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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ANTHRCUL
 
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Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fricke,Thomas E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes and explores the structures of inquiry characteristic of anthropology and surveys the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's overall context, history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts, structures, and intellectual methods that typify the discipline. In doing so, the course lays stress on concrete examples of human cultural and ethnic diversity and the interactions leading to structures of dominance, inequality, and resistance. In order to understand and counter negative assessments of diversity, it stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic world view. It teaches students various ways of learning and thinking about the world's many designs for living in time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; human genetics, evolution and the fossil record; the concept of race; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change, and the emergence of a world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. Two objective exams (multiple choice and true or false questions) cover the two halves of the course. The second exam is given on the last day of class. There is no final exam and no term paper. Section leaders require quizzes and, perhaps a short paper.

ANTHRCUL 101 — Introduction to Anthropology
Section 026, LEC

Instructor: Chivens,Thomas H

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This introductory course exposes students to the field's four subdisciplines (biological, archaeological, cultural, and linguistic anthropology), providing a first glimpse of the field's history, present status, and importance. The principal aim of the course is to help students develop a coherent view of the essential concepts and methods that typify the discipline. It stresses unifying principles that link the subdisciplines and thereby create anthropology's comprehensive, holistic perspective. It introduces students to various ways of learning and thinking about human cultural and biological diversity, across both time and space. It prepares them to integrate and interpret information, to evaluate conflicting claims about human nature and diversity, and to think critically. Topics covered include: the nature of culture; race and ethnicity; human genetics, biological evolution, and the fossil record; primate (monkey and ape) behavior; the emergence of agriculture, ancient cities, and states; language and culture; systems of marriage, kinship, and family organization; sex-gender roles; economics, politics, and religion in global perspective; the cultural dimension of economic development and contemporary social change; and the emergence of the world system. Required readings come from one introductory text and two additional paperbacks. Lectures and discussion-recitation. There will be two multiple choice exams, each covering one half of the course; the second exam will be given on the last day of class. There will also be several quizzes and short writing assignments (no more than ten pages total) due in section.

ANTHRCUL 222 — The Comparative Study of Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces students to cultural anthropology as a historically informed approach to the study of human diversity and social change. Culture is frequently thought to explain why social groups differ from each other or why people act in certain ways. Rather than viewing culture as homogeneous and static, this course explores how culture is continually reproduced and changed by people in the context of social transformations and structural hierarchies. Topics include: race, gender, religion, and human rights. Readings will center on in-depth studies of several communities as well as on ethical controversies. The texts include studies of the following: an indigenous Peruvian village and the use of coca leaves; Afro-Caribbean spiritual practices in Haiti, Cuba, and the U.S.; Amazonian indigenous peoples and human rights; healing beliefs among the Hmong in Laos and the U.S. medical system.

Classes will be organized around the discussion of texts, films, and supplementary materials, and will include student group presentations. Written assignments consist of commentaries, a group presentation, and two papers.

ANTHRCUL 226 — Introduction to Historical Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Stein,Eric A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

One of the principal concerns of cultural anthropology has been to discover, document and interpret differences and similarities across cultures. Historical anthropology similarly looks at differences and similarities in the ways in which people understand the past, use the past and assign different meanings to the past in different societies around the world. While we generally believe that "history" is both an academic discipline and a chronological narrative about important events, those of us who study historical anthropology find that this is not a shared understanding of history throughout the world. People secure memories of the past in different ways: in some societies written sources are most important, for other societies it is the storyteller who guards memories of the past, for other societies tools of remembering are found in the environment, in buildings, and in other material forms. Some societies highly value special guardians of history, others don't.

  • Does this mean that the past is more important to some societies rather than others?
  • Do people actually remember differently or only use different tools to remember?
  • And what is memory anyway?
  • An account that conforms to one's present identity or an accurate assessment of the past?

      This course will address the power of the past, looking at why and how contemporary social demands and political battles are fought on the terrain of history and what we choose to remember and systematically forget about it.

ANTHRCUL 256 — Culture, Adaptation, and Environment
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: SS

This course explores anthropological approaches to human relationships with their environments and resources. We will examine diverse conceptions of culture and nature, and time and space, and the interaction between contemporary global forces, indigenous societies, and their ecosystems. Particular interest for complementary materialist and culturalist analysis of human-environment relationships, through cultural anthropology case studies of hunting and gathering, pastoralism, farming, commerce, colonialism, modernization, and globalisation issues. We will read several short books about different people, places, and environmental problems (E.E. Evans-Pritchard's "The Nuer"; Colin Turnbull's "The Forest People"; Joe Kane's "Savages"...). These books will not only provide case studies, but will also show us the way cultural anthropology has changed over the years, expanding its range of theories, descriptive practices, and audience on matters of culture, adaptation, and environment. There will also be a selection of articles about the ideas and concepts that are relevant for analyzing changing human-environment relationships, emphasizing today's interactions between economic growth, environmental change, and human health.

