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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in English

This page was created at 8:32 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Writing is a supremely unnatural act, and that can be a great comfort. Since writing is an acquired skill, we can always change how we write, and we can always make new discoveries about our own potential as writers. This course will introduce you to your power to change as a writer. You will come to experience the joy of learning to use words as efficient tools, the pleasure of developing a style of expression that enhances your ideas, and the satisfaction of exploring your ideas through writing about them. By analyzing mostly non-fiction texts from a variety of academic disciplines, you will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. How and when might you use their conventions in your own writing? How, for example, would a description of a summer meadow change if you revised it to become part of a contemplative essay on your emotional responses to nature, a lab report, a comparison of Romantic and Postmodern attitudes toward nature, an analysis of Annie Dillard's nature writing, or a report on the ecological effects of drilling for oil? In this course, you will have the opportunity to learn the writing skills that will permit you to address such diverse tasks and to express yourself appropriately in the very complex system of social interactions that make up the University.

Basic Course Requirements: 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose, and other (often ungraded) writing at the instructor's discretion.

Educational Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to:
1.Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas
2.Organize essays of varied lengths - from one paragraph to seven pages
3.Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas
4.Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, and
5.Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Laura Krughoff

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course is an introduction to the fundamentals of creative writing. Together we will explore both character and plot development through the reading and writing of short stories and one-act plays. We will discuss tradition, episodic, and lyric short story structure, style, tone, and narrative perspective, along with standard dramatic structure and deviations thereof, conflict and climax, and plotting for play writing. We will read and discuss a wide range of one-act plays and short stories in order to examine the ways in which great writers, both historical and contemporary, have addressed these issues. I intend these two forms, story and play writing, to speak to each other in productive ways as we attempt to understand character psychology and motivation, and what makes for compelling plot. The primary focus of this course, however, will be your own original creative writing. Each of you will workshop at least one short scene and one short story. The goal of any creative writing workshop is to come together as a constructive, supportive, and honest community in which the participants dare to share their work so that each of you can grow as a young writer.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): John Bishop

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section of ENGLISH 223 will focus on drama and fiction (specifically the short story), examining the differences inherent to each style while endeavoring to understand how the study of both can inform fiction and dramatic writing. What techniques are shared by both drama and fiction? How do the elements of voice, plot, conflict, and character development change as we move from one medium to another? Special attention will be paid to narrative structure and characters in opposition. Published plays and short stories will be read and discussed, but the majority of class time will be spent critiquing peer work. A final portfolio of a minimum of 30 pages (including revisions in both genre) will be required at the end of the term.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 223. Creative Writing.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Jaswinder Bolina

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. (2). (CE). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This class will focus on developing students' creative writing skills in the genres of short fiction and poetry. The first half of the term will be dedicated to studying prose forms. We will read several stories from an anthology of short fiction. Students will be expected to write 2-3 page response papers on two of the readings. Students will also be expected to turn in one short story to be read and critiqued by the class. The story should be 8-10 pages in length. The fiction portion of the workshop will conclude with students turning in a substantial revision of the original story. The second half of the term will be dedicated to the writing of poetry. Students will be expected to turn in 5 poems over the course of the half term. These poems will be read and critiqued by the class. The poetry section will conclude with students handing in a final portfolio of revised poems. We will also read two books of poetry. Students will be expected to write 2-3 page response papers on each of the two books.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This advanced writing course focuses on the elements of evidence and argument. Unlike ENGLISH 325 with its emphasis on exploration and style, ENGLISH 225 encourages students to analyze the various components of a given issue and the writing conventions of different disciplines in order to explore and defend their positions, ideas, and beliefs in writing. In the process, they will concentrate on the testing of assumptions and claims, the questioning of beliefs, and the analysis and rigorous articulation of evidence in written discourse. The course stresses the compilation of strong evidence, specifically the use of outside sources and the smooth integration of such material into the prose of an essay. The readings are primarily non-fiction, and discussions and writing assignments emphasize considerations of style, rhetorical strategies, and revision as integral to precision in developing a line of argument for the purposes of reflection as well as persuasion.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Prerequisites are being enforced.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Jason Kirk

