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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = AAPTIS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 46 of 46
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
AAPTIS 102 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Bardenstein,Carol B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 102 is the second of a two-term sequence in Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (EMSA), which is designed for concentrators, students wanting to satisfy the language requirement, and those who wish to study Arabic for communication and academic purposes. Having learned the alphabet and completed the first five chapters of al-Kitaab in the first part of the sequence, we will continue building on basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structures through situational dialogues, short reading passages, grammar presentation, and written and oral drills. The course offers combined training in the four primary language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The language of instruction and interaction in class will be Arabic for the most part. By the end of the two-term sequence, students will have mastered the basics of Arabic grammar, with a working vocabulary and communicative competence that will enable them to pursue further more specialized Arabic study. Evaluation is based on class participation, quizzes, three periodic exams, and regular written and other assignments. The class meets five hours per week for five credit hours.

Textbook: Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part One (Lessons 8-15).

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 101.

AAPTIS 102 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Reading,Liana Danielle
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5

This is the second course of a two term sequence in Elementary Arabic. It is designed for concentrators and those who need Arabic to satisfy the language requirement. In AAPTIS 102 the focus on acquisition of the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures continue through grammar presentations and oral and written practice based on reading passages including narration and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading and writing skills as well as communicative activities involving student-teacher, student-student, and group interactions. There are written assignments requiring students to supply answers to certain drills and questions, filling out forms, and writing messages and short paragraphs related to the topics of the reading passages. Evaluation is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and final exam including an oral component. Use of the CDs accompanying the textbook at home is required to reinforce new vocabulary and class work. The class meets five hours per week for five credit hours.

Textbook: Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part One (Lessons 8-15).

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 101.

AAPTIS 102 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Khalil,Mohammad Hassan
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5

This is the second course of a two-term sequence in Elementary Arabic. It is designed for concentrators and those who need Arabic to satisfy the language requirement. In AAPTIS 102 the focus on acquisition of the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures continue through grammar presentations and oral and written practice based on reading passages including narration and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading and writing skills as well as communicative activities involving student-teacher, student-student, and group interactions. There are written assignments requiring students to supply answers to certain drills and questions, filling out forms, and writing messages and short paragraphs related to the topics of the reading passages. Evaluation is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and final exam including an oral component. Use of the CDs accompanying the textbook at home is required to reinforce new vocabulary and class work. The class meets five hours per week for five credit hours.

Textbook: Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part One (Lessons 8-15).

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 101.

AAPTIS 102 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 004, REC

Instructor: Sabbagh,Hani R
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5

This is the second course of a two-term sequence in Elementary Arabic. It is designed for concentrators and those who need Arabic to satisfy the language requirement. In AAPTIS 102 the focus on acquisition of the basic vocabulary and fundamental structures continue through grammar presentations and oral and written practice based on reading passages including narration and description. There is increased emphasis on developing conversational, reading and writing skills as well as communicative activities involving student-teacher, student-student, and group interactions. There are written assignments requiring students to supply answers to certain drills and questions, filling out forms, and writing messages and short paragraphs related to the topics of the reading passages. Evaluation is based on class participation, quizzes, midterm, and final exam including an oral component. Use of the CDs accompanying the textbook at home is required to reinforce new vocabulary and class work. The class meets five hours per week for five credit hours.

Textbook: Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part One (Lessons 8-15).

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 101.

AAPTIS 102 — Elementary Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 005, REC

Instructor: Bariun,Fawzia M
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5

AAPTIS 102 is the second of a two-term sequence in Elementary Modern Standard Arabic (EMSA), which is designed for concentrators, students wanting to satisfy the language requirement, and those who wish to study Arabic for communication and academic purposes. Having learned the alphabet and completed the first five chapters of al-Kitaab in the first part of the sequence, we will continue building on basic vocabulary and fundamental grammatical structures through situational dialogues, short reading passages, grammar presentation, and written and oral drills. The course offers combined training in the four primary language skills: listening comprehension, speaking, reading and writing. The language of instruction and interaction in class will be Arabic for the most part. By the end of the two-term sequence, students will have mastered the basics of Arabic grammar, with a working vocabulary and communicative competence that will enable them to pursue further more specialized Arabic study. Evaluation is based on class participation, quizzes, three periodic exams, and regular written and other assignments. The class meets five hours per week for five credit hours.

