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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ANTHRBIO
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 19 of 19
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRBIO 161 — Introduction to Biological Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

What is the material basis of evolution? How have humans evolved? Why do humans behave in the manner that they do? This class seeks answers to these enduring questions. The course will be divided into three parts. We will begin by reviewing the theory of evolution and examining how evolution produces adaptations and creates new species. This section will conclude by outlining how evolution has shaped the behavior of our closest living relatives, the nonhuman primates. The second part of the class will be devoted to investigating the human fossil record and tracing the physical and behaviroal evolution of our species. The course will conclude by asking how evolution has affected contemporary human behavior. The emphasis throughout will be on the processess that have shaped human evolution and how these have produced who we are. The class includes three lectures plus one discussion/lab meeting per week. Grades will be based on 3 midterms and GSI evaluation.

ANTHRBIO 361 — Biology, Society, and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Van Arsdale,Adam Paul

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, RE

This course will provide an anthropological perspective on the intersection between human biology and society, past and present, in three topical areas. The first unit will focus on human genetic diversity and the increasing use of genetic information in society. Included in this unit will be discussions of genetic ancestry testing and what genes can and cannot tell us about where we come from. The second unit will examine the topic of "missing links" in human prehistory. This will include missing links in the fossil record, the use of missing links to understand the connection between modern and past populations, and the ethics of studying recent human skeletal material. The final unit will look at the relationship between humans and our environment. What is the human environment, how has our environment changed throughout prehistory, and what changes are occurring today? Carrying through all of the units will be the themes of understanding the relationship between human past and present, human diversity, and the ethical issues surrounding intersections between biology and society. The class will be a reading-based, lecture course. Grades will be based on three exams, several short writing assignments, and participation in discussion sections. The focus of the course will be predominantly biological, but is open to students with varying degrees of scientific and biological familiarity. For further information on the course, feel free to contact Professor Adam Van Arsdale (avanarsd@umich.edu).

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 362 — Problems of Race
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Brace,Charles L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, RE

An analysis of the problems arising from racial classification, migration of peoples, and race mixture. Biological and genetic aspects of race.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 364 — Nutrition and Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frisancho,Andres R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

The purpose of this course is to study nutrition from an evolutionary perspective. Specifically this course will examine:

  1. the evolutionary roots including mammalian evolutionary history, primate origins, fossil evidence from Australopithecine to Homo sapiens;

  2. food procurement through hominid evolution including the archaeological evidence about the evolutionary roots of human diet, the evolution of the digestive system and brain size of non-human and human primates;

  3. food and nutrients which examines the physiology of nutrient utilization from carbohydrates to fats and proteins, vitamins, minerals and electrolytes;

  4. Homo sapien food procurement from hunter-gathering, agriculture, and animal domestication;

  5. food and culture which examines

    • the socio-cultural factors that may have contributed to the practice of cannibalism,
    • the ecological basis for the preference and food taboos in contemporary populations,
    • the biological basis for the variability in the ability to digest milk,
    • accommodation to dietary restriction throughout the life cycle, and
    • the consequence of human endeavor to increase its food supply and decrease energy expenditure on the increased prevalence of obesity that is reaching epidemic proportions throughout the industrialized world.

NOTE: All students are expected to know about the principles on which techniques of assessing body composition and nutritional status are based. Such knowledge will be tested on the exam. One option is to learn these techniques by having one's own body size and composition measured by another student, and to measure another student's body size and composition. Students may also choose the option of measuring the weight and fat percentage of their GSI, if their GSI agrees. Students who do not wish to have their body size and composition measured and/or who do not wish to perform such measurements on others will be excused from the assignment. Those who do not participate in these measurements will lose no points as a result. Instead, such students will be given written exercises addressed at interpreting these anthropometric measurements.

Advisory Prerequisite: Sophomore standing.

ANTHRBIO 371 — Techniques in Biological Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Reqs: BS

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 399 — Honors in Biological Anthropology and Anthropology/Zoology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Seniors who choose to enter the honors program undertake a senior project under the supervision of a member of the faculty. Most often this takes the form of an original paper of greater scope than is possible in an ordinary term paper, and it gives the student experience in conducting and writing up his or her own research. Students who are interested in joining the senior honors program should consult with the departmental honors advisor for biological anthropology. Previous participation in the College Honors Program is not a prerequisite for joining the senior Honors program.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 469 — Topics in Biological Anthropology
Section 001, LEC
Laboratory in Human Osteology

Instructor: Guillot,Denise M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course is an introduction to the human skeleton with an emphasis on the basic biology of normal bone. A functional, biomechanical approach will be taken as the various regions of the skeleton are considered. Practical techniques for interpreting individual characteristics (e.g., age, sex, stature) as well as populational characteristics (ancestry) are covered. This course is designed for archaeologists and biological anthropologists but would be valuable to students interested in medicine, dentistry or the allied health professions. Enrollment is limited to 20 students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 471 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Laboratory training and work in the techniques used in various aspects of research in biological anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

ANTHRBIO 563 — Mechanisms of Human Adaptation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frisancho,Andres R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Short-term and long-term bio-cultural responses of man to environmental stress; human genetics, growth, physiology, and culture. Individual and population variations in response to stress.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior standing.

ANTHRBIO 565 — Evolution of Genus Homo
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Evolution of the genus Homo from H. erectus to modern human populations. Topics include origin and dispersal of Homo erectus, appearance and evolution of early H. sapiens, Neanderthal, and modern humans. Some laboratory work is included.

ANTHRBIO 570 — Biological Anthropology: An Overview
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: MacLatchy,Laura M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This course will provide a survey of current research in biological anthropology. We will adopt evolutionary theory and the scientific method to investigate topics in human evolution and genetics, paleoanthropology, human adaptation and human and primate behavioral ecology. Graduate standing is required. The class will combine lectures by the instructor and discussion by students in a seminar format. There will be weekly writing assignments and a final paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing in Anthropology.

ANTHRBIO 661 — Topics in Biological Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Current Topics in Biological Anthropology

Instructor: Mitani,John C; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

This course is designed for graduate students or undergraduate students who plan to develop either: (a) research paper for publication; (b) research proposal for submission to a funding agency. During the first half of the academic term, students will review current research in human biology with emphasis on methods, techniques of data collection and data analysis. In the second half of the academic term the students present for discussion their specific research or research proposal for discussion with all the class participants.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 665 — Topics in Human Evolution
Section 001, SEM
The tooth, the whole tooth, and nothing but the tooth.

Instructor: Wolpoff,Milford H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

This will be a workshop on dental morphology, growth, wear, and ageing technique that will meet both weekly and independently, as a group

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 670 — History of Biological Anthropology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Brace,Charles L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A survey of the attempts to explain the nature of man as a biological species, with emphasis on the role of political events and national traditions in shaping prevailing interpretations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRBIO 961 — Research Practicum in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 8

This course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 962 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 963 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: 18 hours or Graduate standing; permission of instructor

ANTHRBIO 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ANTHRBIO 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate and permission of instructor.

 
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