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Spring/Summer Academic Term 2003 Course Guide

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Courses in Sociology

This page was created at 8:25 PM on Mon, Jul 14, 2003.



Spring Half-Term Courses

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SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Todd Goodsell (tgoodsel@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/100/101.nsf

Community studies include many of the oldest and most well known sociological research work. This course will provide a survey of the tradition through reading several of the community studies (ten, to be exact) that have helped to define our discipline. In selecting which community studies to read, I emphasized the development of the urban ethnographic tradition and what is called the "Chicago School." The goal is that after having taken this class, you will be prepared to study any of several subfields in sociology- criminology, gender, race, poverty, etc. And when someone refers back to one of these classic works, you'll know what they're talking about! After we finish the ten community studies, we'll finish off the semester with two views on the Chicago School- one from early in the tradition and one that is contemporary.

Our analysis of each work will center on a core set of issues:

·The meaning of community

·Research methods used to study community

·Social categories that organize how we think about the world, including race/ethnicity, work, gender, family, social stratification, crime, and religion

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 122 / PSYCH 122. Intergroup Dialogues.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2). (Excl). May not be included in a concentration in psychology or sociology. May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 4 credits.

Credits: (2).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/psych/122/101.nsf

See Psychology 122.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 1. Questions about this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 210. Elementary Statistics.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Sapna Swaroop (sswaroop@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Sociology Honors students should elect this course prior to beginning the Honors Seminar sequence. Sociology concentrators should elect this course during their third year. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in STATS 100, 350, 265, 311, 350, 405, or 412, or ECON 404 or 405. (3). (MSA). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/210/101.nsf

This course is designed to introduce students to basic statistics used in sociological research, emphasizing quantitative data description and data analysis. In this course, students will learn how to become consumers of statistics by interpreting statistical analysis in published social science research, and become producers of statistics by using statistical techniques to describe and make inferences about the social world, both by hand and through a statistical software package, SPSS. This class will be fast-paced and rigorous. Grading will be based on engagement with the course material, five assignments, and a midterm and final examination.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 303 / CAAS 303. Race and Ethnic Relations.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Gloria Martinez (gpmtz@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: An introductory course in sociology or CAAS; CAAS 201 recommended. (3). (SS). (R&E). May not be repeated for credit.

R&E

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/303/101.nsf

This course focuses on demographic changes and contemporary issues of race and ethnicity in the United States. Our goal is to examine sociological theories of race and ethnic relations and to understand how the social construction of race influenced organizations, institutions, and identities. We will discuss the experiences of several racial and ethnic groups including Native Americans, African Americans, European Americans, Latinos and Asian Americans. In addition, we will focus on contemporary issues related to racial inequality in the post civil rights era including immigration, residential segregation, education, employment, and health.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 305. Introduction to Sociological Theory.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Cedric De Leon (cdeleon@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology course. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 405. (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course uses the lens of Marxism to focus an investigation into the thought of three giants in sociology. In doing so, the course-unlike most-stresses the commonalities among Marx, Weber, and Durkheim, while giving due acknowledgement to their differences. Since this is a 300-level course, the instructor assumes some limited exposure to the three intellectual lineages in questions, and seeks to work with students to clarify some of the popular interpretations of Marxism. This course provides an opportunity to undergraduates who have heard the basics to engage these thinkers, in a fun and fresh new light.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor

SOC 310. Introduction to Research Methods.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Angel Harris (angelh@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology; or completion of one social science course in economics, anthropology, political science, psychology or other sociology course; Sociology concentrators are strongly encouraged to elect this course in the Junior year. Sociology Honors students should elect this course concurrently with SOC 397. (3). (Excl). (BS). (QR/1). May not be repeated for credit.

