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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Biology

This page was created at 8:08 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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The Department formerly known as Biology divided into two separate departments, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and MCDB (Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology). The Interdepartmental Program in Biology (BIOLOGY) is administered jointly by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).

Beginning with the Fall 2002 term, there have been some changes in how courses are listed. 100 and 220 - level courses are listed under the subject of BIOLOGY, as are some of the core concentration courses such as Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution. Intermediate and upper level courses are listed under EEB or MCDB, depending on the course topics. Students must look under the three subjects to see whether or not a course is being offered.

Those students planning to register for independent research, 300 or 400, will enroll in either MCDB 300 or 400 or EEB 300 or 400, based on their faculty sponsor's departmental affiliation.

Courses in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Courses in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


BIOLOGY 104 / RCNSCI 104. Introduction to the Natural Sciences.

Section 711 — OFFERED ONLY AT THE BIOLOGICAL STATION, MAY 18- JUNE 14.

Instructor(s): Kristen L Uthus (kuthus@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: First- or second-year standing; written application to the Biological Station. Does not meet prerequisites for any of the biology concentration programs. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course assumes no prior science background and is appropriate for all undergraduates. It will offer a "hands-on" introduction to natural science taught directly in the field. Classes will be held in natural habitats including dunes, forest, streams, bogs, and meadows. Topics include identification of common native plants and animals of the region, glaciation, history of forest development, collection and identification of fossils, observation of carnivorous plants, identification and ecology of birds. Aquatic plants and animals will be studied in Douglas Lake. This course offers an unparalleled opportunity to become acquainted with nature and science and earn five credits toward the Natural Sciences distribution requirement.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, ENROLLMENT BY PERMISSION OF STAFF IN THE BIOL. STATION OFFICE, 745 DENNISON.

BIOLOGY 162. Introductory Biology.

Section 101 — EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN MON. EVENINGS, MAY 12 AND JUNE 2, 6-8 PM.

Instructor(s): Marcus C Ammerlaan (mcammer@umich.edu) , Josephine Kurdziel (josephak@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130. BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology. (5). (NS). (BS). Laboratory fee ($68) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($68) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.biology.lsa.umich.edu/courses/bio162/bio162.html

BIOLOGY 162 is a one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology
  2. genetics
  3. evolution
  4. ecology

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 two-hour lectures, 2 one-and-one-half hour discussions, and 2 three-hour lab sections each week
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WEDNESDAY/THURSDAY OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Time Schedule) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought. For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections. For further information, contact the Introductory Biology office, (764-1430).

Text: Campbell, Reece, Mitchell, Biology 5th Ed.

Lab Manual: available at bookstores

Course pack: at Michigan Union Bookstore only.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: WAITLIST IS IN 1111 NS (764-1430)

BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It also may be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

BIOLOGY 215. Spring Flora of Michigan.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Robyn J Burnham (rburnham@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 or 102. (3). (NS). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($65) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($65) required.

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nolta/Bio310.html

In this field-oriented course students will learn to identify selected families, genera, and species of flowering plants common in Michigan during the spring. Conifers, ferns, and primitive vascular plants may also be covered. Students will learn to use keys for identification, a skill that will be useful anywhere the student goes in the future. Students will be expected to know the diagnostic characteristics of the families learned, interpret structures of the leaves, stems, roots, flowers, fruits, and seeds, and learn some of the characteristics of exposure, soil moisture, and topography that help predict the occurrence of plant species in our area. Classes on Tuesdays and Thursdays will consist of a lecture followed by a lab; on Wednesdays the whole afternoon will be devoted to a field trip to a local natural area. Grades will be based on three lecture exams plus quizzes in the lab and the field.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 225. Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 and a year of chemistry. (3). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals. The physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals is covered as well as limited treatment of human physiology as it relates to general physiological mechanisms. The course relies on the comparative method in analyzing physiological systems of diverse taxa to identify general principles of functional mechanisms. The course also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey.

The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three 2-hour lectures a week, and three 1-hour examinations.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 226. Animal Physiology Laboratory.

Instructor(s): Sushama Denver (spavgi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 (or prior enrollment in BIOLOGY 325, with permission). Students who intend at a later date to take BIOLOGY 225 will not be admitted to BIOLOGY 226 without special permission. (2). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. Laboratory fee ($70) required. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (2).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($70) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for two four-hour sessions a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Spring 2003, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 305. Genetics.

Section 101 — EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN ON MAY 15, MAY 29, AND JUNE 16, 5-8 PM.