Frequent film clips and screenings will complement the readings, and assignments/exams will be largely writing, in short answer and essay form.

ANTHRCUL 258 — Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Tales from the City: Narratives and Urban Life

Instructor: Hart,Janet Carol

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Cities, with their complex concentrations of people and capital, foster tales of movement, conflict and social transformation. City stories testify to personal experience, collective history, community organization, and institutional constraint. Who speaks about city life and what do they say? What are some of "the multiple ways in which we use narrative to formulate our ideas and experience of urban life" and "the stories heard and told in a particular town" (Finnegan, 1998)? In this course, we will examine how city life is narrated by a variety of protagonists. Over the past few decades anthropologists such as Kenny and Kertzer, James Holston and Setha Low have presented strong arguments and suggested models for the ethnographic study of cities, with Arjun Appadurai going so far as to claim that cities have trumped nations as the primary sites of belonging and citizenship. Additionally, the city has been a critical backdrop in films, works of fiction, and historical monographs. Taking advantage of a variety of sources, we will train our attention on accounts of lived experiences in Johannesburg, Paris, San Francisco and Lagos, among others. The pioneering work of the Chicago ethnographers at the turn of the 20th century as well as a range of developments in other cities such as Brazilia, New York, Dakar and Detroit will serve as important theoretical touchstones. What kinds of expressions and representations might emerge from our materials, allowing us to gain an understanding of the city, its possibilities and its challenges? In broadly comparative and expressly local terms, the course will explore the city as what one philosopher called a "context of discovery," as we attempt to tease out some of the many significant tropes and realities embedded in urban fables, histories, anthropological accounts, and films. Evaluations will be based on class participation, including a stint leading a discussion with another classmate, weekly response papers, and a final take-home exam.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students with sophomore standing or above

ANTHRCUL 258 — Honors Seminar in Cultural Anthropology
Section 002, SEM
The Left in Latin America in Historical Perspective

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

Over the last decade and a half, emerging social forces have been significantly changing the political landscape in Latin America. Innovative social movements, from the Zapatistas in Mexico to the Piqueteros in Argentina, have redefined the scope and mood of national politics in the region. Ever since the election of Hugo Chávez in Venezuela in 1998, a number of politicians commonly associated with the "left" have been elected presidents in their nations: Luiz Inácio Lula da Silva, in Brazil, Ernesto Kirchner, in Argentina, Tabaré Vázquez in Uruguay, Evo Morales in Bolivia, and Michelle Bachelet in Chile.

Several candidates also linked to the "left" have gained significant support in recent presidential elections in other countries: Ollanta Humala in Peru and Andrés Manuel López Obrador in Mexico. More than half of Latin America's 500 million people are now ruled by presidents who claim to be on the left of the political spectrum.

The proposed Honors seminar is designed to explore the significance of leftist politics in Latin America by tracing a connections between leftist transformations in the past and in the current period. The seminar will examine paradigmatic cases in Latin American politics, such as the 1954 coup in Guatemala against Jacobo Arbenz, the Cuban revolution, the Chilean "road to socialism," and the Chávez "revolution" in Venezuela. These case studies articulate questions about imperialism, nationalism, agrarian reform, gender, labor activism, state structures, political ideologies, natural resources, economic reform, populism, and socialist revolution. To the extent possible, I seek to relate this seminar to the LACS's series, "What's Left in Latin America"? that I have organized as director of LACS.

Enforced Prerequisites: LSA Honors

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors students with sophomore standing or above

ANTHRCUL 260 — Folklore in Anthropological Perspective
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carr,Gerald Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

All societies have dynamic folklore genres: expressive culture such as verbal art, song and dance, festivals and games, culinary traditions, material culture and customary knowledge ("informal learning"). Far from being vanishing arts or "outsider" culture, folklore thrives in public and private spheres, permeating daily life as well as special occasions. The targeted study of these features of culture is known as folkloristics. This course provides a general introduction to the theories, concepts and methodologies of folkloristics in historical perspective, with attention to the intersection of folkloristics and anthropology. We will study the forms and characteristics of folklore, conceived successively as historical artifact, as culture or worldview, and finally as communicative process. Illustrations will come primarily from America's many cultures-Native, regional and popular. Students will learn to analyze their own folklore traditions as well as those of others and apply folklore methods in an original, class research project.

