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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ACABS
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 23 of 23
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ACABS 102 — Elementary Classical Hebrew II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Bos,James M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

ACABS 102 is a continuation of ACABS 101 with an increased emphasis on the Classical Hebrew verbal system and syntax as presented in Seow's A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew. Additionally, students will be introduced to select readings from the Hebrew Bible/Old Testament.

Final grades will be based upon daily class performance, homework assignments, quizzes and a final exam. The required textbooks are Seow's A Grammar for Biblical Hebrew and Biblia Hebraica Stuttgartensia.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 101.

ACABS 122 — Introduction to the New Testament
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Although it has influenced the Western world more than any other book, the New Testament — having originated almost 2,000 years ago in the eastern Mediterranean world — is not easy to understand. This course will, first of all, introduce the student to the historical, religious, and social setting of the New Testament. Then, we shall look at the various New Testament writings. They must be allowed to speak for themselves and not be clouded by any denominational or sectarian program. The student will be introduced to the insights and methods of modern scholarship when dealing with questions such as: What did the various New Testament writings really intend to say? How did they say it? Why did they say it? Finally, the problem of the development of early Christian doctrine will be addressed, albeit briefly. Why were some of the early Christian writings excluded from the New Testament canon? There will be two midterms and a final exam.

ACABS 202 — Intermediate Classical Hebrew, II
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Schmidt,Brian B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Lang Req

As a continuation of ACABS 201, the students will be introduced to additional elements of Biblical Hebrew syntax and other aspects of advanced grammar. Further selected Biblical texts will be read, and their historical and literary backgrounds analyzed and discussed. Grade: attendance, participation, examinations and daily assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 201.

ACABS 270 — Introduction to Rabbinic Literature
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 470/JUDAIC 470 or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

In this course, we will explore the history and substance of rabbinic writing on three levels. First, we will talk about the rabbinic literary enterprise within the broad cultural, historical and religious context of the Roman and Byzantine eras. Second, we will examine the many genres of rabbinic literature and literature and consider the sages — the elite group of Jewish intellectuals who created this corpus. Finally, we will trace the way in which subsequent generations have gradually shaped these texts to their current format and endowed them with their exalted status. The course will combine lectures and reading sessions of rabbinic texts (all material will be provided in English translation). Grades will be based on participation, a short and long paper, midterm, and a final.

ACABS 308 — The Acts of the Apostles
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gagos,Traianos

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Students electing this course should have completed at least one year of Attic Greek. To the degree that there is mastery of the paradigm forms and the principal parts of the most common irregular verbs the reading assignments will be made easier and more enjoyable. Careful attention will be paid to the key features of Koiné Greek, especially as those features part company from Attic Greek morphology and syntax. One midterm exam, a two-hour final, and regular participation in class will determine the course grade; there are no papers. In-class translation is followed by a discussion of the text.

Advisory Prerequisite: GREEK 101 and 102; and permission of instructor.

ACABS 395 — Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies: Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor

ACABS 470 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270 or JUDAIC 270, or HJCS 570/ACABS 570/JUDAIC 570.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: HJCS 202.

ACABS 484 — Aramaic, II
Section 001, REC
Syriac

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course offers an introduction to the study of Syriac, a dialect of Aramaic, specifically that of the ancient city of Edessa (a.k.a. Urhai; modern Urfa), which became a common language for Christian communities in the east. Because it was used by many writers, Syriac is perhaps the best attested ancient Aramaic dialect; study of it allows greater insight into Aramaic as a language and into Aramaic's other manifestations in both the east and west. Due to its association with eastern Christianity, it might seem obvious that Syriac texts preserve much information concerning the early history of this religion. It might be less obvious, however, that Syriac texts also preserve accounts of important historic events, much poetry, magical literature, humorous tales, and scientific writing. In short, an ability to read Syriac will be an asset to those interested in understanding the thought-world of the Middle East during and after Late Antiquity.

We will use, as our textbook, the 5th edition of Theodore H. Robinson's Paradigms and Exercises in Syriac Grammar (Oxford: Oxford University, 2003). Other material will be covered by handouts distributed once classes begin.

