoxy and the assessment of heresy. We shall attempt to:

  1. locate the outer limits of 'right belief' in Islam;
  2. define the criteria by which these limits were set and reset; and
  3. determine the extent to which normative Islam in the Pre-modern and modern periods was/is able or willing to acccommodate multiple and varied interperative traditions.

We shall discuss topics ranging from the Inquisition initiated by the Abbasid calif Al-Ma'mun (d.833) to Elijah Muhammad (d.1975) and the Black Muslim Movement of the United States. Evaluation will be based on class participation and a final term paper.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of AAPTIS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Spring/Summer Term Courses

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AAPTIS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of AAPTIS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

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AAPTIS 101. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, I.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 102.201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($12) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($12) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/summer/aaptis/101/201.nsf

Students must register for both courses in the AAPTIS 101-102 sequence, which provides an accelerated introduction to the phonology and script of Modern Standard Arabic and its basic vocabulary and fundamental structures. Emphasis is placed on developing speaking, reading and writing skills through simple short texts, situational dialogues, and interactive communicative activities. This sequence is equivalent to one year of Arabic study. Textbooks: Rammuny, Arabic Sounds and Letters and Manual, Brustad et al., Al-Kitab, Part One.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 102. Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 101.201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 101. (5). (LR). Laboratory fee ($10) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($10) required.

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/summer/aaptis/102/201.nsf

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 101.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 291. Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish and Islamic Studies.

Occasional Course

Section 201 — Postcolonial Islam: Muslim Politics, Fundamentalism and Globalization.

Instructor(s): Najeeb Ahmed Jan (janna@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Islam has literally been "thrown" into every American household, and with it a host of confusing symbols, imageries, and conflicting interpretations. Bush has told us that this "New War" is not about Islam. Rushdie claims that it is! This course shall attempt to equip students with a variety of intellectual tools with which they may begin to think critically and reflexively about a complex set of issues around the "question of Islam." I do this by raising a broad range of problematics relating to contemporary political Islam, while throwing into question the validity or adequateness of the primary analytic categories (Islam, fundamentalism, modernity, etc.) used to explain and understand the present crisis. What for instance is political Islam, or rather what is the relationship of the political to the religious? Islamic fundamentalism had already come to dominate the American imaginary of the enemy, but in the wake of 911 is this view justified? How has the media effected this representation of the Muslim world? Are we indeed heading for a clash of civilizations?

In part, this course will attempt to demystify Muslim/Islamic fundamentalism and challenge the notion that Muslim politics is a unified, homogenous phenomenon. While moving away from the sensationalist and essentialist depictions of a global monolithic and militant Islam on the move, an image created in large part as a result of simplistic often context-free and ahistorical media representations, we also ask if it is indeed desirable to dismiss groups like the Taliban as mere extremist deviants. In other words, in the absence of the Prophet, who speaks for "true" Islam? Because "Islam" still remains the site of intense and often violent contestations which continue to forge the parameters of state legitimacy and a variety of nationalist and pan-Islamic imaginations, a situated and historical study of Islamist forces becomes vital in our understanding of the nature and direction of sociopolitical transformations in the modern world. Hence we also will discuss the ways in which it becomes necessary to talk of a variety of Islams, if we are to fully appreciate the political dynamics of a diverse Muslim world, a world, as 911, so clearly demonstrates, whose boundaries are by no means confined to 'the East.' Course requirements: Active participation and a two page response to every week's readings, discussions, and films. A final paper and exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 395. Directed Undergraduate Readings.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

AAPTIS 409. Business Arabic, I.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 410.201.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 204. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This sequence is offered for students and other members of the community who have completed two or more terms of Arabic and wish to continue Arabic study for career and professional purposes. The first part of the course focuses on topics related to the basic communication needs of travelers and business people and general information of Arab countries. The second part includes topics such as business customs and practice, commercial advertisements, business correspondence, business contracts and agreements, commercial and economic reports, etc. Students who successfully complete this course will be able to perform well in a variety of situations, both social and business. Textbooks: R. Rammuny, Business Arabic I & II.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 410. Business Arabic, II.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 409.201.

Instructor(s): Raji M Rammuny (raram@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 409. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 409.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 417. Colloquial Levantine Arabic, I.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 418.201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 102. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/summer/aaptis/417/201.nsf

Students who register for this course must also enroll in AAPTIS 418. This sequence provides extensive oral and communicative practice based on situational dialogues as used by native speakers in Jerusalem, Amman, Damascus and Beirut. The goal is to develop the ability to communicate with native speakers of Levantine Arabic with some ease. At least one year of Arabic studies is required. Successful completion of AAPTIS 417 and 418 will fulfill the foreign language requirement for students who have already completed the Arabic 101/102 sequence.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 418. Colloquial Levantine Arabic, II.

Arabic: Language Courses

Section 201 — Students must also register for AAPTIS 417.201.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: AAPTIS 417. (3). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/summer/aaptis/418/201.nsf

See Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies 417.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 480 / ARMENIAN 483. Intensive Introductory Classical Armenian.

Armenian: Language Courses

Section 201 — TAUGHT AT YEREVAN STATE UNIVERSITY IN ARMENIA. FOR MORE INFORMATION, CONTACT DEPT.

Instructor(s): Kevork B Bardakjian (kbar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 479. (6). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (6 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Armenian Studies 480.201.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

AAPTIS 498. Senior Honors Thesis.

Occasional Course

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-6). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be elected more than once for credit. Continuing Course. Y grade can be reported at end of the first-term to indicate work in progress. At the end of the second term of AAPTIS 498, the final grade is posted for both term's elections.

Credits: (1-6).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for AAPTIS.


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This page was created at 8:07 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

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