Intended audience:Students interested in Anthropology, American Culture, or English, or any LSA student interested in expressive and popular culture.

Course Requirements:Students will complete approximately seven short writing assignments (through CTools) and one term paper (12-15 pp). The paper will be the culmination of an individual research project documenting and analyzing some local, public sample of folklore practices.

Class Format:Three hours per week in lecture format and one hour per week in discussion section. GSI will run the discussion sections and work with the instructor on grading.

ANTHRCUL 272 — Language in Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, RE

This course offers students an introduction to linguistic anthropology, the study of language in comparative social and cultural context. Some of the questions we will consider in this course include:

  • What is "language," and why do anthropologists study it? How and to what extent does speaking a particular language construct a culturally specific model of the social and natural world, a sense of 'reality'?
  • How do our linguistic perceptions influence the ways we recognize social differences, such as those based on ethnicity, race, class and gender?
  • How do linguistic practices and perceptions of language reinforce social divisions and relationships of unequal power?

In pursuing these questions, we will cover a range of topics related to understanding how linguistic practices contribute to the social construction of racial and ethnic identity, as well as discrimination based on these perceived differences. We will consider how judgments about "grammatical" and "ungrammatical" or "educated" and "uneducated" speech are ultimately grounded in social rather than linguistic factors.

Some of the themes that recur throughout this course are:

  • Differences and similarities across languages and cultures, including language structures, language use, and patterns of language change;
  • the relationship between language and social life, particularly relations of race, class and gender;
  • issues of language politics, including policies regarding bilingualism/multilingualism, the development of official and unofficial standard languages, and the social consequences of language change and language death.

Throughout the course, we will consider examples and case studies from the United States and throughout the world. There are no prerequisites for this class. Requirements for the class include a midterm, a final, and a series of short assignments. The materials for this course include textbook(s) and articles that will be available on electronic reserve.

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

ANTHRCUL 320 — Mexico: Culture and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frye,David L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course will look at culture and society in the large and diverse country of Mexico. The fundamental aim of the course is to give students an overview of Mexican history, geography, cultural diversity, and contemporary social issues. Themes to be covered include: the search for a Mexican identity (how culture and national identity in Mexico have been historically and socially constructed over the past century); cultural variations among Mexicans; region, "race," and ethnicity in the construction of Mexican culture; gendered views of Mexicanness and Mexican culture; the family or household and the community as centers of identity, social action, and economy; religious traditions and religious change; urban and rural views of the nation; performance, culture, and ethnic identity; "borderlands"; the disparate impact of globalization, transnational migration, and transculturation on communities and individuals across Mexico; and the regions of Mexico. The books to be read include Judith Adler Hellman, Mexican Lives; Ruth Behar, Translated Woman; Peter Cahn, All Religions Are Good in Tzintzuntzan; Matthew Gutmann, The Meanings of Macho; and others. Grades will be based on class participation, three papers, and a final project.

ANTHRCUL 331 — Kinship, Social Organization, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Akin,David W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

In this course we will examine anthropological approaches to social relationships, broadly defined, both historically and across the field of anthropology today. A diverse range of topics will be addressed, beginning with kinship and marriage, and then moving on to exchange, relationships to place, and various relational aspects of religion such as rituals, taboos, ancestral spirits, and sorcery and witchcraft. We will give particular attention to how these and other aspects of social relationships are changing as part of and in response to global processes, and their association with various forms of social inequality. Our ethnographic cases will be drawn mostly from Africa and Melanesia.

It is recommended that students have had some exposure to anthropology, such as an introductory course. Grading will be based on two exams covering readings and lectures, a short research paper, and participation in weekly discussion sections. Reading will consist of a coursepack of articles, and two books: (1) Ladislav Holy. 1996. Anthropological Perspectives on Kinship. Chicago: Pluto Press; and (2) Edward Schieffelin. 1976 [republished in 2005]. The Sorrow of the Lonely and the Burning of the Dancers. New York: St. Martin's Press.

Advisory Prerequisite: One course in Anthropology.

