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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ASIAN
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 31 of 31
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ASIAN 152 — Introduction to Japanese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Designed primarily for freshmen and sophomores, the course focuses on a few recurrent concerns in the Japanese tradition from the earliest times to the present. Topics to be considered include man and nature, language and culture, the individual and the state, men and women, and death and transcendence. Readings in mythology and representative works of the literature and religious texts, lectures, discussions, and short papers.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

ASIAN 205 — Modern East Asia
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer
Instructor: Pincus,Leslie B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS
Other: WorldLit

This course is an introduction to modern China, Korea, and Japan from 1800 to the present. It covers the following topics: (1) China's progressive decline and rejuvenation, the impact of imperialism, the rise and development of the PRC; (2) the struggles of Korea, its colonization by Japan; liberation and division into the two Koreas, and the rising economic status of the South; and (3)the end of feudalism in Japan, the building of a modern state and economy, Japanese imperialism, postwar recovery, and the rise to super-power status. Taking a broad comparative perspective on EA, the course explores the inter-relations between political economy, society, and culture in each country within an emerging modern world system. This is a continuation of HISTORY 204; however that course is not a prerequisite and no previous background on the subject is required. Two lectures and one discussion section each week. There will be a midterm and final exam.

ASIAN 220 — Introduction to the Study of Asian Religions
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pranke,Patrick Arthur

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course is designed as an introduction to the study of Asian religions. It aims to cover the historical development (from ancient times down to the present) of Hinduism, Buddhism, Daoism, Confucianism and Shinto, etc., in cross-cultural settings that will include India, China, Korea, and Japan. Readings will include both primary texts (concerning doctrine, philosophy and religious practices) in English translation and secondary scholarship.

ASIAN 222 — Great Books of Japan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Introduction in translation to books which have influenced the Japanese people through the ages.

Advisory Prerequisite: A knowledge of Japanese is not required.

ASIAN 251 — Undergraduate Seminar in Chinese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Daoism

Instructor: Elstein,David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

Is there such a thing as "Daoism," and if so, what is it? In this course we will examine some of the philosophical and religious traditions that are categorized as Daoism, focusing on the philosophy of the Warring States period (441-221 BCE), religious developments in the Six Dynasties (220-589 CE), and modern Western interest in Daoism to try to answer some key questions.

  • What kinds of religious goals are part of Daoism?
  • How are different ritual, meditative, alchemical, and sexual practices all related?
  • Is Daoism really a good source for feminist and environmental ethics?

All readings will be in English. There are no prerequisites. No knowledge of Chinese is necessary.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Chinese language is required.

ASIAN 252 — Undergraduate Seminar in Japanese Culture
Section 001, SEM
Japanese Storytelling in Words and Pictures

Instructor: Carr,Kevin Gray; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

What makes a good story and how do you tell it? This class will examine the close relationship of artistic and literary productions in Japan from the Heian Period to the present day, considering the ways that stories are imagined in different media, genres, and social contexts. We will consider the significant differences between visual and textual narrative through focused readings of primary and secondary texts and narrative theory. Emphasis will be placed on developing critical reading and looking skills through a series of hands-on exercises designed to illuminate the process and significance of creating, viewing, and transmitting the stories that have moved people in Japan up to contemporary times.

Advisory Prerequisite: No knowledge of Japanese language is required.

ASIAN 260 — Introduction to Chinese Civilization
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Elstein,David

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

This course is intended to introduce students to major issues in pre-modern Chinese history. The course covers the political, cultural, social, and intellectual history from the Neolithic to the Mongol conquest (in the 13th century). Some of the major questions we will treat include: Is "China" the oldest continuous civilization? Was it culturally and ethnically homogeneous? Was Chinese traditional culture and society "patriarchal"? To what extent was the state successful in penetrating into the daily lives of individuals? Course assignments will include not only reading primary and secondary literature (entirely in English); but they will also require students to analyze visual sources (to a lesser degree). No assumed knowledge of Chinese history, culture, or language required.

ASIAN 265 — The Arts and Letters of China
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This interdisciplinary and multimedia course is taught jointly by faculty specialists in Chinese philosophy, religion, history of art, drama, literature, and visual culture. It is not a survey course. Instead the main task will be the sustained and critical study of a number of significant and representative works in order to present some major themes of the distinct and complex civilizations of China. In spite of inner tensions, this is a cultural tradition that can be seen as a highly integrated system composed of mutually reinforcing parts, making such an interdisciplinary and multimedia approach particularly effective. Toward the end of the term we will observe the system's collapse as it struggles to adapt to the modern world, consider how our themes continue, persist, or change. Background lectures on language and early religion will be followed by topics and readings that include: Confucianism (Confucius and Mencius) and Daoism (Laozi and Zhuangzi); themes in Chinese religiosity, Chan (Zen) Buddhism; religious art; lyricism and visual experience in poetry and landscape painting; music; traditional storyteller tales; poetic-musical theater; fiction of modern "revolutionary" and post-Mao China; and Chinese film.

