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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = ASTRO
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 33 of 33
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111, 115, 130, or 160.

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 101 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 006, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 111, 115, 130, or 160.

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these obj ects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 102 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 112, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these obj ects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a one-hour discussion period each week. REVISED FOR WINTER 2007: Having trouble with Math Anxiety? The discussion section includes a workshop that covers basic tools and methods for solving problems. Basic high school math is a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 101, 115, 120, 130, or 160

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 — Introductory Astronomy: The Solar System and the Search for Life Beyond Earth
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Hartmann,Lee William
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 101, 115, 120, 130, or 160

This course presents an introduction to the field of astronomy and astrophysics with an emphasis on the discoveries from space exploration. The first third of the course deals with understanding the history of astronomy, orbits, gravitation, optics, and the properties of light and matter. The rest of the course explores the properties, origin, and evolution of the major planets, asteroids, comets, the Sun, and other components of the Solar System with particular emphasis on comparative aspects with respect to the Earth. The origin and formation of the Solar System and the origin of life will also be discussed. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 111 has a two-hour laboratory section every week. ASTRO 101 has a one-hour discussion section. Course requirements include assigned reading, section meetings, homework, observations, quizzes, midterm, and a final examination. Laboratory sections include observations with telescopes.

Advisory Prerequisite: A basic high school math and science background.

ASTRO 112 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a two-hour evening laboratory period each week. Laboratory sections feature planetarium demonstrations, telescope observations, and applications of astronomical techniques. Basic high school math are a prerequisite.

ASTRO 112 — Introductory Astronomy: Stars, Galaxies, and the Universe
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Oey,Marion S; homepage
Instructor: Miller,Jon Matthew

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 120, 130, or 160

Discover the nature of stars, black holes, luminous nebulae, supernovae, galaxies, and other cosmic phenomena. In this concept-focused course you will learn what these objects are, how they formed, and what is ultimately in store for the universe. Explore the roles of light, energy, and gravity in astronomy, and get hands- on experience with telescopes and other astronomy tools during mini-labs.

Three lectures and a two-hour evening laboratory period each week. Laboratory sections feature planetarium demonstrations, telescope observations, and applications of astronomical techniques. Basic high school math are a prerequisite.

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 001, LEC
Mini-Course Meets Jan. 08, 2007-Feb. 21, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Aller,Monique Christine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 002, LEC
Mini Course Meets Jan. 08, 2007-Feb. 21, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Cameron,Scott Aron; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 003, LEC
Mini Course Meets March 5, 2007-April 17, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Brink,Thomas Gentry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 004, LEC
Mini Course Meets March 5, 2007-April 17, 2007. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Cameron,Scott Aron; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 005, LEC
Meets Jan 8-Feb. 21. (Drop/Add deadline=Jan. 24).

Instructor: Aller,Monique Christine

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 127 — Naked Eye Astronomy
Section 006, LEC
Meets March 5-April 17. (Drop/Add deadline=Mar. 9).

Instructor: Brink,Thomas Gentry; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Minicourse

Students learn about the nature of the most common astronomical objects that can be observed by eye, such as the Sun, Moon, planets, stars, comets, and meteors. The motion of these objects in the sky is studied along with their influence on the Earth

ASTRO 142 — From the Big Bang to the Milky Way
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Putman,Mary E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to students who have completed or are enrolled in PHYSICS 112.

This course will trace our progress in understanding the nature of the Universe from the early Greeks to today, with emphasis on our current understanding based on Einstein's relativity. The Big Bang Theory will be presented and origin of matter will be traced from the formation of atoms, to the formation of the first stars, to the build-up of galaxies such as the Milky Way. Dark energy and the ultimate fate of the universe will also be discussed in the context of the recent results from space satellites concerning the cosmic microwave background radiation that fills the universe and the large scale distribution of galaxies that form the cosmic web. This course is intended for non-science concentrators with a basic math and science background.

Intended audience: Introductory course for non-science concentrators with an interest in the evolution of the Universe.

Course Requirements: Assigned reading, six homework assignments with some basic math required, and in-class discussion worksheets. Three exams, short answer and multiple choice.

Class Format: 3 hours of lecture weekly

ASTRO 160 — Introduction to Astrophysics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bregman,Joel N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in ASTRO 102, 112, 120, or 130

Discover the extraordinary nature of the astronomy: stars; black holes; galaxies; dark matter; and the universe. This course uncovers the astrophysics behind the most important and common astronomical phenomena in our universe. A major topic is stars and their lives, which can end violently through supernova explosions, leaving behind black holes or neutron stars. This is followed by the study of the Milky Way and its content, other galaxies, and how unseen "dark" matter shapes the universe we see today. We conclude with the origin of the universe and the limitations of looking back in time. In this course, the professor interacts closely with the students, plus the laboratory will provide practical experience in observational techniques, including use of our telescopes. There will be a midterm, final, homework, and lab assignments.

Intended Audience: Introductory course for either non-science concentrators with some math or physics background, or for science concentrators.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 or 160.

ASTRO 210 — The Universe Through the Eyes of Magellan
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mateo,Mario L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Learn about forefront astronomy discoveries being made with the Magellan Observatory, one of the largest telescopes in the world and the main University of Michigan observatory. We will discuss a variety of exciting ongoing astronomical projects, learning the background behind each of the programs and the potential rewards of the investigations. Students will learn the properties of the telescope and of the instruments available, and how one goes about setting up an observing run to achieve the best results. The course concludes with groups of students working together to create observing proposals to use Magellan in a research project.

