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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ARCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 14 of 14
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ARCH 201 — Basic Drawing
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Trandafirescu,Anca

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

A freehand studio drawing course limited to pencil and pen, this introductory class concentrates upon seeing, describing, and analyzing form through linear graphic means. Though intended primarily for students considering a design-related career, it is open to students from any discipline wishing to improve their visual literacy. The first half of the course — unbiased toward a particular art — focuses upon understanding the role of line in creating form. Principles of orthographic and perspective projection are introduced in the second half of the semester.

ARCH 201 — Basic Drawing
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Trandafirescu,Anca

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

A freehand studio drawing course limited to pencil and pen, this introductory class concentrates upon seeing, describing, and analyzing form through linear graphic means. Though intended primarily for students considering a design-related career, it is open to students from any discipline wishing to improve their visual literacy. The first half of the course — unbiased toward a particular art — focuses upon understanding the role of line in creating form. Principles of orthographic and perspective projection are introduced in the second half of the semester.

ARCH 202 — Graphic Commun
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Unverzagt,Christian Robert

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This studio drawing course emphasizes mechanical drawing means and is intended primarily for students contemplating careers in architecture and related professional fields. The student is introduced to a wide range of basic techniques, conventions, and means used in the design fields, as well as selection of drawing instruments and surfaces. Considerable attention is given to the development of a disciplined approach to the construction of measured drawings.

ARCH 212 — Understanding Architecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Harris,A Melissa; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Credit Exclusions: Not open to students enrolled in Architecture.

This course examines visual, cultural, historical, and philosophical aspects of the man-made environment using examples from the field of architecture and the allied arts. The intent of the course is to provide a general view and a rudimentary understanding of the profession and the discipline of architecture. Upon completion of the course, the student is expected to demonstrate an understanding of the ideation context and the formal attributes of the built environments of various eras. The format includes two weekly lectures, weekly discussion sections, and several basic design problems.

ARCH 218 — Visual Studies
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Gilpin,Dawn M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This studio course provides an introduction to the elements, principles, and techniques that underlie and inform the analysis, creation, and evaluation of visual organizations and are crucial to the process and product of form-making. The course consists of: 1. An overview of selected topics pertaining to the perception of visual organizations. 2. The study of visual organizations entailing point, linear, two-, and three-dimensional elements or combinations thereof. 3. The study of color and its influence on visual organizations. A variety of studio exercises are used to apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the term.

ARCH 218 — Visual Studies
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Gilpin,Dawn M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: CE

This studio course provides an introduction to the elements, principles, and techniques that underlie and inform the analysis, creation, and evaluation of visual organizations and are crucial to the process and product of form-making. The course consists of: 1. An overview of selected topics pertaining to the perception of visual organizations. 2. The study of visual organizations entailing point, linear, two-, and three-dimensional elements or combinations thereof. 3. The study of color and its influence on visual organizations. A variety of studio exercises are used to apply the knowledge and skills acquired throughout the term.

ARCH 409 — Special Topics in Architecture
Section 002, LEC
Building Tokyo

Instructor: Takenaka,Akiko
Instructor: Wilkins,Gretchen Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course explores the relationship between social and political forces and architectural production in Tokyo from 1868 until the present. Since Tokyo became Japan's capital in 1868 its urban form has evolved through a perpetual cycle of construction and destruction. The Kanto earthquake of 1923, the air raids of 1945, the Olympic games of 1965, the "bubble" economy of the 1980s, and current proliferation of neo-Corbusian "cities with the city" have collectively produced the elusive spatial character of Tokyo. Significant historical events frame the discussion of key architectural projects and urban spaces in Tokyo. The course is divided by themes including spaces of transportation, commerce, death and memory, religion, sex, leisure, culture, dwelling, and office. Examining Tokyo through the last 150 years enables us to understand not only the development of modern and contemporary Japanese architecture, but also the influence of socio-economic and political forces on the built environment, as well as how the resulting spaces are utilized.

A one-week trip to Tokyo is a mandatory component of this course. During the trip, students will conduct research on a chosen site, from which they will develop a final project. Expenses for the trip will be covered by the History of Art Department, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, Office of International Programs, and the Center for Japanese Studies. Students are required to pay a $150 fee for the trip, and must cover most of the meals in Japan. A passport is required for the trip. Enrollment by instructors' consent only.

III. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: UG ARCH STU.

ARCH 409 — Special Topics in Architecture
Section 004, LEC
Architecture and Modernity

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course surveys the history of architecture in relation to the history of modernity, from the first quarter of the 19th century onwards. The course will trace the genesis and development of foundational themes of architectural modernism, making reference to parallel developments in other fields, ranging from new scientific discourses to new media. Important themes in the history of architecture, such as — structural rationalism, historicism, neo-Kantian formalism, narrative referentiality, theories of reception, and (utopian) socialism, — will be considered in relation to corollary or contradictory developments in other disciplines. The course will be organized chronologically, beginning with radical changes to architecture and artistic culture in the 19th c. It will be based on a series of comparative case studies focused on specific objects and texts placed within their geographical and historical context, making use of recent exhibitions and publications that bring architecture into relationship with other developments in the modern period. The class is a lecture course with opportunity for class discussion on a regular basis.

IV. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: UG ARCH STU.

ARCH 423 — Introduction to Urban and Environmental Planning
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Quinn,Kelly Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A comprehensive introductory course. Methods and processes in governmental planning and development of human activity systems requiring space, capital, and management components in the metropolitan environment. Major topics include: space and location planning, zoning and subdivision regulations, urban form and design, new town planning, housing urban renewal, transportation, metropolitan intergovernmental relations, comprehensive urban developmental planning, population and economic planning studies, planning techniques and methods. Emphasis is placed on recent developments and emerging problems.   

ARCH 509 — Experimental Course
Section 002, SEM
Building Tokyo

Instructor: Takenaka,Akiko
Instructor: Wilkins,Gretchen Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course explores the relationship between social and political forces and architectural production in Tokyo from 1868 until the present. Since Tokyo became Japan's capital in 1868 its urban form has evolved through a perpetual cycle of construction and destruction. The Kanto earthquake of 1923, the air raids of 1945, the Olympic games of 1965, the "bubble" economy of the 1980s, and current proliferation of neo-Corbusian "cities with the city" have collectively produced the elusive spatial character of Tokyo. Significant historical events frame the discussion of key architectural projects and urban spaces in Tokyo. The course is divided by themes including spaces of transportation, commerce, death and memory, religion, sex, leisure, culture, dwelling, and office. Examining Tokyo through the last 150 years enables us to understand not only the development of modern and contemporary Japanese architecture, but also the influence of socio-economic and political forces on the built environment, as well as how the resulting spaces are utilized.

A one-week trip to Tokyo is a mandatory component of this course. During the trip, students will conduct research on a chosen site, from which they will develop a final project. Expenses for the trip will be covered by the History of Art Department, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, Office of International Programs, and the Center for Japanese Studies. Students are required to pay a $150 fee for the trip, and must cover most of the meals in Japan. A passport is required for the trip. Enrollment by instructors' consent only.

III. 4

Advisory Prerequisite: Year 5 standing and permission of instructor

ARCH 603 — Sem Arch History
Section 001, SEM
Urbicide: Violence Against the City

Instructor: Herscher,Andrew H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

During the wars in Bosnia and Croatia in the 1990s, the term "urbicide" emerged to describe violence aimed specifically at cities. Using case studies in ex-Yugoslavia, Israel/Palestine, Zimbabwe, Iraq and the United States, this seminar will study urbicide as a form of political violence, mode of urbanism, subject of textual and visual representation, and product of cultural ideology.

In the seminar, we will investigate such questions as:

  • What continuities underlie urban destruction in war and in processes sanctioned as "modernization," "urban renewal," and "reconstruction"?
  • How can the interpretive tools of architecture and urbanism be applied to violence against buildings and cities?
  • How does the textual and visual representation of urbicide shape its effects and remembrance?
  • How do testimonies, diaristic accounts, visual documentation and reportage differ as modes of witnessing violence such as urbicide?

Course material will include theoretical readings on space and violence; narrative accounts of urban destruction; photographic documentation; and film and video. As well as providing students with an introduction to the particular subject of urbicide, the course will also introduce students to a set of more general issues, including the theorization of the city; the visual and textual representation of violence; the problematics of witnessing; and the city as a site of visual and textual production.

