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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in German

This page was created at 8:14 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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GERMAN 100. Intensive Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 101, 102 or 103. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (8).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/100/

This is an intensive introductory course equivalent to the first two terms of college German and intended for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies. As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. By the end of the term, students will have been exposed to all the essentials of German grammar, which will then be reviewed and extended in the third and fourth terms. Students will be able to cope with a variety of conversational situations and written texts. In particular, they will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

GERMAN 101. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: All students with prior coursework in German must take the placement test. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/101/

GERMAN 101 is an introductory course for students who have not previously studied German. Few things are more fun and exciting than learning a new language for the first time, and we hope students will approach the course in this spirit. The course focuses systematically on the development of all four basic language skills (listening, speaking, reading, and writing), and aims to do this by taking advantage of the cognitive advantages adult language learners have over children. This means focusing on material that will engage learners' interest, creativity, and sense of humor, as well as on the development of effective language learning strategies.

The course will include in particular a series of videotaped lectures by distinguished University of Michigan German studies faculty on culture, history, economics, philosophy, music, linguistics, and literature, televised over UMTV, which will give students a taste of how they can eventually take advantage of the wide range of language opportunities at the University of Michigan, such as the specialty GERMAN 232 courses (see below) and the subsequent sequences of courses in areas of study ranging from Business and Science to Literature and Philosophy.

By the end of the term, students will have a firm foundation in some of the fundamental elements of German grammar and will be able to understand and respond appropriately to a variety of texts and basic conversational situations.

Required Texts:

  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Text, Houghton Mifflin
  • Lovic, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Workbook, Houghton Mifflin
  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)
  • Audiotape Program Accompanying Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

Recommended:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition, Macmillan
  • Zorach/Melin: English Grammar for Students of German, 4th edition, Olivia & Hill
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning McGraw-Hill
  • Lovik, Guy & Chavez: Vorsprung Computer Study Modules (IBM or Mac) Houghton Mifflin
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

GERMAN 102. Elementary Course.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 101. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 100 or 103. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/102/

This course completes the first year German sequence, and is only open to students who have completed GERMAN 101 at the University of Michigan. By the end of the term, students will have the necessary "survival skills" for a visit to a German-speaking country, as well as a foundation for doing intellectual work in German.

Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Brown: A Practical Guide to Language Learning
  • Vocabulary tapes for Vorsprung (Available at the LRC)

    Recommended Texts for "Free Reading" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the course pack!]:

  • Crossgrove & Crossgrove: Graded German Reader
  • Bürger: Münchhausens Abenteuer
  • Martin: Kein Schnaps für Tamara
  • Sempé/Goscinny: Asterix, Volume 1

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 111. First Special Reading Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The course is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This is a fast-paced course with a substantial workload, intended for students with some experience in language learning, and is therefore recommended only to graduate students who wish to meet a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates who have already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

    GERMAN 111 will not be offered in Fall 2003

    Required Text:

    • Janach, German for Reading Knowledge, 4th Ed., Heinle & Heinle
    Recommended:

    • Terrell, Peter (Ed.), Harper Collins German Unabridged German Dictionary, 4th Ed., Harper Collins

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 231. Second-Year Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103, or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230 or 221. (4). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/231/

    In this course, grammar and vocabulary from the first year will be reviewed and extended. Greater emphasis will be placed on reading German texts and talking and writing about them in German. Reading texts include both short literary works and non-fictional texts from a variety of fields ranging from history to science and the arts.

    By the end of the course, students will be able to read and write about short texts from periodicals and textbooks, and classic texts by Nietzsche and others, independently, so that they will be able to pursue their own specific interests in GERMAN 232 and beyond. Course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.) regular attendance, video assignments, tests, and quizzes.

    Instead of a final examination, students will work in groups to produce short videos, which will be screened on the last day of classes. By the end of the course, students should be quite familiar with all the basics of German grammar, and be able to survive and converse fairly comfortably in a German-speaking country. In particular, they should be ready to embark on an introduction to the study in German of an academic discipline of their choice in one of the specialty GERMAN 232 courses.

    Required Text:

  • Coursepack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Grammar Text [All the grammar you are required to know is in the course pack and on the web, but this book is an excellent reference that would also be helpful to you in the future, and would provide information on many topics for which we do not have enough time in the course.]

  • Wells, Larry D. Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik (grammar text), 2nd Edition

    Recommended Texts for "Language Learning Journals" [see description of "Language Learning Journal" online or in the first few pages of the coursepack; more info on these books is on the main 221/231 course page]:

  • Brothers Grimm: Grimms Märchen
  • Anne Frank: Tagebuch
  • Max Frisch: Andorra
  • Urs Widmer: Liebesbrief für Mary

    Other Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German
  • Wells, Larry D.: Arbeitsbuch (workbook with additional exercises to accompany Handbuch zur deutschen Grammatik).

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 101 — Introduction to German Film.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This fourth-term course provides a creative and entertaining approach to the field of Film Studies in German. Students will read articles on film criticism (English and German) as well as view and discuss German film classics of various periods and genres. In the hands-on part of the course students will shoot a short movie (10-15 min) based on a self-produced script. Workshops in shooting and editing video will be provided. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations, essays, and the script/video-project.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 325. Intermediate German.

    Section 101 — Science, Medicine, and Culture.