Textbook: Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part One (Lessons 6-15).

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 101.

AAPTIS 112 — Classical Arabic II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Romanov,Maxim
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 102 or 482.

AAPTIS 112 is a continuation of AAPTIS 111. It aims at further development of students' reading and translation skills through short texts selected from Classical/Islamic literature including Hadith and the Qur'an. There is an emphasis on extensive use of the Arabic-English dictionary and analysis of grammatical points to aid in translating and comprehending texts.

Intended audience: Undergraduates who are primarily interested in Arabic for research and academic purposes.

Course Requirements: Attendance and participation, daily written assignments, quizzes, midterm, and final exam.

Class Format: This course meets five hours per week in a recitation format taught by faculty or GSIs.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 111

AAPTIS 142 — Elementary Persian, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Aghaei,Behrad

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in AAPTIS 143.

This course is the continuation of AAPTIS 141. All four language skills, speaking, listening, reading, and writing, will be emphasized. The class will be conducted in Persian with occasional recourse to English for grammatical explanations. There will be daily assignments and in-class conversation groups. By the end of the term, students will have acquired an adequate knowledge of all major points of Persian grammar. They will be able to conduct simple conversations in Persian, read non-technical simple prose, and write passages on a variety of topics. Grading will be based on attendance, homework, quizzes, a midterm and final examination. Incoming students may join the class pending examination and approval by the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 141.

AAPTIS 152 — Elementary Turkish, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Er,Mehmet Sureyya

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 155.

Part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish language, this course aims at introducing and providing the opportunity to practice the basic structures of Turkish. Although it specifically focuses on enhancing spoken proficiency, reading and writing skills are taught and practiced through special readings and written assignments. Students are evaluated in accordance with the provisional Proficiency Guidelines prepared by the American Association of Teachers of Turkic Languages, class participation, achievements in weekly quizzes, and a final examination. Textbook: Kurtulus Oztopcu, Elementary Turkish.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 151 or equivalent

AAPTIS 202 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

This course continues combined class work based on Al-Kitab Part Two and interactive multimedia lessons. It aims at developing students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to:

  1. participate with educated Arabs in simple conversations about personal accommodation needs, elicit and supply biographical information and provide short description of people, places, and things
  2. read, comprehend and translate short printed passages including news items, simple narratives and descriptions and
  3. write notes and short personal letters to friends as well as short descriptions.

Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, quizzes, midterm and a final examination including an oral component. The course meets five hours a week for five credits.

Textbooks:

  1. Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part Two (Lessons 1-3) and
  2. multi-media program (Lessons 6-10) available in the Computer Lab at the Language Resource Center in MLB.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 201.

AAPTIS 202 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Hanoosh,Yasmeen S
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

This course continues combined class work based on Al-Kitab Part Two and interactive multimedia lessons. It aims at developing students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to:

  1. participate with educated Arabs in simple conversations about personal accommodation needs, elicit and supply biographical information and provide short description of people, places, and things
  2. read, comprehend and translate short printed passages including news items, simple narratives and descriptions and
  3. write notes and short personal letters to friends as well as short descriptions.

Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, quizzes, midterm and a final examination including an oral component. The course meets five hours a week for five credits.

Textbooks:

  1. Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part Two (Lessons 1-3) and
  2. multi-media program (Lessons 6-10) available in the Computer Lab at the Language Resource Center in MLB.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 201.

AAPTIS 202 — Intermediate Modern Standard Arabic, II
Section 003, REC

Instructor: Boulos,Taroob Rafoul
Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Other: Lang Req

This course continues combined class work based on Al-Kitab Part Two and interactive multimedia lessons. It aims at developing students' listening, speaking, reading and writing skills. Students who successfully complete the course are expected to:

  1. participate with educated Arabs in simple conversations about personal accommodation needs, elicit and supply biographical information and provide short description of people, places, and things
  2. read, comprehend and translate short printed passages including news items, simple narratives and descriptions and
  3. write notes and short personal letters to friends as well as short descriptions.