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Many courses ask you to slave over a hot argument for two weeks or ten pages, again and again, only for your work to reach and astonish an audience of one, who then gives it a grade and hands it back to fade into lonely obscurity. Not here! We will write, edit, publish, and distribute our own magazine of argument. What's argument? Argrument is NOT apologetic. Argument is NOT dispassionate. Argument is NOT boring. As the Bill of Rights nears the shredder, you find yourself paying attention. We'll go from there, reading and discussing spicy work from a spread of different writers and forums who demonstrate that, with a point and a passion, writing actually can emerge from the blurry and uninspired drivel you find in almost any major newspaper or magazine, into smashing, punchy, interesting prose that matters. Come ready to participate all over the university media drought.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 225. Argumentative Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Sean Norton

Prerequisites & Distribution: Completion of the Introductory Composition requirement. Prerequisites enforced on Wolverine Access. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/english/225/102.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Janice Leach

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/english/239/101.nsf

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Eileen Pollack (epollack@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Through close readings and analyses of a wide variety of short stories, we will develop a deep understanding of how this form works and gain insights into the ways in which all forms of fiction are written and received. Elements to be discussed include characterization, voice, style, structure, dialogue, setting, point of view and theme. In addition to reading stories for every class, students will be required to keep a reading journal and write two four-page critical essays and a five-to-ten page short story.

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ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Tonya Howe

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What is literature? The question is a vexed one, especially in a world increasingly testing the boundaries between literature and other forms of art. We find art in places as expected as the museum and as unexpected as the television screen or the glossy fashion magazine. In this class, we will approach the vexed question of literature through the point of intersection between word and image, between story and scene, between form and content. In order to begin unraveling a problem of this magnitude, we will ask questions like "What is it that we value about art and literature--and how do we value it?"; "What sorts of forces are at work when something is declared 'art' or 'not art'?"; "What is the purpose of art?"; and "What can the visual aspect of language teach us about literature?" Our coursework will include readings touching on key censorship debates, essays by writers writing about their work, examples of "art" and "literature" during a variety of movements, and analyses of advertisements-as-art in print, video, and digital forms. Course requirements will include a reading journal, two 4-5 page essays, a creative project, thoughtfull class participation, and regular attendance.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course discusses and analyzes numerous samples of poetry through history and through its present practitioners. We will ask: What makes a poem, and how do we know this? Can / should poems tell stories? Is poetry oral or written? What is its relationship to song? Who is poetry for? How are expectations of poetry shaped by specific literary periods, political movements, and our own identities in terms of gender, ethnicity, and class? In addition to reading poems selected from an anthology, we will look in detail at the works of at least two contemporary poets. If possible, these will be the same poets that we hear when, as members of an extraordinarily lively writing community, we attend at least one poetry reading held outside of class. Course evaluation will be based on oral contributions (class discussion and an oral presentation), as well as the assigned writings, which include one-page responses to the poetry readings; several short (1-2 page) analyses of specific poems, and one longer (4-5 page) paper that compares several poems in terms of theme, form, and/or imagery. To sharpen our poetry-reading skills, we will also occasionally do some (non-graded) poetry-writing exercises in class. (Meier)

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Laura Kopchick

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Joe Heininger

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

In this course, students read poems, discuss the forms and meanings of poems, and write about the varieties of poetry in English. In the English Renaissance, Philip Sidney wrote that poetry both teaches and delights, and we shall examine poets' innovative uses of language and form to teach and delight us.

We shall explore poets' skills in arranging words and images, and discover the formal and informal pleasures poetry offers. We'll also consider ways in which traditional poetic projects link with the work of later poets, and how others change their shapes or are revised by modern and contemporary poets. To accomplish these aims, we shall read poems by American, British, Irish, and Caribbean writers, and translations from European and classical poets.