    Instructor(s): Susanne Vees-Gulani (vees@umich.edu)

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 232. (3). (Excl). May be elected twice for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    This third-year course explores the role of science and medicine in German culture, the ethical questions related to the respective fields, as well as their interaction with literature and philosophy. Discussions are based on texts, videos, and films, and span a variety of historical and contemporary topics; among them medicine in the middle ages, Röntgen's discovery of X-rays, Freud's psychoanalysis, Nazi medicine, cloning, and genetics, as well as literary and philosophical works. Along the way, we will enhance German reading, writing, and speaking skills. No knowledge of science or medicine is assumed.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

    GERMAN 425. Advanced German.

    Section 101.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 325/326. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (3).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Various approaches will be used to improve the students' written and spoken German. Weekly compositions and subsequent rewrites form an important part of the course work. Most of the topics are assigned by the instructor, but occasionally students may select their own topics. This course also involves readings in nineteenth and twentieth century history and literature in preparation for class discussions, as well as viewings of films and other visual materials. Several presentations are required of each student. German is used exclusively in this course. The final grade is based on the compositions as well as participation in the discussions. GERMAN 426 may be taken independently of GERMAN 425.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


    Spring/Summer Term Courses

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    Summer Half-Term Courses

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    GERMAN 111. First Special Reading Course.

    Meets with German 112.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Undergraduates must obtain permission of the department. (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The objective of this course is to teach students to read simple German expository prose. Students are introduced to the essentials of German grammar, syntax, and vocabulary, both in class lectures and in texts. The course is taught in English, and students are required to read but not write and speak German. This is a fast-paced course with a substantial workload, intended for students with some experience in language learning, and is therefore recommended only to graduate students who wish to meet a German foreign language requirement and to advanced undergraduates who have already met the LS&A foreign language requirement. Course requirements include daily assignments, quizzes, a midterm on grammar and vocabulary, and a final examination requiring the translation of sight passages without the aid of a dictionary. The course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

    GERMAN 111 will not be offered in Fall 2003

    Required Text:

    • Janach, German for Reading Knowledge, 4th Ed., Heinle & Heinle
    Recommended:

    • Terrell, Peter (Ed.), Harper Collins German Unabridged German Dictionary, 4th Ed., Harper Collins

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 112. Second Special Reading Course.

    Meets with German 111.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 111 or the equivalent (placement test). (4). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    The objective of this course is to teach students to read German for research purposes with the aid of a dictionary. Course content includes an intensive review of grammar and syntax followed by translations from texts in the humanities, the natural and social sciences. Choice of reading texts is determined in part by the composition of class. Course requirements include daily preparation and recitation, one examination following the completion of the grammar review, and one examination during the reading of assigned texts. The final examination requires the translation of sight passages with the aid of a dictionary. This course does not satisfy the LS&A foreign language requirement.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 230. Intensive Second-Year Course.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 102 or 103. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 221, 231, or 232. (8). (LR). May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (8).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/230/

    This is an intensive intermediate course, equivalent to two terms of second-year college German, which will reinforce and extend the grammar, vocabulary, speaking, and reading skills developed in first-year German. There will be a wide variety of readings, ranging from newspaper articles to literary, historical, philosophical, and scientific texts; there will also be an entertaining and interesting variety of German movies and videos.

    As part of the "intensive" experience, students will be expected to participate in activities such as regular language tables, movie screenings, and excursions. Regular attendance is imperative. Other course requirements include daily homework assignments (reading, writing, learning vocabulary, etc.), tests, and quizzes.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 1

    GERMAN 232. Second-Year Course.

    Section 201 — Mathematical Scientific German.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: GERMAN 221 or 231 or the equivalent (placement test). No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in GERMAN 230. (4). (LR). All sections of GERMAN 232 address special topics, e.g., music, philosophy, science, current political issues, etc. May not be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (4).

    Course Homepage: http://www.lsa.umich.edu/german/hmr/232Wissenschaftsdeutsch/

    This course serves as an introduction to the tools that are vital for pursuing further science-based work in German — practical or academic. Recently, one of the reasons why students have taken this course has been to prepare themselves for summer internships available with German companies or for study abroad in technical and scientific fields.

    In addition to reading various scientific articles, we will go on excursions to the Hands on Museum, and the Exhibit Museum of Natural History, students will have the opportunity to present some fun experiments in groups; there will be an elementary math lesson (or more if the class is interested) as well as presentations by other guest speakers, etc.

    In addition, we will pause along the way to consider the nature of science and the cultural values that can underlie it, as well as the ethical implications that a rapidly increasing amount of technology and knowledge has on our society today. The necessary vocabulary and grammar will be provided along the way. No background in math or science is assumed. Grades will be based on participation, homework, quizzes, presentations/projects, and exams.

    By the end of the course, students will be ready to pursue an internship or study abroad in Germany, and are strongly encouraged to take advantage of the assistance offered by the German department and by the Office of International Programs in this regard.

    Required Text:

  • Course pack (Available at Excel; 1117 South University; 996-1500)

    Recommended Texts:

  • Webster's New World German Dictionary, Concise Edition;
  • Zorach: English Grammar for Students of German

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

    GERMAN 329. Independent Study.

    Instructor(s):

    Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of chairman. (1-2). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

    Credits: (1-4; 1-2 in the half-term).

    Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

    Independent study for students who need work in a certain area to complete their degrees and are unable to acquire it from a regularly scheduled course.

    Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor


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