Course grade is based on class attendance and participation, quizzes, midterm and a final examination including an oral component. The course meets five hours a week for five credits.

Textbooks:

  1. Brustad et al., Al-Kitab Part Two (Lessons 1-3) and
  2. multi-media program (Lessons 6-10) available in the Computer Lab at the Language Resource Center in MLB.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 201.

AAPTIS 242 — Intermediate Persian, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Aghaei,Behrad

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Persian 243.

This course is a continuation of AAPTIS 241. The emphasis will be increasingly on reading, composition, and dialogue with the objective of achieving intermediate competency. The two main textbooks are Windfuhr-Bostanbakhsh, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level, I. and Windfuhr, Modern Persian, Intermediate Level II. Additional materials include tapes and videos. Special needs or interests of the students will be taken into consideration.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 241.

AAPTIS 252 — Intermediate Turkish, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Er,Mehmet Sureyya

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in Turkish 255.

Part of the department sequence in modern Turkish, this course will be an immediate continuation of AAPTIS 251 as taught in the preceding fall term. The aim is to further improve proficiency skills in listening, speaking, reading and writing, according to the guidelines of the AATT. Textbook materials will be supplemented by short original texts from literature and newspapers in accordance with the students' progress. Additional material for training in communicative situations will be used. Evaluation will be based on classroom participation, homework, quizzes, and Final.

Textbooks: Sumru Ozsoy, Turkish and Tuncay Ozturk et al., Adim Adim Turkce (Ders Kitabi 3-4)

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 251.

AAPTIS 262 — Introduction to Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course provides a comprehensive introduction to Islam as a religious tradition. After examining the fundamental sources of Islam, particularly the Qur'an and the Reports about the activities and sayings of the Prophet Muhammad, we discuss how these foundations gave rise to the beliefs and practices of Muslims and to an Islamic civilization with spectacular achievements in such areas.

AAPTIS 269 — Introduction to Turkish Civilizations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This lecture-and-discussion course will teach the basic features of Turkish civilizations from the earliest time in the 6th century to the 20th century, from the viewpoint of cultural history. We will discuss the issue of bonds between the Turkish peoples on both the linguistic and on the cultural level. Besides an overview of the history of Turkish Empires with a special focus on the Ottoman Empire, emphasis will be placed on common cultural elements. These include tribal origins and tribal life, myths of origins as preserved in the epic literature, religious developments from "shamanism" to monotheistic religions, as well as aspects of material culture and arts.

Regular attendance and participation in the discussions, a midterm paper and a final paper will determine success in this course.

Textbook: Carter Findley: The Turks in world history. New York : Oxford University Press, 2005.

More (mandatory) readings will be made available through a course website (tba).


AAPTIS 272 — Intermediate Western Armenian, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Other: Lang Req

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ARMENIAN 273/AAPTIS 273

This course concentrates on reading Armenian texts with commentaries on grammatical and stylistic points, and an equal emphasis on conversation and frequent written work. Grade is based on performance, attendance, and a final examination. The reading material consists of literature appended to Bardakjian's and Thomson's A Textbook of Modern Western Armenian and a course pack.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS/ARMENIAN 271 or equivalent

AAPTIS 331 — Introduction to Arab Culture: Race, Ethnicity, and Gender Issues
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, ULWR, HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed to give students an extensive survey of the cultural characteristics of the Arab world by situating the practices and traditions of the Arab world into their own unique setting. The material chosen, both for the lecture and for reading, focuses on issues of ethnic diversity that define the Arab world in particular and place into a greater multi-cultural realm. Special attention will be given to family, gender relations, national and religious minorities, East-West cultures and relations, the role of the past and of social change, and Arabic art and music. The course material will be explored through lectures and videos supported by listening and viewing guides in addition to discussion based upon the assigned readings. In both their writings and in the class discussions, students discuss the meaning of culture and ethnicity and how misunderstanding these principles can lead to forms of stereotyping, intolerance, and racism. There will be emphasis on developing effective outlining, writing, and oral presentation skills. Moreover, the course is accompanied by an interactive website utilizing the UM Course Tools Software. Grades will be based upon class participation, short essays, and a final project. Material: Course pack and website.

