< back Send To Printer  
LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = BIOLOGY
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 33 of 33
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
BIOLOGY 102 — Practical Botany
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Estabrook,George F

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

BIOLOGY 102 is an introductory course about plants and how they are used by people. Each week there are two one-hour lectures, one afternoon two-and-a-half hour lab at the Botanical Gardens, and one one-hour discussion on main campus. Lecture topics include:

  • what plants look like;
  • how plants work;
  • how they make their living in nature;
  • using this knowledge to landscape your house, caring for your house plants, and growing your gardens;
  • medicinal plants;
  • plant breeding;
  • agriculture and food;
  • environmental and psychological importance of plants.

Busses take students to the Botanical Gardens for lab and back to main campus afterwards. In the lab, each student has his/her own personal space in a greenhouse to grow plants that can be taken home during the term. Lab activities may include:

  • looking at plants;
  • planting seeds;
  • growing plants;
  • rooting cuttings;
  • making medicinal salve;
  • testing soil;
  • preserving garden produce;
  • making hanging baskets;
  • using plant dyes;
  • making bonsai;
  • grafting plants;
  • transplanting; and
  • forcing bulbs to flower.

The text, New Illustrated Guide to Gardening, will be useful throughout your life. The only prerequisite is your interest in plants. You MUST attend the first lecture and first lab (Jan. 9 — 11) for which you are registered to retain your place. Your attendance throughout the term determines part of your grade.

Textbook (required): New Illustrated Guide to Gardening. ISBN 0-7621-0276-4
Textbook (suggested): Indoor Plants. ISBN 0-89577-921-8
Course Pack (required): Available at Dollar Bill Copying, South University and Church St.

BIOLOGY 108 — Introduction to Animal Diversity
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Myers,Philip; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

In this course, we'll take a broad look at the diversity of animals. Our goals are to give you information that will enhance your appreciation of the natural world, and also to deepen your understanding of current issues concerning biodiversity and conservation. Lectures will be presented by faculty who work with each of the animal groups being considered. They'll describe the diversity and natural history of their groups, and they'll discuss issues concerning conservation or biodiversity. Students will attend three lectures and one discussion section per week. Grades for the course will be based on a three one-hour exams, and on participation in class and discussion section activities.

Textbook: Animal Diversity. Hickman, et al. 4th Edition.

BIOLOGY 109 — Ecological Knowledge and Environmental Problem Solving
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Lehman,John T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

The world presents us with many types of environmental problems. Everyone needs to have a basic understanding of the scientific knowledge and theories that are needed to solve these problems, so that they can make informed decisions as educated citizens. We will use a case study approach to learn how to apply knowledge and theory to the process of developing solutions.

Examples of the kinds of case studies that we will study include:

  • Use and subsequent ban on use of DDT and PCB, including examples from Michigan
  • Control of vampire bats in Central and South America
  • Reservoir construction and mercury poisoning
  • Role of wastewater treatment facilities in the water quality of lakes along the Huron River near Ann Arbor
  • Acid Rain
  • Biological species invasions
  • Ecological effects of nuclear radiation
  • Climate change and efforts to reverse current trends
  • Landscape fragmentation, spotted owls and other examples
  • Habitat restoration

Additional readings will include the nature of science, debates about science vs. "junk science", and even about the mindsets of typical scientists. This course can be elected by undergraduate students in any year of their degree program. There will be two lectures per week.

Grading is based on two in-class written examinations and graded evaluation of a final paper or PowerPoint presentation. The exams will focus on the critical elements of different case studies. The final project will give you the opportunity to identify an environmental problem, state elements of theory, report present understanding about the problem, and suggest ways to verify the facts.

BIOLOGY 118 — AIDS and Other Health Crises
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bender,Robert A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

This course is designed for non-science concentrators with little or no background in the sciences. The course focuses on the concepts of health and disease and their impact on society. It also focuses on the impacts of the structures and attitudes of society on health and disease. We will examine a number of health crises, especially AIDS, from the multiple viewpoints of science, medicine, public health, law, social prejudices, and the historical effects of health and disease. Specific topics will include extensive discussions of "Mad Cow Disease," Syphilis from 1880 to the present, and the tragic story of Mary Mallon ("Typhoid Mary") as well as some discussion of cholera, tuberculosis, influenza, smallpox, anthrax, and the black death. About half the course will be devoted to AIDS. The course consists of two 90-minute lectures per week, and a one-hour discussion led by a GSI.

Texts:
Deadly Feasts by Richard Rhodes
And the Band Played On by Randy Shilts

Useful reference: AIDS Update 2004

BIOLOGY 120 — First Year Seminar in Biology
Section 001, SEM


Instructor: Cortes-Ortiz,Liliana

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: FYSem

Credit Exclusions: Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

This seminar provides a broad introduction to primate behavior and examines the social and sexual behavior of Neotropical primates such as howler monkeys, capuchin monkeys, muriquies, marmosets, and tamarins. Major issues and topics in current behavioral studies of primates will be addressed through readings of research journals and books and group discussions. We will also make use of oral presentations on particular aspects of the behavior of different species of Neotropical primates, and one short writing assignment. Through all of these activities students will be immersed in the fascinating lives of wild primates that occur in some of the most amazingly diverse tropical locations of Central and South America.

There will not be a textbook. Readings will come from a number of research articles, and from Primate Behavioral Ecology, by K. Strier, 3d edition, 2006, and Animal Behavior, by J. Alcock, 8th edition, 2005.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

BIOLOGY 162 — Introductory Biology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Olsen,Laura J; homepage
Instructor: Hunter,Mark D

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Online Schedule of Classes) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, (734) 764-1430.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130.

