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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Anthropological Archaeology

This page was created at 8:05 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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ANTHRARC 296(ANTHRCUL 296). Topics in Archaeology.

Section 101 — Are My Parents Neandertals? An Archaeological Approach to Modern Human Origins

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (SS). May be elected for a maximum of 12 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The purpose of this course is to introduce students to the complex and fascinating problem of the emergence of modern humans. Many believe that anatomically modern humans arose in Africa some 100,000 years ago and slowly spread to other continents, replacing the Neandertals and archaic populations of Asia and Australia. However, there is much discussion about what "being modern" means. Does it refer to anatomy, genes, behavior or a combination of all three? This course uses a multidisciplinary approach to address this question. New data and theories from three different fields — archaeology, biological anthropology, and human genetics — are considered with this issue in mind. The course will review evidence for both anatomical and behavioral changes in Africa, Europe, Asia, and Australia. Some questions will be of particular interest. How do Neandertals differ from us? How did they differ from early modern humans? Were early modern humans the first "us" of the past? How did these populations live? What did they eat? Did they symbolize their world? The study of regional and temporal differences will allow us to get a clearer picture of who we are and how we came to be.

This course deals with a broad range of topics, but focuses more specifically on archaeology, human genetics, and physical anthropology. Because this course attempts to provide an introductory overview of the problem of modern human origins, no specific background is needed for this course, although some knowledge of archaeology and biology is useful. The course consist of lectures and labs. Students are evaluated through exams (2) and short papers (2) and are expected to read about fve articles or chapters per week (about 70 pages total). Chapters from two books are used:

  • MELLARS, P. 1996, The Neanderthal Legacy, chapter 3.
  • STRINGER, C. B. and C. GAMBLE 1993, In Search of the Neanderthals, New York: chapter 3.

A coursepack will also be available at Accucopy.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ANTHRARC 499(ANTHRCUL 499). Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Spring/Summer Term Courses

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ANTHRARC 499(ANTHRCUL 499). Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)



ANTHRARC 499(ANTHRCUL 499). Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). A maximum of three credits of independent reading may be included in a concentration plan in anthropology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for ANTHRARC.


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This page was created at 8:06 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

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