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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in History of Art

This page was created at 8:15 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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HISTART 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from HISTART 101 to HISTART 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (HISTART 101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (HISTART 103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 101 — Mystics, Monks, Matrons, and Monarchs: The Illustrated Book and Its Audience in the Later Middle Ages.

Instructor(s): Heather Flaherty (hflaherz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Given the pervasiveness of books in today's society, it is difficult to imagine a time when they were considered a luxury object whose ownership was limited to an elite public. Handcrafted, lavishly ornamented, and vividly illustrated, the medieval book existed in a world far-removed from the public libraries, coffeehouse-bookstores, and e-books of today. This course will focus on the dynamic period of 1200-1500 in order to explore the shifting role of the illustrated book as it came to be used by a greater public than ever before. Writers of medieval romances, astute politicians, learned monks, and women ranging from mystics to princesses are but a few members of the public to whom illustrated manuscripts became increasingly important during the later Middle Ages. As the audience for the book grew, so too did the variety and use of its illustrations. We will examine the increasingly powerful role played by visual imagery in late medieval manuscripts where it was used to authorize, erase, and contest meaning. Course requirements include two exams, a final paper, and several in-class activities. Students also will have the rare opportunity to work firsthand with medieval manuscripts in the University's collections.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 102 — Jan Steen's Humorous Window on the World: Issues in 17th Century Dutch Genre Painting.

Instructor(s): Noel Schiller (nschille@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course will elaborate on issues such as Dutch "realism" as a way of looking at and describing the visible world and the development of artistic specialization and the art market. In discussing Jan Steen's pictorial techniques and his contemporaries, the accent will be placed on the intellectual history of humor in Dutch painting. We will be paying particular attention to the notion of 'domesticity' as it is being rethought in recent years. Students will emerge from the course with a greater understanding of Jan Steen's oeuvre as it is both exceptional and representative of Dutch genre painting in the 17th Century. Each class will be a mixture of lecture, discussion of the readings, and various types of group work.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Spring/Summer Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)



HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

Search the LS&ACourse Guide
(Advanced Search Page)


HISTART 101, 102, 103 and 108, while covering different areas, are all considered equivalent introductions to the discipline of art history. These four introductory survey courses consider not only art objects as aesthetic experiences but also the interactions among art, the artist, and society. The lecture and discussion sections explore the connections between the style and content of works of art and the historical, social, religious, and intellectual phenomena of the time. Attention is also given to the creative act and to the problems of vision and perception which both the artist and his/her public must face.

Although it would be logical to move from HISTART 101 to HISTART 102, this is not required. One course in European/American art (HISTART 101 or 102) and one course in Asian or African art (HISTART 103 or 108) serve as a satisfactory introduction to the history of art for non-concentrators (concentrators should see the department's handbook for more information on requirements). The introductory courses are directed toward students interested in the general history of culture and are especially valuable cognates for students in the fields of history, philosophy, literature, and musicology as well as the creative arts.

Course requirements and texts vary with individual instructors, but an effort is always made to introduce students to works of art in the collections of the university as well as in the museums of Detroit and Toledo. Photographic material is available for study in the Image Study Gallery, G026 Tisch Hall. Examinations usually include short essays and slides which are to be identified, compared, and discussed.


HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 201 — Picturing the Burgundian-Habsburg Netherlands.

Instructor(s): Yao-Fen You (fleuron@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The history of early Netherlandish art has been traditionally viewed through the prism of panel painting, creating a distorted picture of the artistic practices that flourished in fifteenth- and sixteenth-century Flanders. Aside from their mastery of painting on panel with oils (a process for which they are thought to have invented), Flemish artists excelled in the making of tapestries, illuminated manuscripts, embroideries, precious metalwork, carved ivory, armor and composite wooden altarpieces — all of which were created for consumption at home and abroad. Recent research indicates decorative arts like sumptuous tapestries and finely wrought enamel work were preeminent at the time of their creation, besting the art of painting in both production costs, social value, and cultural capital. That these so-called minor arts held more sway than panel painting forces us to reevaluate the privileged position of painting in our study of early Netherlandish art.

This course will introduce students to the wide spectrum of artistic production in the Burgundian-Habsburg Netherlands between 1420 and 1530: we will examine painting in equal parts with other media. The organization of the material will be roughly chronological. Our starting point will be the lavish feasts and spectacular displays of wealth at the court of Philip the Good (1419-1467) at Bruges. Midway we will arrive at the Antwerp Pand, the first open art market of its kind in Europe, where we will encounter a dizzying array of goods for sale. Our final destination will be the Brabantine center of Brussels, home to the Hapsburg court of Emperor Charles V (1500-1558). In the course of our study of the arts of the period across boundaries of media, we will work closely with objects by considering the ways in which we might re-write and re-present the history of early Netherlandish art without painting at the center. Students will be expected to put together a well-argued exhibition proposal in place of a final exam, which might be either an individual or group presentation depending on enrollment. Other course requirements include a short cataloging exercise and a museum label writing exercise, in addition to a mid-term. The "hands-on" assignments will provide opportunities for students to acquire the skills of visual analysis of art objects in different media. To aid our thinking about exhibitions and what exhibition work entails, we will make a field trip to the Cranbrook Museum of Art to view the special exhibit, "Springsteen: Troubador of the Highway," and to the University of Michigan Museum of Art for a behind-the-scenes visit.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 3 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 394. Special Topics.

Section 202 — Introduction to Art in Japan.

Instructor(s): Lisa Langlois (lisalang@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing. (3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course offers a chronological overview of selected artworks, texts, and buildings from the prehistoric to the post-war periods in Japan as seen through thematic frames. As its title suggests, this course distinguishes between 'Japanese Art' (a nineteenth-century invention that discursively attempts to unify historically disparate objects through narratives of cultural continuity) and 'art in Japan' (a complex series of relationships between art producers and consumers). Each week a limited number of objects will be interrogated as we explore how artists and patrons conveyed social meaning through various media and viewing practices. No previous knowledge of either art history or Japanese studies is required for this course, which will introduce students to selected aspects of the visual culture of Japan. Each student will complete an original research project (8-10 page paper) based on an object in the holdings on the UMMA.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: 2 Waitlist Code: 4

HISTART 399. Independent Study.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Upperclass standing, and Permission of instructor. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Supervision of each student's work is assigned to an appropriate member of the staff.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Graduate Course Listings for HISTART.


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This page was created at 8:15 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

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