ANTHRCUL 344 — Medical Anthropology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

The concepts of "health" and "illness" are culturally constructed. This course will examine beliefs about these states of being, and the ways in which they are both products and illustrations of the larger social system in which they are found. Ideas about the history of disease, social construction of the body, illness causation, therapies and therapists, healing symbols and rituals, and the social roles of patients and healers will be explored. In addition to examining these beliefs and processes cross-culturally, we will also draw upon examples from Western biomedicine — among them cancer, AIDS, eating disorders, schizophrenia — to illustrate the powerful ways in which illness and culture are bound together.

Enforced Prerequisites: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222; or sophomore and above

ANTHRCUL 356 — Topics in Ethnology
Section 001, LEC
Global History: Cities & Discontent

Instructor: Murphy,Edward L

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course approaches the question of global history through the accelerating processes of urbanization from the nineteenth century to the present. Paying particular attention to the ways in which expanding cities have been the location of tensions in governance and social class, the course will explore how the geographies of cities have both reflected and impacted central processes of state formation and capitalist accumulation in the modern world. During the course of the semester, we will examine efforts to transform urban life through processes of reform and resistance, focusing on social movements and the development of professional reformers in such areas as architecture, criminology, public health, and urban planning. The course will draw from monographs and studies based in a number of different world regions, making equal use of the work of historians, social geographers, and anthropologists.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRCUL 101.

ANTHRCUL 357 — Undergraduate Seminar in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
Environmental Anthropology

Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar reviews the history of environmental anthropology, and explores recent trends and directions in environmental anthropology. We will interrogate the boundaries of this field of knowledge, considering works that range from human ecology, to political economy (and political ecology), to structuralist and post structuralist analyses of human relationships to the natural world. We will read a balanced load of ethnography and theory, and will also see a range of films. In our film viewings and readings we will be emphasizing a few key contexts about which have been produced works from divergent traditions of environmental anthropology: The Congo basin in equatorial Africa, Indonesia, and the forests of the Amazon basin. Three short papers will be the most important basis for grading, along with course participation and presentations during seminar discussions. Permission for this course to be a meet together with the Program in the Environment is pending; the home department would be anthropology.

Required texts include: Anna Tsing, In the Realm of the Diamond Queen; Richard Roy Grinker, Houses in the Rainforest; and Laura Rival, Trekking Through History.

Advisory Prerequisite: A course in cultural anthropology and junior standing.

ANTHRCUL 399 — Honors in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Honors Ethnology

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This Honors course sequence in cultural anthropology is designed for undergraduate anthropology concentrators who are specializing in cultural anthropology and have applied for senior Honors in the Department of Anthropology. This course is divided into two parts. In the Fall Term, the students will meet once a week in a seminar to read and discuss a selection of significant monographs and papers in ethnology, and a selection of writings on fieldwork methods and research strategies in ethnology. This seminar provides background for the students to define their own senior Honors thesis project. By the end of the term, the students will have decided on a project, and begun preliminary work on it. In consultation with the Honors advisor the student may request any member of the Anthropology Department to serve as a main thesis advisor or second reader. In the Winter Term, the students will convene periodically in seminar with the Honors advisor to discuss their research projects and get feedback from the group, as well as staying in contact with the Honors advisor and second reader. By the end of the term, each student should have completed the research and write-up for their thesis so that they can make a formal summary presentation of it for the group. Original field research or library work may be used for Honors projects.

ANTHRCUL 402 — Chinese Society and Cultures
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hathaway,Michael John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

China is an emerging force in the global economy and a rising political superpower, yet most of us know very little about what happens behind what was once known as "the bamboo curtain."

This class will explore the recent social history of the People's Republic of China. Since the reform era in 1978, state socialism has become less dominant, and new forms of governance and social life are now evolving that are not quite capitalist, not quite socialist. We will examine these recent changes, especially in light of the radical social revolution carried out under Mao Zedong, beginning in 1949. This revolution meant massive transformations in gender roles, religion, education, and work — — nearly every facet of everyday life.

To understand these changes and their significance, we will use a broad range of academic readings, mainstream and independent documentary film, oral histories and translated readings from Chinese fiction. We will examine the lives of urban street hustlers, young factory workers, government officials, environmental protestors, rural farmers, sex workers, the nouveau riche and others in relationship to changing state and international contexts.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTHRCUL 408 — Maternal/Child Health and Environmental Pollution in Africa
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Renne,Elisha P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will focus on the effects of environment and environmental pollution on the health of women and children in several sub-Saharan African countries. Selected readings in medical anthropological, public health, and environmental pollution as well as films examining connections between health, environmental factors, and development will be discussed. Specific health problems covered will include the effects of wood smoke pollution on infant and child health, the use of pesticides and women's reproductive health, waterborne diseases, automobile emissions and respiratory health problems, and waste disposal and contagious disease. The course will be evaluated through a health intervention project proposal and presentation, class participation, and a mid-term exam and a final intervention proposal report.