The format of the course consists of three hours of lectures and one hour of discussion. The lectures will be given by
Baxter (language);
Brown (early culture and Confucianism);
Heinrich (modern culture, film)
Lam (music);
Lin (Daoism, poetry, and garden);
Ning (religious art);
Laing (art history);
Rolston (theater and traditional fiction);
Robson (religion).

Students should register for both the lecture section, and one of the three discussion sections. No prerequisites. Requirements: occasional brief responses to readings, three short papers, and final exam.

ASIAN 280 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, LEC
Studying and Playing Southeast Asian Music.

Instructor: Walton,Susan Pratt

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Bali, Java, Thailand, and many other areas in Southeast Asia have for years held a fascination for Western social scientists, travelers and artists. This area of the world is especially renowned for the richness and variety of its performing arts traditions. These include social, court and ritual dances, music of bronze and bamboo ensembles, and elaborate theatrical traditions — all of which arise from complex mixes of Hindu, Buddhist, Islamic, Christian and animist traditions. This course consists of two parts: surveying the major musical genres of SE Asia (in an RC classroom) and learning to play the music of the Javanese gamelan orchestra in my home, 12 minutes by foot from the RC.

The survey part of the course will show how music, dance and theatrical forms are linked to the cultures from which they spring and how they both express and challenge traditional values. The complex and shifting relationships between the performing arts, religion and ritual will be a major focus of our inquiry. We will ask the following kind of questions: What impact have Westernization and industrialization had on traditional musical forms, especially in the Philippines, Indonesia and Thailand? How do Indonesian youths transform American rock music into musical idioms expressive of traditional Islamic values? How are the ambiguities between spectators and performers and between the past, present and future related to Burmese cosmological concepts? The musical cultures of Indonesia (Bali, Java, and Sumatra) will be the main focus of our inquiry, but the musics of Malaysia, Thailand, Burma and the Philippines will also be surveyed. Video tapes, cassette recordings and slides will complement the lectures.

In the musical practice part of the course, students will learn to play many of the instruments of the gamelan: gongs and racks of horizontally suspended gongs, metallophones and drums. Since the intervals and scales used are entirely different from western ones, learning to sing with this ensemble will be especially interesting. We will learn many of the pieces orally, as do the Javanese, but we will also learn to read the Javanese cipher notation system. Javanese music is structured in cycles. Part of the function of the course is to show how the specific musical elements are expressive of basic cultural views. Cyclicity is evident not only in the musical system but also in calendric and cosmological concepts. All are welcome: no prerequisites and no prior experience expected.

This course satisfies the RC's Arts Practicum requirement.

Book: Balinese Music, Michael Tenzer

ASIAN 292 — Introduction to Japanese Art and Culture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carr,Kevin Gray; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in HISTART 495.

This course adopts an interdisciplinary approach to the history of Japanese visual culture, introducing the art of the archipelago from ancient times through the present day. Although primarily a chronological examination of key artistic monuments, the class will also discuss thematic issues such as the materiality of art, cultural exchange, the meaning of nature, and the relationships between artistic production and religion, class, and society. The course makes no claim to be comprehensive, and the goal of the lectures is only to introduce you to the panoply of Japanese art and the ways that it interacted with the cultures that produced it. At the end of the course, you should have a better understanding of many aspects of Japanese history, thought, religion, and visual culture; but you should also develop a heightened awareness of and sophistication about your visual world in general.

III. 1, 2, 3, 4

ASIAN 302 — Rewriting Identities in Modern Japan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zwicker,Jonathan E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This introductory course to modern Japanese fiction examines how novels and short stories written after 1868 engage the issue of national, cultural, and social identities. The inquiry in the course simultaneously moves in two directions. We examine how fiction written in an age of national print-capitalism participates in the work of building a common understanding of a nation and its people, but we shall also see how the same fiction can spotlight divisions of gender, sexual orientation, class, generation and region.