Instructor(s): Santhadevi Jeyabalan (sjeyabal@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: gene transmission in eukaryotes and prokaryotes, linkage and recombination, gene expression, mutation and recombination, DNA and chromosomes, molecular genetic analysis, genomics, gene regulation, developmental genetics, and population genetics. There are six hours of lecture each week and two discussion sections of one-and-a-half hours each, directed by Graduate Student Instructors. The discussion sections introduce relevant new material, expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three exams covering lectures, discussions, reading assignments; exams include problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

BIOLOGY 310. Introductory Biochemistry.

Section 101 — EXAMS WILL BE GIVEN ON MAY 16, MAY 30, AND JUNE 13.

Instructor(s): Kathleen V Nolta (nolta@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162 or a 200-level course in Biology taken at UM; and CHEM 210. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 311, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451. (4). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www-personal.umich.edu/~nolta/Bio310.html

Introductory Biochemistry is designed to be a general introduction to the chemistry of biological systems. This course will furnish basic information concerning the organization of chemical reactions in cells and will include information on the enzymes that catalyze these reactions as well as on the interactions between different pathways. Topics covered include: amino acid structure and nomenclature; protein structure and function; enzyme kinetics; nucleic acids; intermediary metabolism; photosynthesis; and regulation of metabolism.

This is a lecture-based course with supplementary discussion sections. A variety of web-based projects will be assigned.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)


The Department formerly known as Biology divided into two separate departments, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and MCDB (Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology). The Interdepartmental Program in Biology (BIOLOGY) is administered jointly by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).

Beginning with the Fall 2002 term, there have been some changes in how courses are listed. 100 and 220 - level courses are listed under the subject of BIOLOGY, as are some of the core concentration courses such as Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution. Intermediate and upper level courses are listed under EEB or MCDB, depending on the course topics. Students must look under the three subjects to see whether or not a course is being offered.

Those students planning to register for independent research, 300 or 400, will enroll in either MCDB 300 or 400 or EEB 300 or 400, based on their faculty sponsor's departmental affiliation.

Courses in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Courses in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)


The Department formerly known as Biology divided into two separate departments, EEB (Ecology and Evolutionary Biology) and MCDB (Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology). The Interdepartmental Program in Biology (BIOLOGY) is administered jointly by the Department of Ecology and Evolutionary Biology (EEB) and the Department of Molecular, Cellular, and Developmental Biology (MCDB).

Beginning with the Fall 2002 term, there have been some changes in how courses are listed. 100 and 220 - level courses are listed under the subject of BIOLOGY, as are some of the core concentration courses such as Genetics, Biochemistry, and Evolution. Intermediate and upper level courses are listed under EEB or MCDB, depending on the course topics. Students must look under the three subjects to see whether or not a course is being offered.

Those students planning to register for independent research, 300 or 400, will enroll in either MCDB 300 or 400 or EEB 300 or 400, based on their faculty sponsor's departmental affiliation.

Courses in Molecular, Cellular and Developmental Biology

Courses in Ecology and Evolutionary Biology


BIOLOGY 200. Undergraduate Tutorial.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of faculty member in biology. (2). (Excl). (BS). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It may also be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

BIOLOGY 390. Evolution.

Section 711 — OFFERED ONLY AT THE BIOLOGICAL STATION IN PELLSTON, MICHIGAN.

Instructor(s): Stephen G Pruett-Jones

Prerequisites & Distribution: BIOLOGY 162; prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 305. (5). (Excl). (BS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4 in Ann Arbor; 5 at the Biological Station).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Intended for students who wish both to learn about evolutionary biology and be exposed to the natural history of a region. Lectures will emphasize evolutionary theory as the explanation of observed organic diversity in the northern Michigan region. Field experiments will involve plants and animals, aquatic and terrestrial situations and will utilize observational, experimental, and statistical techniques. Numerous field trips will be taken to understand the importance of human modifications of the environment, biological diversity, and differential survival of organisms.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

BIOLOGY 482. Limnology.

Section 711 — OFFERED ONLY AT THE BIOLOGICAL STATION IN PELLSTON, MICHIGAN.

Instructor(s): Steven Thomas Rier

Prerequisites & Distribution: Three laboratory courses in botany or zoology. (5). (Excl). (BS). Satisfies a Biology laboratory requirement. May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (5 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces the fundamentals of aquatic ecology (with an emphasis on lakes) from an ecosystem-level approach. General limnological principles as well as physical, chemical, and biological parameters of lakes will be studied. Biological investigations include an introduction to the ecology and taxonomy of the algae, zooplankton, macroinvertebrates, macrophytes, and fishes. Field studies include a comparative lake survey in which students will gain experience in field sampling, laboratory analysis of samples, statistical analysis, and interpretation of data for several types of lakes.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


Graduate Course Listings for BIOLOGY.


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This page was created at 8:08 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

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