Intended audience: Upper-level undergraduates; graduate students in anthropology, medical anthropology, and public health.

Course Requirements: Participation in discussion of class readings(10%); 5-pg preliminary project proposal with primary source citations and secondary references (20%); mid-term in class exam (25%); presentation of health intervention proposal (15%); final health intervention report, 13-15 pg, double-spaced, including references, tables, etc. (30%).

Class Format: 3 hours per week in seminar format.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or above.

ANTHRCUL 409 — Peoples and Cultures of the Near East and North Africa
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Karl,Brian B

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a survey of anthropological approaches to the cultures of what is now called "the Middle East," a region extending from Morocco to Iran. Primary attention is given to Arabic-speaking, Muslim societies. We will examine enduring topics of interest, such as tribalism, kinship, gender, and Islam. We will also explore new problems (and styles of analysis) that call older interests into question. These include (trans)nationalism, mass culture, the political consequences of popular literacy, globalization, disaporas, and novel forms of ethnographic engagement with these topics. Finally, the course addresses the growing number of Middle Eastern communities that now live outside the region, with a special focus on Arabs in Detroit. Classes will include a mix of lecture and discussion, and readings will be drawn mostly from recent monographs. Grades will be based on two essays, with an additional short paper for graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing.

ANTHRCUL 411 — African Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owusu,Maxwell K

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Africa is considerably more important, more interesting and certainly more complex than its popular image suggests. The course provides an introduction to the peoples and cultures of tropical (sub-Saharan) Africa. Topics covered include: the historical geography of Africa; pre-colonial and colonial roots of contemporary African state-societies; case studies of changing systems of kinship, marriage, family and gender relations; race, ethnicity, language, class and the dynamics of cultural, national and pan-African identity; religion, music, dance and the arts in contemporary Africa; globalization and the challenge of African development. The course is open to both anthropology concentrators and non-concentrators. Grades are based on four 5-6 page or three 7-8 page, type-written, take-home papers, and contributions to class discussion. Film/videos shown in class when available.

Basic Texts: Basil Davidson, Modern Africa, A Social and Political History, R. Olaniyan, ed African History and Culture.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO, Junior standing and CAAS 200

ANTHRCUL 423 — Anthropology in Melanesia: History and Contemporary Developments
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kirsch,Stuart A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Anthropological research in Melanesia has played a significant role in the history of the discipline, from Malinowski's early work in the Trobriand Islands to the scholarship of the 1970s and 1980s, which George Marcus recently described as the "era of Melanesian ethnography in its historical climax." In the first half of the semester, we will read and discuss anthropological contributions from Melanesia to long-standing debates about magic, sorcery, ritual, exchange, social relations, and gender. During the second half of the course, we will examine the more recent generation of ethnographies from Melanesia that addresses the state, modernization, and processes of globalization, including engagements with mining companies, commodities, Christianity, and NGOs. In particular, we will consider how these two ethnographic trajectories intersect, providing us with the opportunity to examine how culture remains significant within historically changing circumstances. Reading assignments include a number of ethnographies and articles made available primarily through electronic course reserves. Requirements include regular participation plus several essays and shorter assignments.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRCUL 101 or 222.

ANTHRCUL 439 — Economic Anthropology and Development
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Owusu,Maxwell K

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Contemporary Third World countries of Africa, Asia, Middle East, Latin America and the Caribbean are undergoing rapid and exciting social and economic transformation. This course introduces students to the practical and theoretical problems raised by the modernization of rural, village-based tribal and peasant economies and the urbanization and industrialization of local and national communities of the non-western world.

The FIRST PART of the course begins with a discussion of the making of the Third World economies with the overseas expansion of Europe and the creation of the world market and the international economic order. This is followed by a review of the nature of economic anthropology-its scope, basic concepts, methods of investigation and objectives-and how it relates to conventional/development economics.

The SECOND PART of the course examines anthropological (social science) perspectives on ‘development' and ‘underdevelopment,' ideas of ‘progress,' ‘modernization,' ‘industrialization,' ‘human development,' ‘sustainable development' and the UN Millennium Development Goals.

The THIRD PART of the course focuses on specific country (cross-cultural) case studies of problems or topical issues of Third World development and underdevelopment: e.g., eradication of extreme poverty and hunger; gender equality and women's empowerment; combating HIV/AIDS; ensuring environmental sustainability; debt relief; combating corruption; indigenous peoples; agriculture and rural development; global tourism; micro-finance; international migration; NGO's and developing global partnership for development; global security; and globalization.