Full QR

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Sociology 310 is a general introduction to social research methods. It is designed to introduce students to the intent and procedures of contemporary sociological methods. The course is divided into four parts. The first two weeks (part 1) will consist of an introduction to scientific/systematic observations, which includes coverage of the nature and logic of scientific inquiry and the conceptual process that researchers engage in prior to conducting research that guides the research process. In weeks 3 and 4 (part 2) the course will cover research design (i.e., modes of observation). We will discuss the factors determining the selection of particular data gather techniques, their strengths and weaknesses, and the ethical and political issues that researchers may encounter during the research process. Operationalization, sampling, and data analysis will be covered in weeks 5 and 6 (part 3). Students will learn how to determine what to measure, how to measure it, among what or whom to measure it from, and how to analyze what was measured. The final two weeks (part 4) are designed to allow students the opportunity to discuss and apply the material in a seminar-type setting. Although particular emphasis will be placed on the building and confirming of theoretical models, the course is also appropriate for students interested in applied/problem solving research.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 321 / PSYCH 311. Practicum in Facilitating Intergroup Dialogues.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Kelly E Maxwell (kmax@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: SOC 320 and permission of instructor. (3). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (EXPERIENTIAL). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/psych/311/101.nsf

See Psychology 311.101.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Instructor. Questions regarding anything to do with this course should be directed to the Intergroup Relations Program, 936-1875, 3000 Michigan Union.

SOC 344. Marriage and the Family: A Sociological Perspective.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Sheila Bluhm Morley (sbluhm@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in Sociology. (3). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/344/101.nsf

Sociology of Marriage and the Family explores intimate relationships and the American family from various sociological perspectives. Various topics addressed in this course include singlehood, love, sexuality, arranged and love marriages, civil unions and same sex marriages, parenting, employment, gender roles, domestic violence, child maltreatment, conflict, divorce, remarriage, and late life families. Students are also given opportunity for individual research to focus their studies on specific aspects of the family that hold the most interest for them.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/projectcommunity/

SOC 389 is known as Project Community. Students combine three to four hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem–solving.

Students enrolled in SOC 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete weekly reflective journal assignments, a midterm paper/project, and a final paper/project.

Questions and override requests must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

All students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course_PC.html PRIOR to registering for a SOC 389/Project Community section.

For details on what is offered, please see the specific section description on the website.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is provided to all students and is coordinated through the Project Community office.

If a particular section is full, please e–mail Sean de Four (seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

Michigan Community Scholars Program (MCSP)

Section 119 - EDUCATIONAL OUTREACH - HIV/AIDS RESOURCE CENTER: WASHTENAW COUNTY. (2-4 credits).
Section 120 - COMMUNITY ECONOMIC DEVELOPMENT PROJECTS - FOCUS HOPE: DETROIT. (2-4 credits).
Section 121 - TBA. (2-4 credits).

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 447 / WOMENSTD 447. Sociology of Gender.

Section 101.

Instructor(s): Cara Bergstrom (cbergstr@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: http://coursetools.ummu.umich.edu/2003/spring/soc/447/101.nsf

This course examines gender inequalities through a sociological lens. It is designed to question the neatly organized categories of gender, sex, and sexuality that have dominated academic and popular discourse. Each week, we will address critical questions that have enjoyed vigorous debate in recent years, such as: How are sex and gender socially constructed? How has feminism been modified over the years to better understand gender? In what ways are bodies gendered by everyday activities? What can the lives of children and adolescents tell us about gender constructions? What is the connection between sexual identities and gender categories? Where do masculinities fit in? How do families create and reinforce gender constructions? How are the worlds of work gendered, both in the U.S. and cross-nationally? What role does the state play in regulating gender, especially through reproductive policies, social welfare services, and (sex) tourism? Throughout the course, we will pay particular attention to the intersectionalities of race, ethnicity, class, gender, sexuality, and nation.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Spring/Summer Term Courses

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SOC 389. Practicum in Sociology.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: (2-4). (Excl). Offered mandatory credit/no credit. Up to four credits of SOC 389 may be included in a concentration plan in sociology. A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in sociology. Laboratory fee ($40) required. (EXPERIENTIAL). May be elected for a maximum of 8 credits. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (2-4).