Classes typically proceed by class-wide discussion and the occasional lecture. Because active, informed participation in class is required, reading assignments should be carefully prepared, and attendance is mandatory. Students should plan to write weekly short response papers of 1 to 2 typed doublespaced pages, and two longer essays of 5-7 pages each. There will be a final exam.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 317. Literature and Culture.

Section 101 — New England Literature Program.

Instructor(s): Edith K Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). Laboratory fee ($35) required. May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($35) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section is part of the New England Literature Program (NELP). Application deadline was January 8. For those students interested in attending in Spring Half-Term 2004, there will be an information meeting in November 2003, with applications being due the first day of Winter Term 2004. For further information contact Jackie Livesay.

To learn more about NELP, check out our website: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/nelp/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 320 / CAAS 338. Literature in Afro-American Culture.

Section 101 — African American Literature on Racial Passing.

Instructor(s): Nicole Stanton (stantonn@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See CAAS 338.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (2). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will compose thirty pages of polished fiction, complete various exercises, and provide oral and written critiques of one another's stories. We'll also discuss a number of short stories and their authors' commentaries from the anthology. Text: Making Shapely Fiction by Jerome Stern and The Best American Short Stories of 2002 edited by Barbara Kingsolver

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ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Tish O'Dowd (tishod@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (2). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students will compose thirty pages of polished fiction, complete various exercises, and provide oral and written critiques of one another's stories. We'll also discuss a number of short stories and their authors' commentaries from the anthology. Text: Making Shapely Fiction by Jerome Stern and The Best American Short Stories of 2002 edited by Barbara Kingsolver

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 323. Creative Writing.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Sharon Pomerantz

Prerequisites & Distribution: ENGLISH 223 and junior standing. (2). (CE). May be elected for a maximum of 6 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Students write a minimum of 30 pages of fiction for this class. The emphasis is on the workshop process, including oral and written critique of one another's work. We will also read short fiction from two anthologies: You've Got to Read this, edited by Ron Hansen and Jim Shepard; and American Short Story Masterpieces, edited by Raymond Carver and Tom Jenks.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 324. Creative Writing.

Section 101 — Open only to students admitted to the NELP program.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and written permission of instructor. (3 in spring; 2 in summer). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in the summer half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This section is part of the New England Literature Program (NELP). Application deadline was January 8. For those students interested in attending in Spring Half-Term 2003, there will be an information meeting in November 2002, with applications being due the first day of Winter Term 2003. For further information contact Jackie Livesay.

To learn more about NELP, check out our website: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/english/nelp/

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): James Mitchell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Asserting Your Writing Voice In this course students will explore and assert their identities as writers in a community of other writers by reading and responding to a variety of texts drawn from multiple sources. Our objects of study will be multigeneric as well as multimedia, and will include nonfiction, short fiction, film, music, comics, and television. Discussions will focus primarily on issues regarding technique and experimentation. Students will write in a variety of modes, producing at least five essays while extensively collaborating with one another in writing workshops.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 102.

Instructor(s): Lindsay Ellis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 103.

Instructor(s): Kirk Davis

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/english/325/103.nsf

How a thing means depends on how that thing is made. In this course, students will discuss how texts are made, doing so by comparing the process of writing to other creative processes. The class will study the construction of a number of things--appetizers, houses, campsites, works of visual art, and identities, for example--as metaphors for the ways that words can be used to make meaning. The chief goal in this course will be to develop a philosophy of what good expository writing is and what it does. Students will be required to draft and revise three polished essays and several informal writing exercises as a means to this end.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 104.

Instructor(s): Phillip Crymble

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Subtitle: "Dime Store Fiction: Pocket Novels, Pulp Writing and the Psychology of Cold War Culture".

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 105.