The course CONCLUDES with an overview of global challenges of Third World development and underdevelopment in post-cold war, post 9/11 environments. The course is recommended for anthropology concentrators and all students with serious interest in comparative cultures and Third World development and underdevelopment. Lecture/discussion format. Films and videos shown in class when available. Final grades based on three take-home papers and contributions to class discussion.

Basic texts: Lucy Mair, Anthropology and Development; and Polly Hill, Development Economics on Trial.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing or permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 447 — Culture, Racism, and Human Nature
Section 001, LEC
Culture, Racism, and Human Nature

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course examines the possible origins of culture to understand the unique behavior and historical development of Homo sapiens and traces the salient features of human history and contemporary modernity to discuss and explain the nature of humans. The understanding of the nature of humans and their development will enable the students to comprehend, explain and resolve racism, part of a pan-human phenomenon. Is racism fundamental to the character of human culture? The course will suggest that many of our modern social problems have a common generation — the nature of human culture. That would suggest that the solutions will require a social transformation in the character of human culture. These examinations of human culture will require us to return to the discussions of Leslie White (culture is autonomous) and Alfred Kroeber (culture is superorganic) to determine the possibilities of social transformations that contemporary society may require. The course looks at human Biophobia — the denial, defiance, and defilement of our animal kinship. This biophobia and denial gives humans an inferiority complex that is only assuaged by classism, racism, ethnocentrism, sexism, sectarianism, ageism, nationalism, disableism, speciesism, and power (CRESSANDS-POWER). The present stockpile of human weapons, the rage of international terrorism, and the oppression that CRESSANDS-POWER creates requires a new human revolution — THE ECOLOGICAL REVOLUTION. In that revolution the human body and the Earth will have such value that we can develop a new human-global community and end the human plague that CRESSANDS-POWER has brought upon our species.

ANTHRCUL 451 — African-American Religion
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Williams,Melvin D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the nature of religion in the lives of humans, within the framework of culture, and as a pervasive social institution. It will focus on the special case of the intensive and involved character of religion in the history and the lives of African-Americans. These special uses of religion create special problems. We will analyze those problems. The course objectives are to: introduce the subject of religion as a social institution, as a pervasive component of culture, and as a contemporary adjustment and adaptation to peculiar social problems; demonstrate how an anthropological analysis can be used to understand religion in contemporary society; develop skills in critical thinking and analysis; present the relationship between culture, institutions, religion, subculture, and the nature of man (humans); and enable students to understand the religious institutions of humans generally and African-Americans specifically. The course is open to all students, and it requires no special background or preparation. There will be two examinations. Class participation and attendance are graded.

Advisory Prerequisite: One introductory course in the social sciences. CAAS 201 recommended.

ANTHRCUL 458 — Topics in Cultural Anthropology
Section 001, SEM
Citizenship, Participation, and Democracy

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This advanced undergraduate seminar offers new ways of viewing citizen, participation, and democracy by exploring the intersection of theoretical currents and ethnographic research. Students will read a series of rich ethnographic accounts on themes including participation, international aid organizations, globalization, social movements, and electoral processes. The ethnographies will also generate discussion about engaged research and the work of indigenous intellectuals. We will relate these accounts to theoretical currents including governmentality, hegemony, deliberative democracy, public sphere, civil society, and transnationalism. Readings will cover many parts of the world, and are intended to interest students working in the United States as well as internationally. Classes will primarily involve discussion of assigned texts. Requirements include active participation in class discussion, a presentation of the readings (one week), weekly on-line response papers, and final essay or take-home exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior & above/permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 458 — Topics in Cultural Anthropology
Section 002, SEM
Political Violence & Historical Memory

Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this seminar we will explore the historical context, cultural construction, and social consequences of political violence. Among the themes that we will examine are: the racialization and gendering of violence; colonial, national, and globalizing forms of violence; spatial and temporal dimensions; terror and meaning; historical memory and commemoration. We will examine a range of cases, including India, Northern Ireland, Sri Lanka,, Argentina and Guatemala, and will use a variety of materials including film. Students will make class presentations and write brief commentaries and a final paper. The seminar is open to graduate students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior & above/permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 474 — Language, Ethnicity, and Nationalism
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Managan,Jane Kathryn

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

Many Americans and Europeans assume that communities normally are, or ought to be, monolingual — that language differences divide people from one another, while a common language unites them. Yet, much of the world is multilingual.