Advisory Prerequisite: Knowledge of Japanese is not required

ASIAN 380 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, LEC
Politics of Emotion/Modern Chn

Instructor: Luo,Liang; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

The intricate relationship between the personal and the political in modern Chinese intellectual life has long permeated fiction, memoir, performance arts, visual arts, and cinema and new media produced throughout the twentieth century and continue to be produced today. This course reads emotion as a political battle and engages students in a discovering tour throughout twentieth and twenty-first centuries China, where interiority and ideology, sentimentality and sacrifice, and personal and political present themselves not only as inseparable, but also as mutually reinforcing. Combining the approaches of political psychology, literary criticism, intellectual history, women's studies, as well as visual and media studies, this course aims both at introducing modern Chinese literary and cultural studies as a field to interested students, but also at challenging conventional disciplinary boundaries in order to cultivate critical thinking skills that will be indispensable for students interested in the humanities and social sciences in general.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 001, SEM
Theories of the Post Colonial

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Over the last two decades, postcolonial studies has had a significant impact on how literary critics, anthropologists, and historians analyze colonial relationships and the political and cultural legacies of colonialism. This course introduces students to the key concepts, methods, and debates in the field and explores their relevance to Asian studies. Topics to include: Orientalism and its critics, anticolonial nationalisms, nation and gender, subalternity and representation, colonial and postcolonial modernity, globalization and diaspora, the political and intellectual stakes and contexts of the field of postcolonial studies.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

ASIAN 381 — Junior/Senior Colloquium for Concentrators
Section 002, SEM
Crit Approach to Asian Studies

Instructor: Zwicker,Jonathan E

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR

Intended to familiarize students with major theories of interdisciplinary study in literature and history and provide a critical context for the study of Asia. We will think about how critical models and methods can broadly inform work on Asian history, literature, and cultural studies and how these tools can be brought to bear on archival material in the research collections of the University of Michigan.

Enforced Prerequisites: ASIAN 235 with at least a C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or senior standing and concentration in Asian Studies.

ASIAN 395 — Honors Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Honors students in Asian Studies should use this course number for their Honors thesis, but will normally work with whatever faculty member is closest to the subject of the thesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: Honors candidate in Asian Studies and permission of instructor.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 001, SEM
Missionary Media and Promotional Performance: The Propagation of Faiths in Contemporary Southeast Asia

Instructor: Arps,Bernard

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The use of media and performance for religious propagation in contemporary Southeast Asia, more specifically Indonesia, stands central in this course. There is much similarity between religion, spiritualities that do not or cannot lay claim to the status of "religion," and other complexes of beliefs and practices such as political ideologies or consumerism. It is theoretically helpful therefore to consider the missionary uses of media and performance in the broader context of ‘promotion,' a notion that covers propaganda, publicity, conscientization, enculturation, and kindred processes. We will devote part of the course to the use of media and performance in promotion generally, though most attention will go to the promotion of religious thought and practice strictly speaking. Much of the case material we will examine derives from Indonesia and is to do with the propagation of Islam and responses to it in Christian and Hindu and Buddhist circles, but we will also discuss analyses of the promotional use of media and performance elsewhere in Asia, and even in Africa and the USA. Course requirements include a research paper, a presentation, and classroom participation.

This course is open to advanced undergraduates and graduate students.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 002, SEM
Qing Studies, 1600-1927

Instructor: Cassel,Par Kristoffer

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Qing Empire (1644-1911) was one of the largest territorial empires in the world, yet it was run with a lean bureaucracy and comparatively small armed forces. In recent years, new research methods and improved access to new archives in China have enhanced our understanding how this vast empire actually operated. Through carefully selected readings in both recent and classical works on Qing history, this course will revisit different themes in Qing history such as the imperial house, ideology, the exam system, taxation, law, gender relations, military affairs and international relations. Prior knowledge of Chinese history is desirable, but the course is also aimed at advanced history students who have a general interest in East Asian history. Grades will be based on class participation and two papers.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 003, SEM
Javanese Puppet Theater Workshop

Instructor: Bin Soegito,Sigit

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Javanese shadow puppet theater (wayang) is one of the great classical puppet traditions in the world. Javanese puppetry depicts the ancient epic stories like the Ramayana and Mahabharata that have been told and re-told for centuries and still are vital tropes in the lives of Asians today. Students who take this course will have a unique and exciting opportunity to participate in a modern creation of a wayang performance in March 2006, accompanied by the University of Michigan Gamelan. Our teacher will be the Distinguished Visiting Professor, Sigit Adji Sabdoprijono, who has also won top regional and national prizes as a puppeteer in both traditional wayang and an innovative new form, wayang sandosa. He will teach students to manipulate the puppets, develop the dialogue and give voice to the puppets.