Instructor(s): Carol Tell

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

George Orwell wrote that the "great enemy of clear language is insincerity." We might add that sincerity and clear language are great friends. This should be a relief to those students who fear that good essay writing has to do with using big words, manipulating the latest jargon, or writing to "sound smart." Instead of emphasizing how to "sound smart," this course will focus on how to be smart: how to think through complex ideas, challenge comfortable assumptions about difficult topics, come to your own conclusions, and write what you believe. Indeed, part of the process of writing is figuring out what you do think, regardless of whether you are writing a personal narrative, a humorous satire, or an analytical essay. Students will be required to write three 5-7 page essays on topics of their own choosing, complete weekly reading and informal writing assignments, and participate in class discussions and writing workshops.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

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ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 106.

Instructor(s): Scott Hutchins

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

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ENGLISH 331(413) / FILMVID 331. Film Genres and Types.

Section 101 — Sexual Politics & Film Noir.

Instructor(s): Gaylyn Studlar (gstudlar@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: FILMVID 230 or 236. (3). (HU). Laboratory fee ($50) required. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($50) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

See Film and Video Studies 331.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 1 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 473. Topics in American Literature.

Section 101 — Only students admitted into the NELP program can register.

Instructor(s): Edith K Livesay (jlivesay@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3 in IIIA, 2 in IIIB). (Excl). May be elected more than once for credit. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (3; 2 in IIIb).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Spring/Summer Term Courses

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ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

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ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Writing is a supremely unnatural act, and that can be a great comfort. Since writing is an acquired skill, we can always change how we write, and we can always make new discoveries about our own potential as writers. This course will introduce you to your power to change as a writer. You will come to experience the joy of learning to use words as efficient tools, the pleasure of developing a style of expression that enhances your ideas, and the satisfaction of exploring your ideas through writing about them. By analyzing mostly non-fiction texts from a variety of academic disciplines, you will come to understand the conventions writers follow to present their ideas effectively to their chosen audiences. How and when might you use their conventions in your own writing? How, for example, would a description of a summer meadow change if you revised it to become part of a contemplative essay on your emotional responses to nature, a lab report, a comparison of Romantic and Postmodern attitudes toward nature, an analysis of Annie Dillard's nature writing, or a report on the ecological effects of drilling for oil? In this course, you will have the opportunity to learn the writing skills that will permit you to address such diverse tasks and to express yourself appropriately in the very complex system of social interactions that make up the University.

Basic Course Requirements: 20-30 pages of revised, polished prose, and other (often ungraded) writing at the instructor's discretion.

Educational Goals: At the end of the course, students should be able to:
1.Revise argumentative/expository writing in order to improve correctness, appropriateness of expression, and development of ideas
2.Organize essays of varied lengths - from one paragraph to seven pages
3.Use outside sources correctly and effectively in developing ideas
4.Set appropriate individual goals for improving writing and devise effective plans for achieving those goals, and
5.Collaborate with peers to define revision strategies for particular pieces of writing and to set goals for improving writing.

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 125. College Writing.

Section 203, 204, 205, 206 — Open only to Bridge students.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (4). (Introductory Composition). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 226. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 239. What is Literature?

Section 201.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course introduces students to an array of critical approaches in modern literary study. Our central literary reading is Mary Shelley's Frankenstein (1818, 1831), a novel that seems especially available to widely varying analytical styles. We will read a few other literary works and view two films, all in service to our central concern with Shelley's novel and the broad array of critical paradigms that have been applied to it. You should leave this course with a strong sense of the many ways in which we can approach almost all literary texts. Graded work includes examinations, some reading or viewing quizzes, and two papers.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Gorman Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 240. Introduction to Poetry.

Section 202.

Instructor(s): Melanie Boyd

Prerequisites & Distribution: Prerequisite for concentrators in the Regular Program and in Honors. (2). (HU). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The goal of this course is straightforward: to introduce you to the rewards of reading poetry, a literary form with an undeserved reputation for difficulty. This class will build upon the reading skills you already possess (but which you may have previously hesitated to apply to poetry), as well as introducing you to new strategies particularly suited to poetic interpretation. Through our readings, we will explore a variety of different authors and forms; while we will occasionally move about in time and place, our focus will be on American poetry of the last century.