What do language differences mean for their speakers' social identities and relationships? In this course we will consider the relationship between communication and community — particularly as these have been conceptualized (and ideologized) under the rubrics of "tribe," "ethnic group," and "nation." We will explore what kinds of social groupings those terms might (or might not) label, and how they might (or might not) connect with languages and with communication networks. Our approach will be crossculturally comparative and, where relevant, historical. Through a discussion of selected theoretical works and case studies, we will consider topics such as language use in small-scale societies; the functions of multilingualism; the politics of language standardization and print media; language and the idea of "nation" in nineteenth-century Europe; the European colonial expansion and its influence on indigenous peoples and languages; and the role of language in nationalistic movements.

Course readings will consist mainly of journal articles and book chapters, along with books such as Hobsbawm's Nations and Nationalism Since 1780 and Anderson's Imagined Communities. In addition to discussing general issues and some case materials presented in readings and in class, students will independently explore and report on a particular case study. Evaluation will be based on class participation (including discussion-leading and a class presentation), some short writing assignments, a take-home test, and a term paper.

No prerequisites, but students should have at least junior class standing.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

ANTHRCUL 499 — Undergraduate Reading and Research in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Independent reading and research under the direction of a faculty member. Ordinarily available only to students with background in anthropology.

Advisory Prerequisite: PER. INSTR.

ANTHRCUL 527 — Traditions of Ethnology II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Keane Jr,Edward Webb; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

A continuation of Traditions in Ethnology I. It covers the period from about 1950 to the present.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 541 — Environmental Anthropology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kirsch,Stuart A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a total of six credits elected through ANTHRCUL 541 and ANTHRARC 586.

Contemporary approaches to environmental anthropology have largely moved away from the study of human adaptation to specific environments to research on the causes of environmental degradation. Anthropologists have also shifted their attentions from the ritual regulation of human-environmental relations to contexts in which competing ideologies about nature are in dialogue. Finally, assumptions about the operation of relatively closed ecosystems have given way to attention to the accelerated circulation of persons, things, and ideas through globalization. Anthropologists interested in political ecology study the institutions and forces that increasingly mediate anthropogenic impacts on the environment, including the behavior of corporate actors, states and their legal systems, debates in the media, and nongovernmental organizations (NGOs) that focus on environmental issues. Readings include several classic monographs and a number of contemporary studies in political ecology and related fields of inquiry. Additional readings will be made available primarily through electronic course reserves. Requirements include regular participation and a substantial independent research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: Senior concentrators, Graduate standing, or permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 548 — Theory and Practice in Medical Anthropology
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Renne,Elisha P; homepage
Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar examines the theoretical foundations of medical anthropology as well as particular studies which represent subfield interests in cultural concepts of health and illness; local and global aspects of reproductive health; the social construction of knowledge and politics of science; ethnomedicine and healing; health and structures of violence, and perceptions of environment and health.

ANTHRCUL 558 — Current Issues in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
Europe and Diaspora: Narratives, Memories and Marked Lives

Instructor: Hart,Janet Carol

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The topic of Europe and diaspora sprawls across such vast cultural and geo-political territory that it threatens to be about nothing in particular. This course will attempt a narrower approach. In large part, our focus will be the African diaspora in France, Britain, Germany, and Italy, although for heuristic and comparative purposes, we will draw a wider circle to include other diasporas in Europe, such as Jewish, Arab, Chinese and Sikh, as well as places beyond continental Europe, such as the island of La Réunion, a French department in the Indian Ocean where the euro circulates and the school system is run according to French laws and administrative dictums. Diaspora (a Greek term signifying the scattering of seeds) and its combination of movement, mixture, resistance and adaptation, require us to define our terms. We will discuss possible working definitions of diaspora, and consider them in light of other related constructs such as globalization, transnationalism, creolization, and cosmopolitanism. Also on our agenda will be temporal and spatial questions of primordial origins and purity. Course materials will consist of an interdisciplinary range of theoretical essays, ethnographies, historical studies, literary works, and schedules permitting, films. Evaluations will take into account class participation including sessions lead by pairs of discussion leaders, weekly responses to readings and ongoing conversations to be posted on CTools (or in hardcopy form if preferred), and a final essay or term paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 558 — Current Issues in Ethnology
Section 002, SEM
Anthropology &Environmental Conservation

Instructor: Hardin,Rebecca D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on topics in ethnology. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: 400-level coursework in Anthropology, Graduate standing, and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 577 — Language as Social Action
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mannheim,Bruce; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Develops a framework for viewing languages as a social, cultural, and political matrix, a form of action through which social relations, cultural forms, ideology, and consciousness are constituted.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRCUL 576. permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 619 — Proseminar on Latin American and Caribbean Studies
Section 001, SEM
What is Left in Latin America?