Student evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, performance on quizzes, a mid-term, and a final exam. Students need not have any acquaintance with any Semitic language to take the course; all are welcome. Feel free to ask questions. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 483.

ACABS 491 — Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 001, LEC
Slaying the Dragon, Illuminating the Soul: Ancient Semitic Poetry from the Middle East in English Translation

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will explore the variety of ancient poems from the Middle East, which, while outside the Bible, provide the most immediate context for the imagery, metaphors, and poetic vocabulary from the Bible. Thus, a study of this ancient poetry not only offers us access to the thought-world of the ancient Middle East, but it also informs our understanding and reading of biblical books like Psalms, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job.

The corpus of texts to be studied includes the Canaanite mythic/epic/magic texts from the ancient city of Ugarit at one extreme and the poems from the Dead Sea Scrolls, from early Judaism and early Christianity at the other. The texts are read in order to explore their literary characteristics, how these literary characteristics reflect the themes and ideas of the works they are incorporated within, and the literary parallels to other works, including the Bible and other Ancient Near Eastern texts.

In addition to these aspects of the poems themselves, the course will explore the manner in which we read and analyze poems, specifically how scholars have described ancient Semitic poetry and how their methodologies and approaches can be applied to the texts we will be reading.

Each class will include a lecture followed by a discussion of pertinent poems and passages. Students are given a series of specific questions that they are to think about concerning specific poems/passages and are responsible for having something prepared for class to say in response to the questions.

Graduate students who enroll and have experience reading Ugaritic or biblical Hebrew will be responsible for reading the poems (or portions of them) in the original languages, and/or reading additional secondary material. HOWEVER, THERE ARE NO LANGUAGE PREREQUISITES FOR THE COURSE. No prior knowledge of Ugaritic or Hebrew is required.

Student evaluation will be made based on class attendance/participation, on regular readings, on a midterm, a final, and a short paper.

We will use, as our textbooks, the following translations Ugaritic Narrative Poetry (ed. Simon B. Parker; Writings from the Ancient World Series 9; N.P.: Society of Biblical Literature/Scholars Press, 1997) and Geza Vermes's The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English (New York: Penguin, 2004). Students should also have access to a Bible, specifically a NRSV or JPS translation. Other material will be covered by handouts distributed once classes begin.

Feel free to ask questions. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

ACABS 498 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

The Senior Honors thesis is for students who have been approved by the Near Eastern Studies concentration advisor, Honors advisor, and the LS&A Honors Council. The length of the thesis may vary, but 50-60 pages is common. Two advisors should be chosen. The principal advisor is a member of the faculty in whose field of expertise the thesis topic lies, and he or she oversees the student's research and the direction taken by the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ACABS 570 — Reading the Rabbis
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Eliav,Yaron Z

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HJCS 270/JUDAIC 270 or HJCS 470/ACABS 470.

This course is designed as a graduate level introduction to rabbinic literature, a multifaceted corpus produced by Jewish scholars (known in English as Rabbis) from the 1st to the 7th century CE. It provides the necessary information for contextualizing the rabbinic project historical, social, cultural, and religious backgrounds as well as mapping of the various genres represented in this literature. In addition it offers a first hand encounter with the texts in their original language as well as introduction to the most important scholarly trends in the field. As such, the course is geared toward advanced students of Judaism who wish to gain basic knowledge of the rabbis and their literary endeavor as well as those interested in any aspect of Greco-Roman or Byzantine civilization and wish to work with rabbinic material. Students will attend all meetings of Intro. to Rabbinic Literature (HJCS 270; Judaic 270). In addition, the seminar will meet for another 2 hour session per week, during which we will engage in an in-depth study of rabbinic sugyot in the original language and discuss modern scholarship and theory on rabbinic literature. Second year proficiency in Hebrew is required as well as an introductory level course in Aramaic.

Advisory Prerequisite: Second year proficiency in Hebrew (HJCS 202).