He will focus on wayang sandosa, which incorporates both new performance techniques (multiple puppeteers, dancers casting human shadows on the screen, and modern lighting techniques) and cultural influences from outside Indonesia (hip-hop and rap for instance). No prior experience necessary. For information, contact Susan Walton, swalton@umich.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 004, SEM
Cultural History in Contemporary Japan

Instructor: Fukuoka,Maki

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This interdisciplinary seminar explores recent articles in Japanese on the topic of cultural history. Focusing on the ways in which the notions of "culture" and "history" are problematized and interpreted by prominent scholars and critics in Japan, we will familiarize ourselves with pivotal concepts and their interpretations to understand the emerging ideas of and about cultural history in contemporary Japan. The readings will focus on the issues of representation, media, gender, history writing, and literature by figures such as Kinoshita Naoyuki, Yoshimi Shunya, Narita Ryuichi, Ueno Toshiya, Wakakuwa Midori, Imamura Hitoshi, and Saitou Minako.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 005, SEM
Future Buddhas and Buddhist Kings

Instructor: Pranke,Patrick Arthur

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Since ancient times in Sri Lanka and Southeast Asia, Buddhist monasticism has maintained a symbiotic relationship with Buddhist kingship, legitimating royal power in exchange for patronage while propagating a common religious ethos and symbolic order among the populous. But Buddhist institutions and symbols have also been used effectively by rebels, disaffected subjects and rival king to topple weak or unpopular rulers. In this course we will examine the influence of Buddhist ideology on the societies and political cultures of Sri Lanka, Burma, and Thailand, tracing the emergence and evolution of Buddhist statecraft, religio-national identity and economy. We will conclude with an exploration of Southeast Asian Buddhism under colonialism and in the post-colonial world.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 006, LEC
Indian Cinema: Bollywood & Beyond

Instructor: Dass,Manishita

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course simultaneously provides an introduction to the diverse cinemas of India and investigates the concept of "national cinema" through the history, aesthetics, and cultural politics of cinema in the country that annually produces the highest number of films in the world. Focusing on Indian films from the post-independence era, we will explore how Indian films both participate in and unravel the grand narratives of Indian nationalism; examine how they re-imagine the nation and how the nation is re-imagined around them; ask how they mediate heterogeneous experiences of modernity, and class, gender, and sexual identities; track their movements across national borders; and use them to scrutinize and evaluate existing theoretical debates about image-making and the nation.

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 008, LEC
Dialogue of Violence

Instructor: Nornes, Abé Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3


This course will explore the relationship of WWIIs Pacific Theater to moving image media in two movements. First, a comparative history of Hollywood and Japanese filmmaking during the war explores issues of race, nationality, propaganda, and violence. The second half of the course continues to analyze these problems by turning to post-1945 (and post-9/11) attempts to remember, critique and commemorate (or forget) WWII in media as disparate as television, video art, and the internet.

Dialogue of Violence will screen propaganda by Frank Capra, Kurosawa Akira, John Ford, Bruce Conner, Imamura Shohei and others to ask questions like:

  • Do nations have their own, distinct languages of violence?
  • What makes a hero?
  • What's Fordian about John Ford's Sex Hygiene?
  • How many women does it take to build one B-29 a minute?
  • Are stereotypes actually a mundane part of everyday life?
  • What does a mushroom cloud mean?
  • Is memory a form of history?
  • What happens when racism and global warfare meet?

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 010, SEM
Mughal India

Instructor: Mir,Farina

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines the political, social, cultural, and religious history of India during the period of the Mughal Empire (1526-1858).

This course has no prerequisites. It satisfies the History department's pre-1800 requirement.

Students will be evaluated primarily on the basis of two exams and a 4-5 page essay.

Texts include:
John Richards, The Mughal Empire (Cambridge, 1993)
Jamal Elias, Trans., Death Before Dying: The Sufi Poems of Sultan Bahu (U California, 1998)

ASIAN 480 — Topics in Asian Studies
Section 011, SEM
Building Tokyo

Instructor: Takenaka,Akiko
Instructor: Wilkins,Gretchen Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course explores the relationship between social and political forces and architectural production in Tokyo from 1868 until the present. Since Tokyo became Japan's capital in 1868 its urban form has evolved through a perpetual cycle of construction and destruction. The Kanto earthquake of 1923, the air raids of 1945, the Olympic games of 1965, the "bubble" economy of the 1980s, and current proliferation of neo-Corbusian "cities with the city" have collectively produced the elusive spatial character of Tokyo. Significant historical events frame the discussion of key architectural projects and urban spaces in Tokyo. The course is divided by themes including spaces of transportation, commerce, death and memory, religion, sex, leisure, culture, dwelling, and office. Examining Tokyo through the last 150 years enables us to understand not only the development of modern and contemporary Japanese architecture, but also the influence of socio-economic and political forces on the built environment, as well as how the resulting spaces are utilized.