Instructor: Coronil,Fernando

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is a proseminar, intended for graduate students from different disciplines interested in understanding the history and representation of Latin America and the Caribbean in the twentieth century. It will cover selected aspects of the cultural and social history of Latin America and the Caribbean.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

ANTHRCUL 658 — Special Topics in Ethnology
Section 001, SEM
Democracy: Ethnography and Social Theory

Instructor: Paley,Julia Felice; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar offers new ways of viewing democracy by exploring the intersection of theoretical currents and ethnographic research. Students will read a series of rich ethnographic accounts on themes including participation, international aid organizations, globalization, social movements, and electoral processes. The ethnographies will also generate discussion about engaged research and the work of indigenous intellectuals. We will relate these accounts to theoretical currents including governmentality, hegemony, deliberative democracy, public sphere, civil society, and transnationalism. Readings will cover many parts of the world, and are intended to interest students working in the United States as well as internationally. Classes will primarily involve discussion of assigned texts. Requirements include active participation in class discussion, a presentation of the readings (one week), weekly on-line response papers, and final essay or take-home exam.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 675 — Topics in Anthropological Linguistics
Section 002, SEM
Form and Interpretation

Instructor: Mannheim,Bruce; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will give in- depth coverage to topics of interest to the instructor. Students should check the Schedule of Classes for the focus in any given term.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor

ANTHRCUL 760 — Culture and Cognition
Section 001, SEM
Evolution and Culture

Instructor: Kitayama,Shinobu

WN 2007
Credits: 2

This ongoing seminar is open only to students actively participating in the Culture and Cognition Training Program. The program encourages the study of thinking in cultural contexts. The goal is to prepare students to explore how cognition is contingent on historical forces and socially situated on the one hand, and to discover how mental processes alter and shape the content of cultural forms on the other. Seminars form the discussion core for the program, but students are also expected to take content and methodology courses in anthropology and to do interdisciplinary research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate student in Anthropology or Psychology or permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 777 — Linguistic Anthropology Laboratory
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Lemon,Alaina M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Linguistic anthropology is a laboratory field. The reasons for it were several. First, we regard graduate training in linguistic anthropology to much more closely resemble an apprenticeship model, than in cultural anthropology. Second, there are new technologies being developed that are increasingly being used in data analysis, including sound and visual analysis of face-to-face interaction. These require special training and resources. And third, but perhaps most importantly, a laboratory model provides a framework for encouraging research collaboration among graduate students and between students and faculty, rather than a model of research as done by a solitary ethnographer. This aspect of the lab framework has worked very well. A single lab-group has met on a regular basis for almost 10 years, discussing papers by visitors, discussing each other's works in progress, and practicing talks for professional meetings and for job interviews. We have succeeded in creating a strongly supportive, cooperative, and nurturing environment for within which students have been able to try out first ideas and first critiques of work by many of the leading figures in the field. The special issue of Michigan Discussions in Anthropology on Linguistic form and social action is a direct outcome of the lab structure.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing in Anthropology or a related discipline.

ANTHRCUL 830 — Anthropology and History Workshop/Reading Group
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Cohen,David W
Instructor: Skurski,Julie A

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This one-credit course is to support a workshop/reading group of students in the Anthro/History program. It will be a seminar in format with the purpose of discussing works-in-progress and especially significant pieces of scholarship in the field. Presentations will be circulated and read in advance. The two hour session is dedicated fully to discussion of the work among all those present.

ANTHRCUL 957 — Research Practicum in Anthropology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 8

The course provides students with the opportunity to design and to conduct fieldwork or laboratory analysis of original anthropological data. A faculty member may undertake it as a special aspect of a research project under investigation or the student under the supervision of a faculty member may initiate it.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 958 — Anthropological Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires a substantial research paper or an extensive exploration and critical evaluation of relevant sources on a particular topic.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 959 — Survey of Literature on Selected Topics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course requires an annotated bibliography. A written statement detailing a program of readings and objectives is to be submitted to the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ANTHRCUL 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Advanced Doctoral student. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ANTHRCUL 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Peters-Golden,Holly; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: ANTHRO,Graduate standing

ANTHRCUL 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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