ACABS 587 — Seminar in Ancient Egyptian History and Culture: Selected Topics
Section 001, SEM
Ancient Egypt in the Later Periods (c. 1070 BCE-642 CE)

Instructor: Wilfong,Terry G

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Ancient Egypt in the later periods (c. 1070 BCE-642 CE) has historically been neglected by scholars in favor of the New Kingdom and earlier periods. But these later periods of Egyptian history are of great interest for the historian: Egypt's changing relationships with its neighbors, its adaptations to increasinly long periods of foreign rule and the resiliency and persistence of its indigenous culture are important aspects of this time. Students will explore recent scholarship on Egypt in the later periods, examine the period as a whole and do concentrated research on a specific period within the course's larger timeframe. Grades will be based on midterm exam, oral presentation, and research paper.

Enforced Prerequisites: ACABS 281 or ACABS 382/HISTART 382/ANTHRARC 381

ACABS 591 — Topics in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 001, SEM
Slaying the Dragon, Illuminating the Soul: Ancient Semitic Poetry from the Middle East in English Translation

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will explore the variety of ancient poems from the Middle East, which, while outside the Bible, provide the most immediate context for the imagery, metaphors, and poetic vocabulary from the Bible. Thus, a study of this ancient poetry not only offers us access to the thought-world of the ancient Middle East, but it also informs our understanding and reading of biblical books like Psalms, Isaiah, Ezekiel, and Job.

The corpus of texts to be studied includes the Canaanite mythic/epic/magic texts from the ancient city of Ugarit at one extreme and the poems from the Dead Sea Scrolls, from early Judaism and early Christianity at the other. The texts are read in order to explore their literary characteristics, how these literary characteristics reflect the themes and ideas of the works they are incorporated within, and the literary parallels to other works, including the Bible and other Ancient Near Eastern texts.

In addition to these aspects of the poems themselves, the course will explore the manner in which we read and analyze poems, specifically how scholars have described ancient Semitic poetry and how their methodologies and approaches can be applied to the texts we will be reading.

Each class will include a lecture followed by a discussion of pertinent poems and passages. Students are given a series of specific questions that they are to think about concerning specific poems/passages and are responsible for having something prepared for class to say in response to the questions.

Graduate students who enroll and have experience reading Ugaritic or biblical Hebrew will be responsible for reading the poems (or portions of them) in the original languages, and/or reading additional secondary material. HOWEVER, THERE ARE NO LANGUAGE PREREQUISITES FOR THE COURSE. No prior knowledge of Ugaritic or Hebrew is required.

Student evaluation will be made based on class attendance/participation, on regular readings, on a midterm, a final, and a short paper.

We will use, as our textbooks, the following translations Ugaritic Narrative Poetry (ed. Simon B. Parker; Writings from the Ancient World Series 9; N.P.: Society of Biblical Literature/Scholars Press, 1997) and Geza Vermes's The Complete Dead Sea Scrolls in English (New York: Penguin, 2004). Students should also have access to a Bible, specifically a NRSV or JPS translation. Other material will be covered by handouts distributed once classes begin.

Feel free to ask questions. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

ACABS 592 — Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 001, SEM
Enoch and the Mosaic Torah — The Evidence of the Book of Jubilees

Instructor: Boccaccini,Gabriele; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Book of Jubilees is one of the most important documents for understanding the development of Jewish thought in the Second Temple period. In the aftermath of the Maccabean revolt, Enochic and Mosaic traditions were merged into a powerful synthesis that many scholars believe laid the foundation for the emergence of the Essene movement and the community of Qumran. After reconstructing the main stages in the history of research and discussing the complex textual structure, this seminar will focus on the theology of the document, its location within Second Temple Judaism, and its relevance for Qumran and Christian Origins. Issues such as the origin of evil, calendar, purity, gender, eschatology, ritual, etc. will be explored, eventually addressing the central questions: Is Jubilees a "Mosaic" or "Enochic" text? Is it correct to label it as the first "Essene" document? Some of the material produced by the students (i.e. the annotated bibliography) will be offered in the Summer at an international Conference on Jubilees (the Fourth Enoch Seminar, July 2008) and may be published in the Proceedings.
Undergraduate students need the instructor's permission to enroll.