Lab Fee: Laboratory fee ($40) required.

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

All students must view the web site: http://www.umich.edu/~mserve/ProjectCommunity/HTML/course_PC.html PRIOR to registering for a Soc 389 Project Community section. Questions and overrides must be directed to the Project Community Office, 1024 Hill Street, 647-8771, Sean de Four, seafour@umich.edu.

Sociology 389 is known as Project Community." Students combine four to six hours of weekly service in community settings, with weekly student-led seminars. Seminars are interactive, focus on related sociological issues, and provide a time for mutual support, planning, and problem–solving.

Students enrolled in Sociology 389 are responsible for regular attendance in the weekly seminar as well as regular participation at the designated community service site. Students will be asked to complete reflective journal assignments, a short midterm written assignment, and a final paper/project.

NOTE: All sections of Sociology 389 will commence in the first week of class. There will NOT be a delayed start.

Over 35 community service settings are available. They include schools, hospitals, correctional facilities, a domestic violence shelter, advocacy agencies, and care organizations. For details, please see the specific section description.

Transportation to off-campus service sites is available through Project Community.

WL:2. If a particular section is full, please e–mail Sean de Four(seafour@umich.edu) to be added to the waitlist.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of instructor. STUDENTS SHOULD GO TO 2205 MICHIGAN TO OBTAIN OVERRIDE.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department


Summer Half-Term Courses

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SOC 100. Principles of Sociology.

Introductory courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Claire Decoteau (cdecotea@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Open to first- and second-year students. Juniors are strongly encouraged to enroll in SOC 300. Seniors must elect SOC 300. No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in SOC 195 or 300. No credit for seniors. (3). (SS). May not be included in a concentration plan. (Introductory course). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

The scope of the discipline of Sociology is immense. Therefore, this introductory course is designed to cover components of both the Sociological canon and some key contemporary issues in the field. It will begin with an exploration of key Sociology theory, from the 'Founding Fathers' of Sociology to imminent modern theorists. The course will then examine the three main axes of inequality: class, race, and gender/sexuality. However, in addition to exploring classical approaches to these inequalities, the course will ask the students to challenge these categories and their legitimacy in the post-modern world in several ways. First, we will analyze the ways in which these categories overlap and intersect. Next, we will explore other axes of social inequality, first, by pushing national boundaries through an exploration of global capitalism and world systems theory, and finally, by discussing the issues of disability, age, and disease. We will end the course by analyzing our own educational system and how the Sociological issues we have explored throughout the class relate to experiences within the classroom.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 202. Contemporary Social Issues I.

Introductory courses

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Andrew Clarno (aclarno@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: Credit is granted for a combined total of eight credits elected through SOC 202, 203, and 401, provided that the course topics are different. (3). (Excl). (Introductory course). May be repeated for credit for a maximum of 8 credits.

Credits: (2-4; 3 in the half-term).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

How did the system of global capitalism develop? How does it operate? What is 'globalization' and why are people resisting it? Where do we fit into the system and what can we do about it? The course begins with classic readings on the development and dynamics of the global capitalist system. We will then explore the intersections of class, race, gender, and nationalism and the dynamics of contemporary capitalism in the United States. During the second half of the course, we will focus on contemporary neo-liberal capitalism. In this section, we will combine theoretical readings with detailed informative readings on the World Bank, the IMF, the WTO, debt crises, famines, structural adjustment programs, and emerging forms of resistance to global capitalism. Throughout the course, we will consider our own positions within the capitalist system and develop an understanding of the practical ways in which we can contribute to shaping or resisting that system.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 368(468). Criminology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Frederique Laubepin (flaubepi@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: One sociology introduction. (4). (SS). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Crime is among the most discussed issues in the United States. This course explores major issues in the sociological study of crime and provides an overview of criminological theories to better understand the rates and distribution of crime in the United States. As we endeavor to answer deceptively simple questions such as: "What is crime? Who commits crime? What are the causes of crime? How can crime be reduced?" students will sharpen their grasp on the complexity of the crime problem, and acquire the theoretical tools necessary for a rigorous analysis of crime in American society. First we will cover the foundations of criminology and basic concepts in the study of crime. Then, rather than offering a broad survey of the field of criminology, we will seek to understand and critically evaluate the major theories that have been advanced by sociologists and criminologists to explain crime and criminal justice issues.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 395. Directed Reading or Research.