AAPTIS 352 — Advanced Turkish II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Er,Mehmet Sureyya

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Since this course is part of the departmental sequence in modern Turkish, admission to it is dependent on satisfactory completion of AAPTIS 252 or its equivalent as determined by the instructor. It is designed to further develop reading and comprehension competence in a variety of Turkish styles; stories, poems, newspaper and learned articles, political tracts, government publications, etc. The method of instruction is through recitation including preparation, reading and oral or written translation of texts in class or at home with discussion of grammar, style and content. Students are evaluated on the class preparation, a midterm and final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 351 or EQ

AAPTIS 395 — Directed Undergraduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 404 — Advanced Modern Standard Arabic II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is the second part of Modern Standard Arabic at the advanced level. The course continues training in developing listening, soeaking, reading and writing skills through a variety of exercises and activities based on the last three lessons in Al-Kitab, Part Two and the last five lessons of the interactive multimedia program. In addition, the course aims to begin developing participants' awareness of what the producers of text are trying to achieve, and how they go about doing so. Evaluation is based on class attendance, participation, written assignments, and exams.

Textbooks

  • Al- Kitab, fi Ta'allum al-'arabiyya A Textbook for Arabic Part Two by Brustad et al. (Lessons 8-10).
  • The Hans Wehr Dictionary of Modern Written Arabic, (Arabic- English Dictionary), Edited by J.M Cowan.

Evaluation is based on class attendance, participation, written assignments, and exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 403 or equivalent.

AAPTIS 418 — Colloquial Levantine Arabic, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Sabbagh,Hani R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The 417-418 sequence provides extensive oral and communicative practice based on situational dialogues as used by native speakers in Jerusalem, Amman, Damascus and Beirut. Emphasis is placed on basic principles of pronunciation, grammar and functional vocabulary, the practical use of dialect through interactive communicative tasks, and cultural and social conventions. This sequence may be taken by students who have completed one year of Arabic to satisfy the LSA foreign language requirement.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 417.

AAPTIS 418 — Colloquial Levantine Arabic, II
Section 002, REC

Instructor: Sabbagh,Hani R

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The 417-418 sequence provides extensive oral and communicative practice based on situational dialogues as used by native speakers in Jerusalem, Amman, Damascus and Beirut. Emphasis is placed on basic principles of pronunciation, grammar and functional vocabulary, the practical use of dialect through interactive communicative tasks, and cultural and social conventions. This sequence may be taken by students who have completed one year of Arabic to satisfy the LSA foreign language requirement.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 417.

AAPTIS 433 — Arabic Syntax and Semantics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Samy,Waheed A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will look closely at the structure and semantics of Modern Standard Arabic There will be focus on form and meaning. Students will be trained to analyze extended chunks of text, as opposed to individual sentences. The course will be conducted in English, but it is advisable that students should have at least two years of Arabic. Course grade is based on assignments, quizzes and exams. Course materials will both modern and medieval views of syntax.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 202 and 432.

AAPTIS 462 — The Rise of Islam
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course provides an intensive introduction to the history of the rise of Islam. The period covered is roughly 500-950 CE.

It covers:

  • the Near Eastern and Mediterranean world in late antiquity;
  • Arabia before Islam;
  • the life of Muhammad and the earliest Muslim community;
  • the early Islamic conquests in the Near East, Central Asia, North Africa, and Spain;
  • the Caliphate as a political structure;
  • the emerging systems of Islamic theology and law; and
  • the astonishingly rapid growth and flourishing of a new, Islamic civilization throughout much of the Old World.