ACABS 592 — Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 002, SEM
Advanced Syriac

Instructor: Reymond,Eric Daniel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will focus on reading texts written in Syriac, the dialect of Aramaic that was the common language for many scholars, historians, theologians, and poets writing in Syria and in eastern realms during Late Antiquity and later.

Texts to be read in class will be in the form of handouts. Student evaluation will be based on attendance, class participation, and performance on a midterm and a final exam. The prerequisite for this course is ACABS 483, or an equivalent course. Questions are welcome. Email me at ereymond@umich.edu.

ACABS 592 — Seminar in Ancient Civilizations and Biblical Studies
Section 003, SEM
The Literature and Mythology of Ancient Mesopotamia

Instructor: Michalowski,Piotr A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The first known literature in the world was created almost five thousand years ago in southern Mesopotamia, in the area occupied by the modern state of Iraq. These myths, hymns, epics, proverbs, omens, spells, as well as many other kinds of texts were written on clay tablets using the cuneiform script. The poems were composed in various languages, primarily in Sumerian and Akkadian (Babylonian), but we will be reading these texts in modern English translations. Those who know the ancient languages will be expected to use them, for others no knowledge of the ancient languages will be required.

Cuneiform was invented around 3200 BC and was used widely until the first centuries of the modern era. Archaeologists and plunderers have unearthed hundreds of thousands of inscribed clay tablets providing us with a fairly complete picture of this long-lived literature of ancient Sumer, Assyria, and Babylonia. We will be reading the most important of these texts and using them as a means of understanding the worldview of a long lost ancient society. The pleasure of reading will therefore also serve as a pretext for a meditation on cross-cultural communication across time and space, as we try to respect difference but at the same time seek common ground with different people from different civilizations. Please note that this is primarily an advanced, graduate level seminar. Permission of instructor is required.

Format: lecture/seminar

Requirements: attendance (absolutely required), participation in discussions, and a research paper.

Required Books:

  • Benjamin R. Foster, Before the Muses: An Anthology of Akkadian Literature, (CDL Press, 2005);
  • Jeremy Black and Anthony Green, Gods, Demons and Symbols of Ancient Mesopotamia: An Illustrated Dictionary, (Texas University Press, 1992);
  • Andrew George, The Epic of Gilgamesh: The Babylonian Epic Poem and Other Texts in Akkadian and Sumerian, (Penguin, 2000)

Students will be expected to make use of other materials from the library; some will be made available during the course through CourseTools.

ACABS 602 — Advanced Readings in Classical Hebrew
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Schmidt,Brian B; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

As a continuation of ACABS 601, the students will be introduced to additional elements of Biblical Hebrew syntax and other aspects of advanced grammar. Further selected Biblical texts will be read, and their historical and literary backgrounds analyzed and discussed. Grade: attendance, participation, examinations, daily assignments, and a term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 601. Graduate standing.

ACABS 611 — Akkadian Documents
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Beckman,Gary M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This term we will read Akkadian-language economic and administrative records from the Old Babylonian period. Evaluation: Grading will be based on in-class recitation and a term paper (5000 words minimum). Text(book)s: Materials will be provided by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 412 or equivalent.

ACABS 615 — Sumerian Readings
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Michalowski,Piotr A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We will be reading a variety of Sumerian literary compositions in the original language.

Grading will be based on weekly class performance. No texts are required. Method of instruction: lecture, discussion, class readings. No books are required.

Advisory Prerequisite: ACABS 512. Graduate standing.

ACABS 618 — Hittite Readings
Section 001, REC

Instructor: Beckman,Gary M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: ACABS 415 or basic knowledge of Hittite and cuneiform script.

Study of Hittite texts in their original cuneiform manuscripts, with intensive review of grammar. Attention is paid to the development of epigraphic skills. Each term, the focus is on a different genre.

Advisory Prerequisite: NES,ACABS 415 or basic knowledge of Hittite and cuneiform script.

ACABS 798 — Directed Graduate Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ACABS 990 — Dissertation Research Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral candidate not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ACABS 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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