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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ANTHRARC
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 12 of 12
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRARC 258 — Honors Seminar in Anthropological Archaeology
Section 001, SEM
Madagascar: Nature and Culture

Instructor: Wright,Henry T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Madagascar, an isolated mini-continent in the Indian Ocean, has been viewed by scholars as a laboratory for the study of the diversification of both biological species and cultures. Understandably, many Malagasy — the inhabitants of Madagascar — resent this characterization of themselves as objects. Their ancestors first settled on the shores of Madagascar before AD 500, and have elaborated a unique synthesis of Indonesian, South Asian, Near Eastern and African elements which needs to be understood appreciated in its own terms.

The seminar will cover begin with an introduction to Madagascar today, its diverse environments, ethnic groups, dialects, music, religions, and recent history. Then we will enter the world of 180 million years ago, introducing the geology, climate, and unusual biology of this isolated land mass. We will then turn to the work of paleo-ecologists and archaeologists on the problem of Madagascar's initial colonization by people and the spread of human populations in the great island's many environments. The seminar members will then consider the economic and political development, and political ideologies of each of Madagascar's regions. Finally, seminar member's will turn to Madagascar's colonization by the French, the sanguinary uprising of 1947, independence, and the political and social developments. No special background is assumed, though for many possible seminar projects the ability to read French is helpful. . There is one session per week. There is no required textbook but some participants may want to acquire The NATURAL HISTORY of MADAGASCAR, Ed. By Steven Goodman and Jonathan Benstead (University of Chicago Press Paperback @ $50). There will be frequent in-class handouts, and an electronic course pack. Successful completion of the course requires one presentation to the seminar, and one research paper in the one of the participant's areas of interest

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors

ANTHRARC 285 — Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology
Section 001, LEC
Issues in Race & Ethnicity

Instructor: Young,Lisa C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: RE, SS

Frauds and Fantastic Claims in Archaeology examines interpretations of archaeological remains popular in the media but that archaeologists view as fringe or "pseudoscientific" ideas. We focus particularly on claims that cultural achievements by indigenous peoples are a consequence of contact with superior beings, such as "more advanced" civilizations and even extra-terrestrials. We will examine the logical flaws and problematic evidence used to support these claims, along with the racist assumptions that underlie them. The goal of this course is for students to learn critical thinking skills that will enable them to assess popular interpretations of archaeological remains in the future. The course format is lecture and discussion sections. Evaluations are based on section exercises, participation, and two exams. The textbook is Kenneth L. Feder's Frauds, Myths, and Mysteries (5th edition). Students will also read websites and articles available on ctools to supplement the text.

ANTHRARC 386 — Early Civilizations
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wright,Henry T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR, SS

The earliest civilizations in both Eastern and Western hemispheres are the focus of this course. The civilizations of most ancient Mesopotamia, Egypt, Mexico, and Peru will be points of emphasis. The course begins with brief discussions of the work of archaeologists, of the evolution of complex societies, of the spread of human populations in the planet's many environments, and the beginnings of our agricultural systems. We then consider the geography, economic and political development, and ideologies of each early civilization, based on archaeology and the evidence of the earliest written texts. No special background is assumed. There are two lectures and one discussion section per week. The textbook is IMAGES of the PAST by Gary Feinman and T.D. Price, McGraw-Hill, For those with further interests PATTERNS in PREHISTORY by Robert Wenke and Deborah Olszewski, Oxford University Press, may be of interest. There will be electronic resources and in-class handouts. There will be In-Class Midterm and Final Exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRARC 482 — Topics in Anthropological Archaeology
Section 001, LEC
Archaeological Geology

Instructor: Pares,Josep M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Archaeological Geology has the ultimate objective of gathering and interpreting relevant geological data to aid in archaeological interpretation. Specifically, the objectives of archaeological geology are documenting site stratigraphy, determining site formation and reconstructing both the landscape and how people interacted with the land. It encompasses the entire spectrum of techniques and concepts of the geosciences that can be applied to archaeological research. This includes contributions from stratigraphy, sedimentology, pedology, chronostratigraphy, petrology, geomorphology, neotectonics, geophysics and geochemistry. Method of instruction includes lectures and discussions in class. Requirements include two exams, topic presentation and paper discussions in class, one paper, and class participation. No text book required, we will recommend few and class notes will be provided as well.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 495 — Ethnography, Archaeology, Origin and Evolution of Pastoralism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Redding,Richard William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Pastoralism is the practice by humans of herding domestic animals. It is a human subsistence strategy that is widespread and exhibits broad variation. Pastoralism occurs on all continents except Antarctica. It appeared with the domestication of sheep and goats (circa 8000 BC) and is an integral part of modern regional economies. It varies in scale, degree of mobility and in focal taxa. The scale of pastoralism runs from household based to industrial scale. It may be sedentary, mobile, or nomadic. The taxa utilized cover many of the families of the large herbivores. This course focuses on the ethnography, archaeology, origin and evolution of pastoralism. Specific questions addressed are: How does one identify pastoralism archaeologically? What happens when animals are equated with wealth? How does pastoralism vary as the degree of human dependence on animals changes?

Intended audience: Anthropology, archaeology, and history concentrators, as well as interested undergraduates and graduate students.

Course Requirements: Participation in class discussions, an in-class presentation, a paper and a final exam.

Class Format: Two one and a half hour meetings per week in seminar format.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRARC 282, ANTHRCUL 101, or permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 499 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 582 — Archaeology II
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wright,Henry T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This is a course designed to provide graduate students with an overview of anthropological research on the development of agriculture and village life, the rise of differentiated societies, the origins of states and the alternation of developed state networks and imperial polities, We cannot cover everything in 14 weeks, so I pick various exemplary areas based on my own experience and my understanding of your interests. In principal, at the end of the course, you will be well prepared to understand research by your future colleagues in various anthropological traditions far from your own, and to teach general anthropology courses which have an archaeological component. There will be Take-home Midterm and Final Essays. I expect to re-design the course to meet peoples' needs and interests.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 683 — Topics in Archaeology
Section 001, SEM
Principles of Social Evolution

Instructor: Marcus,Joyce; homepage
Instructor: Flannery,Kent V

WN 2007
Credits: 3

How did humans make it from egalitarian hunter-gatherers to stratified societies with royals, nobles, commoners, and slaves? Can archaeologists figure out how it happened? Only by reading all the classic ethnographies the postmodernists have banned, and figuring out what archaeological traces those societies would leave. If you believe in a past that is more than a "text," and is knowable through science, join us.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing only

ANTHRARC 958 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 959 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and 18 hours of Anthropology; permission of instructor.

ANTHRARC 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8
Other: INDEPENDENT

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ANTHRARC 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate school authorization for admission as a doctoral candidate.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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