Major themes include:

  • contact and conflict between urban and nomadic populations;
  • political and sectarian divisions;
  • relations among the various religions and peoples;
  • travel and commerce;
  • new forms in literature, architecture and other areas.

Much of the reading consists of original sources translated from the Arabic. The great world history of al-Tabari (839-923) provides a constant point of reference, as look back at these events from al-Tabari's perspective.

Prerequisites. It is best if you already have the basic background course, AAPTIS 461 / History 442 or equivalent. However, this is not strictly required, if you can convince the instructor.

Requirements. These include a midterm examination, a final examination, and occasional short quizzes. Four short papers will also be assigned, 3-5 pages each. Topics for the first three papers will be assigned in class; the fourth paper will be on a topic of your choice.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor. Taught in English.

AAPTIS 467 — Shi'ism: The History of Messianism and the Pursuit of Justice in Islamdom
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The course will introduce students to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. Due to its minority status, Shi'ism has been marginalized in the teaching and the writing of Islamic history. We remain the captives of a master narrative that portrayed the rise of Islam through the eyes of the Abbasid Caliphs, patrons of Sunnism who dominated the medieval Islamic world. Followers of Ali, however, have produced different narratives of early Islam and we will explore these conflicting memories to rethink Islamic history and to see the ways in which Shi'ism was constructed as the Other by mainstream Muslims (Sunnis).

We will look at storytelling and drama as ritual performances commemorating an Alid past — as experiences of suffering that tied together a community of devotees of Ali, sustaining the livelihood of Shi'ism. We will end with the modern period, as we focus on how ritual and memory were transformed into sites of resistance that politicize Shi'is in Iran and Iraq.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

AAPTIS 468 — Islamic Law
Section 001, LEC
Islamic Law

Instructor: Jackson,Sherman A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students to classical Islamic legal theory and some applications of positive law in the Sunni tradition. After a brief review of the seminal controversies that defined the "formative period," and the development of Islamic legal theory, we will examine the interpretive modus operandi of the full-blown schools of law in the "post-formative" era. This will include an examination of such key issues as ijtihad versus taqlid, the madhhab (or school of law), the legal responsum (fatwa), legal ecclecticism, and the issue of legal change, stasis and borrowing. This will be carried out via a general overview of a number of areas of positive law, e.g., marriage, divorce, abortion, child custody and legal procedure. The course will conclude with a look at developments in Islamic legal thinking in modern times, including an examination of some legal responsa (in translation) to some important modern controversies and a few samples of jurisprudential writings of Muslim scholars in the East and West. All required readings will be in English.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 262

AAPTIS 474 — An Introduction to Modern Armenian Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bardakjian,Kevork B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

In the period under discussion (16th-20th Centuries), Armenian literature flourished mostly in the Armenian dispersion. Alongside traditional literature in Classical Armenian, there had long emerged a new, secular literary trend, expressed in Middle Armenian. Responding to a growing national awareness, Armenian writers in the 19th century revised some of the principal elements of Armenian identity and placed a greater emphasis on its political aspects. Such trends and many innovative ones continued into the 20th century, but the Genocide of 1915 brought Western Armenian literature to an abrupt end. This tradition survived in the post-Genocide dispersion, at the same time as a new literature began to emerge in Soviet Armenia. This course will focus on a wide range of issues that reshaped Armenian letters in the modern period: from recovered and fresh ideas, renewed awareness and genres throughout the 16th-18th centuries, to the clash, in subsequent centuries, of old and new values; identity, legitimacy and continuity; nationalism, nationhood, and literary reactions to violence; and cultural, aesthetic and social concerns, all against a historical background.

AAPTIS 488 — History of Arabic Literature in English
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The texts for this course will be materials in English translation. Introductory lectures will briefly describe the essential features of the Arabic language and the cultural and geographic area to which it gives expression. Readings and discussions will progress in chronological order from pre-Islamic to modern times. The odes of the poets of pre-Islamic Arabia and their roles in their society will be discussed. The fables of Bidpai, translated from Persian by Ibn al-Muqaffa as the moralistic and didactic tales of Kalila and Dimna, will be seen to mark the introduction of prose in Arabic. The Qur'an and the biographical literature relating to the life and personality of the Prophet Muhammad will be examined in detail.