Course requirements include: active participation in classroom discussions and exercises, an in-class presentation, frequent short papers, and two more substantial essays.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 299. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 3 credits.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 315 / WOMENSTD 315. Women and Literature.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Joyce Meier (meierjzz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (HU). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

No Description Provided. Contact the Department.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Angela Balla

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Embodiment and Style What does it mean to be embodied? How do we experience the mystery of our bodies, the myriad ways that they speak to us about their desires and limitations? How do we attempt to manage them so as to communicate our beliefs and values to others? And what can the comportment of others' bodies teach us about how to express ourselves in language that is graceful, principled, and compelling? This class invites you to reflect on your embodied history in ways that experiment with style and context. By looking at examples of decorum that the arts and nature offer, you will discover the aesthetic and ethical principles that guide apt expression. Required materials include literary texts (i.e., essays, short stories, and poems), visual media (i.e., photography, painting, and film), performances (i.e., dance and music), and nature (i.e., parks and gardens). Written requirements include four formal essays (one of which will be a revision), informal responses (such as analysis and imitation), peer critiques, and class participation

NOTE: It is department policy that students must attend both the first and the second class meetings. Failure to do so may result in the student being dropped from the course.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 325. Essay Writing: The Art of Exposition.

Section 202 — Start Where You Are: Exploring the Essay.

Instructor(s): Jean Borger

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Writing begins wherever we are — physically, emotionally, intellectually, geographically, and so on. And it often begins in a state of uncertainty. We may not always know where we're headed or what the implications of our ideas are. We may not feel like our writing is good; we may wonder what other people will think of it. In this course we will explore this uncertain place (along with the other "places" that ground our writing), and we will look at how learning and understanding take place through writing, how, as writers, we may start somewhere and end up somewhere else before we know it.

We will think about the writing skills that you already have in similar terms. What you already know about essay writing is your starting point; from here, it is up to you to build on what you've learned and head off in new directions. We will review "the basics," but we will also explore unusual essay formats and talk about what is to be gained by deliberately breaking the rules at times. The course is designed to allow students to draw from their own interests and set individual writing goals. Some research will be required for two of the three major writing assignments

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 371. Studies in Literature, 1600-1830.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Gorman L Beauchamp (gormanb@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term. Repetition requires permission of the department.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will cover some of the major comic works in English literature from 1660 to 1830: several Restoration comedies, Swift's Gulliver's Travels, Pope's The Rape of the Lock, Fielding's Joseph Andrews, Austen's Pride and Prejudice and, time allowing, Gay's The Beggar's Opera. There will be frequent short written responses to the readings, one longer formal paper, and a final exam.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

ENGLISH 417. Senior Seminar.

Section 201 — The British Romantics and Human Rights.

Instructor(s): David Thomas (dwthomas@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Senior concentrator in English. May not be repeated for credit. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Upper-Level Writing

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course explores the idea of human rights through readings embracing British literary, intellectual, legal and political history. Our historical focus is British romanticism from the 1780s-1820s, and our major subtopics are revolution, slavery and voting reform. Authors include Olaudah Equiano, Edmund Burke, William Godwin, Thomas Bellamy, Robert Southey, William Wordsworth, Mary Wollstonecraft, Mary Shelley and Percy Shelly. The course will proceed as a collaborative research group, with our system of collaboration to be decided once actual course enrollments are clear. Coursework includes library research, in-class presentations and a research project.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

ENGLISH 426. Directed Writing.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing and permission of instructor. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 498. Directed Teaching.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of the instructor. (2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 9 credits.

Credits: (3; 2 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Participation in the teaching of a regularly offered course. Involves readings in educational theory, written work relating to teaching activities, and regular contact with the instructor. (This is an English Department independent study number and is not to be confused with School of Education teaching courses).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

ENGLISH 499. Directed Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Junior standing; and permission of instructor. Not open to graduate students. (1-4). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 6 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Registration only by arrangement with the instructor.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for ENGLISH.


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