Advisory Prerequisite: 500 level Architectural History course/permission of instructor

ARCH 603 — Sem Arch History
Section 002, SEM
Transactions between Architecture and Photography

Instructor: Zimmerman,Claire A

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This seminar will look at architecture in and through mass media in the 20th century, in relation to theories of perception, to architectural abstraction, to the history of media (photography, film, journalism, and now digital media), and to contemporary theories of vision and visuality. It will focus in closer detail on the relationship between photography and architecture, for the purposes of greater specificity. For students of design, it has two main intentions: to re-configure consciousness of how photographic images function in relation to three-dimensional space; and to provide a discipline with which to confront the subject of spatial production in the age of digital reproduction. While a recent spate of monographs and studies on the subject has opened a legitimate area of historical consideration, so far very little has been done to analyze the role of photography in the larger project of modern and contemporary architecture. Important questions await further study. We will open up some of these questions through a series of historical case studies in which architecture and photography are closely related. These include:

Architecture and the invention of photography: Daguerre and Fox Talbot; 19th c French. topographic photography; Aleksandr Rodchenko, Laszlo Moholy-Nagy, and constructivist photography; Adolf Loos's critique of photography; Photographic and architectural exhibitions in Germany, 1925-33 Le Corbusier and Marius Gravot; MoMA 1932 and 1947; the reception of photographic images; Julius Shulman and Richard Neutra; James Stirling and the breakdown of photography; Manfredo Tafuri's operative photography; Yukio Futagawa and photographic colonization; "The New Topographics" exhibition and; 1970s topographic photography; Herzog + de Meuron (Eberswalde, Cottbus, Basel); Recent German photographers of architecture: the case of Brasilia; Global architecture and the photographic image.

The course will also consider the various contexts of photography and how context influences the transmission of information. These contexts include archives, architectural journals, general interest journals, books on photography, books on architecture, and a variety of exhibition contexts. Requirements: Reading, attendance, and participation in class discussion; one short presentation on an assigned topic; one longer presentation on a topic of the student's selection; final research paper or visual analysis project as agreed upon with instructor. Estimated cost: $50 or more, but less than $100. IV, 4

Advisory Prerequisite: 500 level Architectural History course/permission of instructor

ARCH 609 — Topics in Disability Studies
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Kuppers,Petra

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course provides an interdisciplinary approach to disability studies, including focus on the arts and humanities, natural and social sciences, and professional schools. Some topics include history and cultural representation of disability, advocacy, health, rehabilitation, built environment, independent living, public policy. The point of departure of the course is the idea that disability provides a critical framework that reorients the basic assumptions of various fields of knowledge, from political science to architecture, from engineering to art history, from genetics to law, from public policy to education, from biology to poetry, and so on. Disability Studies views people with disabilities not as objects but as producers of knowledge whose common history has generated a wide variety of art, music, literature, and science infused with the experience of disability. Students will have the opportunity to interact with visiting speakers from a broad range of fields. The course is offered for 1 or 3 credits. Accessible classroom with realtime captioning. For more information, please contact Tobin Siebers at tobin@umich.edu.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing

ARCH 716 — Adv Top in Des Stds
Section 001, SEM
Peripheral Modernisms: Latin American 20th Century through the Lenses of Architecture

Instructor: Lara,Fernando Luiz

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

This course focuses on the artistic and cultural practices of modernism as it emerged in Latin America. It uses modern architecture as a departure point for investigating the political, social and economic factors as well as the artistic expression of what has been called "peripheral modernization" in the twentieth century. The course will focus especially on Brazil, but will also consider the cases of Argentina, Mexico and Venezuela. Organized mostly around discussions and student presentations, the course requires students to analyze artistic and cultural manifestations of a variety of modernist movements. The first half of the course is devoted to the ideas behind the concepts of modernity, modernization and modernism, paying special attention to the ways these concepts and their periodization vary in different national contexts. The second half of the course uses Latin American Modern Architecture as a case study for exploring how these concepts were expressed through a specific artistic form.

Advisory Prerequisite: MS of PhD student standing/permission of instructor

 
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