Excerpts from both the poetry and the prose of the classical period, including reference to the early Arab geographers and scientists, will illustrate the intellectual vitality and values of Arab-Islamic civilization. The Arabian Nights, although introduced into popular Arabic culture towards the end of the Baghdad caliphate from eastern origins, will be seen to exemplify many aspects of Arabic culture over extended periods of time and diversity of location. The contact and clash between Arab and Western cultures since the early 19th century will be seen to have given rise to new forms of literary expression in contemporary Arabic literature.

Regular class attendance and participation in discussions. Presentations of essays to the class. Six essays will be required. These will give evidence of close readings of the assigned texts and the use of supplementary materials.

AAPTIS 491 — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Modern Islamic Movements

Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the rise and evolution of Islamic political movements in different areas of the Muslim world. After a brief introduction to Islam as a religious, cultural, and political tradition, the course will focus the phenomenon of so-called political Islam and political movements associated with it. The course will address their historical roots and ideological underpinnings. While the ideological premises shared by most Islamic movements are important, the course will also highlight the distinctive political and social strategies and agendas deployed by the participants in such movements in different regions. Special consideration will be given to the role of the political and social environments in which modern Islamic movements rise and evolve and which give them their distinct character. In addition to readings, course materials include recent films, lectures by guest speakers with expertise in different regional manifestations of political Islam, and a visit to an Islamic center in the Detroit Metro area.

Prerequisites: Students are expected to have a modicum of knowledge of Middle Eastern, Russian/Soviet and South Asian history and of Islamic religion.

Format: The coordinator of the course will lead discussions of reading assignments and moderate guest-speaker presentations in a seminar-like format.

AAPTIS 491 — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 002, LEC
Russia and its 'Easts'

Instructor: Northrop,Douglas Taylor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This topical seminar explores an important theme in tsarist Russian and Soviet history. The focus is on issues of race, ethnicity, and nationality — on the macro level of state politics, discourse, and economic, social, and cultural policy as well as on the micro level of lived social experience and personal identity. Students will work extensively with a wide variety of primary documents (in translation) and will use the lens of Soviet history to consider general technical and conceptual problems of historical analysis. Topics to be addressed include: the nature of "nationhood"; continuities and the lack thereof in tsarist and Soviet policies towards non-Russian groups; historiographical debates over the character of such policies; distinctions among non-Russian groups; the problem of studying groups without "voices" of their own; the role of ethnicity and nationality in the disintegration of the USSR; and the role of Russian nationalism.

AAPTIS 493 — Comparative Perspectives of the Middle East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC
Middle East Minorities. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The aim of this course is to expose students to various UM faculty and outside experts on a particular theme. It is taught from a comparative perspective to introduce students to a range of historical periods, geographical areas, and methods for future study and research.

AAPTIS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 502 — Advanced Arabic Readings in Special Subjects
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Rammuny,Raji M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is open for advanced students who plan to use Arabic for academic and research purposes. It follows content-based, learner-centered methodology. Students select the topics in which they are interested, read 15-20 pages every week before class, and then prepare written summary reports to be presented in class followed by discussion. This course aims to develop analytical study skills, including critical reading and listening, as well as effective writing and oral presentation. Grades will be based on weekly written reports, class attendance and participation, a final group project, and an oral interview. Special features: Course taught entirely in Arabic, occasional lectures delivered by guest speakers.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 501 or equivalent. Taught in Arabic.

AAPTIS 512 — Classical Arabic II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Romanov,Maxim
Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

WN 2007
Credits: 5

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are in enrolled in AAPTIS 102, 112, or 482.

A continuation of the acquisition of basic vocabulary and fundamental grammar. There is increased focus on the development of reading ability as well as cultural insights through short selections from the Qur'an and Medieval Islamic literature. This course also provides training in the use of Arabic-English dictionary.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 481.