A one-week trip to Tokyo is a mandatory component of this course. During the trip, students will conduct research on a chosen site, from which they will develop a final project. Expenses for the trip will be covered by the History of Art Department, Taubman College of Architecture & Urban Planning, Office of International Programs, and the Center for Japanese Studies. Students are required to pay a $150 fee for the trip, and must cover most of the meals in Japan. A passport is required for the trip. Enrollment by instructors' consent only.

III. 4

ASIAN 499 — Independent Study-Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Directed readings or research in consultation with a member of the Asian Studies faculty.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 501 — Social Scientific Studies of Historical and Contemporary China
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Gallagher,Mary E; homepage
Instructor: Park,Albert Francis; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

CCS 501 is part of a two-semester Interdisciplinary Seminar in Chinese Studies intended for M.A. and Ph.D. students from all disciplines. Disciplinary departments create barriers between shared problems, methods, and sources. ISCS is designed to recover and highlight the connecting links of Chinese Studies: the multidimensional study of China encompassing all social groups and the entire range of human experience, from literature and the visual arts to politics and economics. There are no formal prerequisites, except permission of the instructors.

CCS 501 will introduce graduate students to current issues in social scientific studies of China, emphasizing different methodological approaches drawn from multiple disciplines. The course will address four common themes — family and social organization, poverty, social stratification and social mobility, and political economy — that intersect the multiple social science disciplines. Each class will discuss one or more disciplinary approaches to a common subject through class discussion of exemplary studies of China. We will discuss the existing state of the field on each subject and emphasize the different research design and data available for such studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 536 — Seminar in Traditional Chinese Fiction
Section 001, SEM
Reading China's Most Famous Novel — Honglou meng

Instructor: Rolston,David Lee

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Honglou meng (Dream of the Red Chamber; a.k.a., Shitou ji or The Story of the Stone) is arguably the single most famous and influential work of Chinese literature. This 120-chapter novel is simultaneously a tragic love story and the chronicle of the decline of an enormous aristocratic household. With its reputation as a "veritable encyclopedia of traditional Chinese life," it provides an excellent window on a vanished society. Many people in China reread it year after year. Mao Zedong wrote a commentary on it. But reading this novel can be dangerous! There are stories of young people wasting away under its romantic effect and old people coming to blows over the respective merits of the two main heroines. In this seminar, besides reading and discussing the novel itself, we will also look at a wide variety of traditional and modern commentary, as well as sequels and adaptations for traditional and modern media, and try to answer such questions as why this novel was so famous, and will it continue to be so in the future. A term paper is required. A minimum of the equivalent of three years study of modern Chinese is required. All possible effort will be made to accommodate the schedules of all students interested in taking the course. The meeting times for the class will be set at an organizational meeting scheduled for January 4, 2007. Please contact the instructor if you have any questions.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIAN,ASIANLAN 302; Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASIAN 552 — Medieval Japanese Prose
Section 001, SEM
The Poetics of the Sublime

Instructor: Ramirez-Christensen,E

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar will focus on discourses on poetry and Nô performance that shaped the enduring sense of the Japanese sublime in such articulations as mono no aware (the moving power of things), yûgen (ineffable depth), and sabi (existential loneliness). We will relate the notion of the sublime to phenomenological issues of language, mind, and the nonduality of subject/object. We will also examine how the sublime links to the medieval concept of cultural praxis as a michi (Way) and to contemporary questions of reading, writing, and the constitution of literature. Non-Japanese specialist students are welcome to join the seminar, using English translations of the materials.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASIANLAN 434.

ASIAN 699 — Directed Readings
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6
Other: INDEPENDENT

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASIAN 990 — Dissertation Research — Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Credit Exclusions: This course replaces JAPANESE 990, CHIN 990, and BUDDHST 990.

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

ASIAN 995 — Dissertation Research — Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Credit Exclusions: This course replaces JAPANESE 995, CHIN 995, and BUDDHST 995.

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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