Instructor(s):

Prerequisites & Distribution: Permission of concentration advisor and supervising staff member. (1-4). (Excl). A combined total of eight credits of SOC 321, 389, and 395 may be counted toward a concentration in Sociology. (INDEPENDENT). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-4).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

For undergraduate students interested in work not available within the framework of regular Departmental offerings (either work beyond the scope of present course offerings for students who have completed available courses with at least a grade of B or work in areas not available through existing course work for students with a 3.0 grade point average). Student should contact faculty member with whom they want to work to arrange topic and workload.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: 5, Permission of Department

SOC 423 / AMCULT 421. Social Stratification.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Justin Thomas (thomasjl@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

This course focuses on individual and structural explanations for the generation and maintenance of stratification in the United States and the influence of inequality on individuals and groups. The purpose of the class is to develop an understanding of the fundamental concepts, facts, and methods in the sociological analysis of social stratification. While a majority of the literature used in class is from the sociological perspective, sources from other disciplines are also incorporated. Throughout the course, we will cover topics including: sources of stratification; the structure of contemporary stratification; social mobility; status and income attainment; stratification in the labor market; gender stratification; and racial and ethnic inequality.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 475 / MEDCARE 475. Introduction to Medical Sociology.

Section 201.

Instructor(s): Joel Purkiss (purkissj@umich.edu)

Prerequisites & Distribution: (3). (Excl). May not be repeated for credit.

Credits: (3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

Why do physicians in the U.S. currently provide higher-quality healthcare and advice to whites than to racial minorities with the same diseases and some incomes, according to a large and reliable 2002 study? Why do industrialized nations have such different rates for medical ("non-religious") circumcision? Why do some lethal diseases receive great amounts of worldwide recognition and attention from officials and the public, while other lethal diseases are rarely discussed? This course begins to answer these and other questions by introducing students to an important sub-field of sociology. Medical sociology looks beyond individual-level factors, such as biology, to examine how social, political, and cultural factors affect health and illness. The core concepts, theoretical approaches, and research areas within medical sociology will be presented and discussed. By completing the course, students will be able to apply the perspectives of medical sociology to critically examine health and illness both in the U.S. and cross-culturally.

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.

SOC 495. Special Course.

Section 201 — Sociology Through Literature.

Instructor(s): Michael Lowy

Prerequisites & Distribution: One introductory course in sociology. (1-3). (Excl). May be repeated for credit. May be elected more than once in the same term.

Credits: (1-3).

Course Homepage: No homepage submitted.

I. Art and literature as sociological knowledge

1)Introduction

2)Flemish painting of the XVth century : Jan Van Eyck

3)Flemish painting of the XVth century : Hyeronimus Bosch

II. Literature as sociology

4) Introduction

5) Realism, romanticism

III. Scott Fitzgerald and « conspicuous consumption »

6) Fitzgerald's Short Stories

7) Thorstein Veblen, The Theory of the Leisure Class

8) The Great Gatsby : conspicuous consumption

9) The Great Gatsby : reification

IV) Franz Kafka on bureaucracy

10) Max Weber on bureaucracy

11) Alfred Weber on the employees

12) Introduction to Kafka

13) America

14) The Penal Colony

15) The Trial

16) The Castle

17) « Kafkaesque situation »

V) Conclusion

18) The specificity of literature as sociology

Check Times, Location, and Availability Cost: No Data Given. Waitlist Code: No Data Given.


Graduate Course Listings for SOC.


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