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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

Note: You must establish a session for the correct term (Spring, Summer, or Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003) on wolverineaccess.umich.edu in order to use the link "Check Times, Location, and Availability". Once your session is established, the links will function.

Courses in Judaic Studies

This page was created at 8:17 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



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JUDAIC 496. Independent Studies.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of instructor required. (1-3). (Excl). (INDEPENDENT). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

An independent studies course under the supervision of one of the Judaic Studies faculty members.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Spring/Summer Term Courses

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JUDAIC 317. Topics in Judaic Studies.

Section 001 — Anthropology of Contemporary Jewish Life. [3 Credits]. Meets with ANTHRCUL 298.205.

Instructor(s): Erica Lehrer

Prerequisites & Distribution: (Excl). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

What does it mean to be Jewish — at particular times, and in different places? Is it a religion? a race? An ethnic group? a nationality? Jews can be found in almost every country in the world. But who are they? And what (or who) makes them Jewish? While many Jewish institutions decry intermarriage and the decline of community participation, Jewishness is alive and well in diverse communities, in institutions, in rituals, in personal histories and identities. Rather than trying to establish what is the "right" or "authentic" way to be Jewish, we will try to understand how people create and experience a variety of Jewish identities, and how those identities are shaped by internal and external social forces. Even "traditional" or "orthodox" Jews spend the majority of their time doing things besides practicing their religion, and we will consider how, when, and why some of those things are seen, felt, and labeled as Jewish.

If you're interested in religion, race, ethnicity, cultural boundaries, immigrant experiences, inter-generational conflict, tradition vs. modernity, marginality, cultural responses to genocide, diaspora, collective memory, or new trends in social science, this course will give you a chance to broaden and deepen your thinking.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


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This page was created at 8:17 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.

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