AAPTIS 551 — Readings in Ottoman Turkish
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Hagen,Gottfried J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this class for advanced students of Ottoman Turkish, we will study 17th-century discourses of religion, history, politics, and autobiography, practicing our language skills on printed and manuscript texts. In the interpretive work we will be looking for manifestations of modernity and try to establish similarities and differences to European developments in that period.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 252 and 452 or equivalent. Knowledge of Turkish language necessary.

AAPTIS 561 — Modern Arabic Fiction
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Legassick,Trevor; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Selected examples of contemporary imaginative prose writing, such as short and long fiction and drama, will be studied. Readings will be in Arabic, and class discussions will be in English.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 403 or reading knowledge of Arabic.

AAPTIS 568 — Classical Arabic Poetry
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Knysh,Alexander D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine of the evolution of classical Arabic poetry and belles-lettres from their inception in pre-Islamic Arabia through their blossoming in the "golden age" of Islamic culture (ninth-tenth centuries) and until the dawning of the modern epoch. Unlike the previous re-incarnations of this course, the focus will be on the poetry and belles-lettres from post-classical epoch, including texts composed in the vernacular. Presentations and discussions will be conducted in both Arabic and English. Some basic background information about the texts and authors will be provided in order to place them in a meaningful historical and cultural context. Grading will be based on reading and translation performance, presentations, and mid-term and final examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 403 or equivalent.

AAPTIS 569 — Modern Arabic Poetry
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Shammas,Anton; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will introduce students of modern Arabic literature to the sheer pleasure of reading and discussing a poem in the original language. Having established the historical and aesthetic context for the emergence and development of modern Arabic poetry, we will closely read and analyze selected poems written throughout the century, representing different schools and trends: neoclassicism, romanticism, symbolism, free-verse, prose-poetry, and modernism. The list will include poets such as: Ahmad Shawqi, Khalil Mutran, Joubran, Bishara Al-Khoury, Said Aql, Nazik Al-Malaikah, Al-Sayyab, Qabbani, Adonis, Darwish, and other, less known poets. We will pay special attention to women poets of the past decade.

The selected texts will be assigned for reading and analysis, both at the individual and the group level. At the individual level, each student will be asked to focus on a specific poem of her/his choice, and present it in class. A term paper, written in Arabic, is due at the end of the term. Intended for Graduate and advanced undergraduates in NES or CMENAS, who are fluent in Arabic, and have completed AAPTIS 502 or equivalent. Seminar format.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 502; Fluency in Arabic at the advanced level

AAPTIS 583 — Medieval Arabic Historical, Biographical, and Geographical Texts
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Bonner,Michael David; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Each time this course is given, it is devoted to either historical, biographical or geographical texts, in Arabic, from the rise of Islam through the Mamluk period (roughly 600-1500). We read some modern studies in English, but most of our efforts go toward engaging the Arabic texts and acquiring navigational skills.

In addition to the general assignments, students make presentations based on their own readings and research. At the end of term they write up their results in a research paper.

This time we turn to the environment of the court during the Buyid period in Iraq and western Iran (the 4th/10th and 5th/11th centuries). We concentrate on two monumental works, the Kitab al-aghani or Book of Songs of Abu' l-Faraj al-Isfahani, and the Kitab Al-Imta' wa'-mu'anasa or Book of Enjoyment and Conviviality of Abu Hayyan al-Tawhidi.

AAPTIS 583 can provide an introduction to classical Arabic for advanced students of Modern Standard Arabic.

Advisory Prerequisite: AAPTIS 404.