There will be a midterm, final, and homework assignments. This course is intended for either non-science majors or science majors.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASTRO 101/111, 102/112, 160, or any 300 or 400 level ASTRO course

ASTRO 261 — Navigation
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Notbohm,Andrew David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The purpose of this course is to educate students in all aspects of marine navigation, from getting a vessel underway from port through open ocean navigation using both celestial and electronic means. The content of the course is divided into three major areas. The first section focuses on piloting, emphasizing the safe navigation of vessels in coastal waters. This section provides an introduction to navigational instruments and aids to navigation. The second section concerns celestial navigation, the ability to determine position through observation of celestial bodies. Students learn how to determine position based on the use of the sextant and various almanacs and mathematical tables. The third section of the course considers electronic navigation.

ASTRO 261 — Navigation
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Notbohm,Andrew David

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The purpose of this course is to educate students in all aspects of marine navigation, from getting a vessel underway from port through open ocean navigation using both celestial and electronic means. The content of the course is divided into three major areas. The first section focuses on piloting, emphasizing the safe navigation of vessels in coastal waters. This section provides an introduction to navigational instruments and aids to navigation. The second section concerns celestial navigation, the ability to determine position through observation of celestial bodies. Students learn how to determine position based on the use of the sextant and various almanacs and mathematical tables. The third section of the course considers electronic navigation.

ASTRO 361 — Astronomical Techniques
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Aller,Hugh D; homepage
Instructor: Monnier,John D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Topics include astronomical instrumentation, techniques for obtaining observational data, and the reduction and analysis of observations. Emphasis is placed upon obtaining and analyzing data in such fields as astrometry, radio astronomy, and spectroscopy. Three lectures and two hours of laboratory or observing weekly.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASTRO 160 or permission of instructor

ASTRO 389 — Individual Studies in Astronomy
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Individual reading and study in astronomy under the guidance of the instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTRO 399 — Introduction to Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is for students in Astronomy who are prepared to undertake a limited research project under the guidance of a member of the staff of the Department of Astronomy. ASTRO 399 is open to qualified students in other departments and is subject to approval by concentration advisors and members of the staff of the Department of Astronomy.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

ASTRO 401 — Solar System Astrophysics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Cowley,Charles R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Studies the properties of the planets, comets and asteroids, their formation, composition, chemistry, geology, and atmospheric activity.

Advisory Prerequisite: ASTRO,MATH 116, PHYSICS 140 and 240. Permission of instructor

ASTRO 404 — Galaxies and the Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bernstein,Rebecca A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Examines the properties of galaxies, large-scale structure in the universe, and cosmological models. The basic aspects of galaxies are explained, orbital theory, spiral arms, the missing mass in galaxies, galaxy evolution, and the starburst phenomenon. The clustering of galaxies, the hot intracluster medium and the dynamical evolution of clusters. Expansion of the universe, the cosmic microwave background, the inflationary universe, Big Bang nucleosynthesis, and the origin and growth of structure in the universe.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 216 and prior or concurrent enrollent in PHYSICS 340 and PHYSICS 390

ASTRO 534 — The Extragalactic Universe
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Richstone,Douglas O; homepage
Instructor: Gnedin,Oleg Y

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course provides an overview of the study of the physical universe as a whole and in terms of its component structures (galaxies and larger structures). It focuses particularly on the universe in the matter dominated epoch, and places emphasis on the dark matter component of the universe. Topics will include the structure and dynamics of the matter dominated universe, classical tests of the model, the early universe and the microwave epoch, probes of dark matter, estimation of cosmological parameters, gravitational lensing, clustering and large scale structure and formation and evolution of structure.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 535 — Astrophysics of the Interstellar Medium
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bergin,Edwin Anthony; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

In this course, we will discuss atomic and molecular processes, along with interactions of radiation and matter and the latest pertinent observations, will be applied toward understanding the physical, ionization, thermal, chemical, emission, and absorption properties of the interstellar medium. Attention will be given to fill regions, planetary nebulae, supernova remnants, cool neutral gas, molecular clouds, hot or X-ray-emitting gas, and particulate "dust" grains. In addition, the global and evolutionary properties of gas and dust in our Galaxy will be carefully examined.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 690 — Theoretical Astrophysics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Special topics in Theoretical Astrophysics. Topics to be decided by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 691 — Observational Astrophysics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4

Special topics in Observational Astrophysics. Topics to be decided by instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 699 — Special Problems
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

A course on problems in astronomy. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 901 — Research in Theoretical Astrophysics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Research in theoretical astrophysics. The universe displays a wonderful diversity of structure spanning an enormous range of scales in mass, length, and time. The physical character and dynamic history of many of these astrophysical systems — stars, galaxies, the entire Universe — are not fully understood. Michigan theoretical astrophysicists are working to improve our understanding of how the Universe, and the structures within it, came to be. Topics of interest include development of the early Universe, inflation, formation of galaxies and clusters of galaxies, star formation and cosmology, and dynamics of astrophysical fluids. Much work is guided by observations from optical telescopes, such as the Michigan-Dartmouth-MIT telescope, as well as several NASA missions.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 902 — Research in Observational Astrophysics
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Using large telescope facilities, research is done in observational astrophysics at the two 6.5 m telescopes of the Magellan Project at the Las Campanas Observatory in Chile, the 2.4-m Hiltner and 1.3-m McGraw-Hill telescopes of the MDM Observatory in Arizona, and the 26 m radio telescope at Peach Mountain Observatory near Ann Arbor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

ASTRO 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

ASTRO 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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