AAPTIS 584 — Persianate History Through Political and Cultural Texts
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Babayan,Kathryn; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The object of the course is to familiarize students of Iranian and Turkic history with a variety of genres of writings emanating from their shared Persianate cultural spheres. Geographically, it shall scrutinize 'texts' from Anatolia, Iraq, Iran, Central Asia and India, those very lands in which Persian became the hegemonic language of politics and literature in the medieval and early modern ages (11-17th centuries). It analyses mediums through which the Persian language became the vehicle for continuity of Pre-Islamic Indo-Iranian conceptions of history, cosmos, kingship, spirituality, and social stratification. The choice demonstrates how the Islamic synthesis between Arab, Persian, and Turko-Mongol traditions are objectified in these particular genres. The following genres shall be studied: court chronicles, 'Mirrors of princes,' biographies of poets, hagiographies, local histories, religious poetry, disputations and epics, chancellery documents, such as land grants, firmans and diplomatic correspondence. Some readings shall be from manuscripts to introduce the student to paleography. Secondary scholarship will be assigned to place the texts within their wider historical contexts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced reading knowledge of Persian.

AAPTIS 591 — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC
The Writing of Post-Soviet History: The Case of the Caucasus and Armenia.

Instructor: Libaridian,Gerard J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The seminar will explore the historical and, more broadly, social science literature that has been produced in the last decade to narrate the story of ex-Soviet states, including the processes of state and nation formation, with special focus on the three republics of the south Caucasus. Particular attention will be paid to the issues raised and approaches adopted by Western scholars. The seminar will counterpoise, in particular, the conflict between a geo-strategic perspective and the logic of local and regional dynamics.

AAPTIS 592 — Seminar in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Constructions of Collective Memory and Identity: Readings in Theory and Practice

Instructor: Bardenstein,Carol B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this graduate seminar, we examine a selection of theoretical works on the construction of collective memory, cultural memory, and collective identification and affiliation. While some of our focus will be on the collective configurations associated with the "nation" and nationalism, and those interrogating and subverting them, considerable emphasis will be placed on modes of collective memory and identity formation other than the national, including those emerging in contexts of collective displacement, dispersion/diaspora, exile, trauma, catastrophe, as well as hybridization, minority configurations, second generation and "post-memory" formation, collective memory formations around food, music, landscape, etc. The seminar will also examine how memoirs have articulated and shaped collective memory construction. Against the backdrop of the body of theoretical literature on this topic, (Halbwachs, Nora, Casey, Lowenthal, Assman, Kirmayer, Hirsch, Huyssen and others) we will read a selection of primary works (literary, filmic, popular cultural) and secondary works that articulate and analyze collective memory and identity in very specific historical and cultural contexts. Approximately half of the particular examples analyzed will focus on the context of the Palestinian-Israeli conflict (Palestinian and Israeli/Zionist/Jewish), as well as a selection of other Middle Eastern, Mediterranean and Jewish collective contexts. The other half will be drawn from the specific research interests of the students in the seminar (based on texts selected from their area of research in consultation with instructor).

AAPTIS 593 — Mini Course — Topics in Arabic, Armenian, Persian, Turkish, and Islamic Studies
Section 001, LEC
Demons, Pantheons, Golden Ages: The Case of Turkish Nationalism. Meets 1/22-2/14. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 29).

Instructor: Berktay,Halil

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

The complex transition from 19th-century varieties of Ottoman identity or Muslim patriotism to Turkish nationalism in the throes of the protracted crisis of 1908-22. The search for a viable past : contemporary traumas vs mytho-historical ways of compensation. Alternative golden ages, projected affinities, and corresponding value systems. Early textbooks; popular history; the invention of Central Asian origins; questions of race; Yusuf Akçura's and Fuat Köprü lü 's weaving of an evolutionary grand narrative; grafting a national discourse onto an Ottoman-centered imperial discourse; early Kemalism's redefinition of Turkish nationalism. Literary sources : Ömer Seyfeddin, Mehmed Akif, Naz?m Hikmet, Yahya Kemal. The objectives and constraints of the Turkish Thesis of History.

This course will be taught by Halil Berktay, Associate Professor of History, and also Program Coordinator for both History and Turkish Studies, at Sabanci University (Istanbul, Turkey). BA-MA Economics (Yale '68); PhD History (Birmingham, UK '91).

AAPTIS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Permission of instructor.

AAPTIS 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

AAPTIS 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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