BIOLOGY 162 — Introductory Biology
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Olsen,Laura J; homepage
Instructor: Hunter,Mark D

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Honors

Credit Exclusions: BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Online Schedule of Classes) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, (734) 764-1430.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130.

BIOLOGY 162 — Introductory Biology
Section 003, LEC

Instructor: Benard,Rebecca B
Instructor: Raymond,Pamela A

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Online Schedule of Classes) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, (734) 764-1430.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130.

BIOLOGY 162 — Introductory Biology
Section 004, LEC

Instructor: Benard,Rebecca B
Instructor: Raymond,Pamela A

WN 2007
Credits: 5
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: BIOLOGY 162 is not open to students who have completed BIOLOGY 152, 154 or 195. Credit is granted for a combined total of 12 credits elected in introductory biology.

A one-term introductory course intended for concentrators in biology, other science programs, or preprofessional studies. Other suitably prepared students wishing detailed coverage of biology are also welcome. The aims of BIOLOGY 162 are:

  1. to provide factual and conceptual knowledge;
  2. to give an integrated overview of the central tenets of modern biology;
  3. to afford experience in obtaining and interpreting biological hypotheses; and
  4. to develop thinking and writing skills.

Topics in BIOLOGY 162 are divided among four areas:

  1. cellular and molecular biology;
  2. genetics;
  3. evolution; and
  4. ecology.

Students MUST:

  1. attend 3 lectures, 1 one-and-a-half hour discussion, and 1 three hour lab section each week;
  2. ATTEND THEIR ASSIGNED DISCUSSION AND LAB MEETINGS EACH WEEK STARTING WITH THEIR LAB AND DISCUSSIONS IN THE FIRST FULL WEEK OR THEIR SPACE MAY BE GIVEN TO SOMEONE ON THE WAITING LIST; and
  3. RESERVE the times and dates for the midterm and final exams (as specified in the Online Schedule of Classes) before enrolling.

Students usually purchase a textbook, lab manual, and course pack consisting of a syllabus and lecture notes. No other study guides or supplementary materials need be bought.

For Honors credit, register for one of the Honors discussion/lab sections.

For further information contact the Introductory Biology office, (734) 764-1430.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 130.

BIOLOGY 200 — Undergraduate Tutorial
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course is intended for sophomores learning research and laboratory techniques, working under close supervision of a faculty member. It also may be used for directed readings at an appropriate level. It includes reading on a significant topic and regular consultation with the faculty member chosen to supervise the work. The required paper could be on the scientific literature in a broad field, on biological issues on which the student may want to do continuing work, or on the detailed results of research in a biological specialty. Conferences, seminars, readings, and assigned writings are used to develop critical perspectives on modern biological problems and to provide breadth and sense of historical continuity in biological thought.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of faculty member in biology.

BIOLOGY 207 — Introductory Microbiology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ammerlaan,Marcus C; homepage
Instructor: Barnhart,Michelle Marie

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

This course in microbiology consists of two one-and-a-half hour lectures and one three-hour laboratory session each week. The lectures describe the basic biology of microbial life, with emphasis on bacteria in the Domain Bacteria and Domain Archaea, and including eukaryotic microbes (protists and fungi) of the Domain Eukarya.

Lecture material in the course is divided into three approximately equal sections.

  1. The first section examines bacterial and eukaryal cell structure and functions; and bacterial nutrition, cultivation, and growth; molecular biology of bacteria, including regulation of gene expression; genetics and genomics; virology; and genetic engineering.
  2. The second section of the course covers microbial evolution, metabolic and ecological diversity, nutrient cycles, and symbiotic interactions.
  3. The third section of the course describes medically related topics, including bacterial and fungal pathogenesis, epidemiology, viral diseases, and immunology.

The laboratory sessions are designed to develop skill in fundamental aspects of microbiological work, including microscopy, aseptic and pure-culture techniques, experimental manipulation of bacteria, microbial enrichment, and isolation and characterization of bacteria.

Grades for the course are based on three lecture exams together with assessments of practical skills from the laboratory sessions.

The course is required for the Microbiology concentration, and it is appropriate for the Biology and the Cell and Molecular Biology concentrations.

Textbook (required):
Brock Biology of Microorganisms, M.T. Madigan, et al., 11th edition, Prentice-Hall, 2005.

Laboratory manual (required): Benson's Microbiological Applications: Laboratory Manual in General Microbiology (complete version), A.E. Brown, 10th edition, McGraw-Hill, 2005.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162.

BIOLOGY 208 — Embryology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Liu,Margaret Kim

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This embryology course consists of two one-and-a-half hour lectures. We will study the entire organism as a function of time. We will explore how a single cell, the fertilized egg, develops into a multicellular organism with an emphasis on human development. Other model systems will also be used to provide stage-by-stage comparisons and to illustrate developmental conceptual frameworks that are shared by all vertebrates. The primary goal of this course is to introduce students to fundamental aspects of embryonic development, while fostering scientific analytical and communication skills.

Lecture material in the course is divided into three sections.

  1. The first section includes gametogenesis, fertilization, the development of the embryo from zygote to differentiation of the neural tube and the techniques used to study embryonic development.
  2. The second section covers the development of selected human organ systems and other developmental models.
  3. The third section examines the molecular basis for embryonic patterning and for medically-related topics including stem cells.

Grades for the course are based on the three lecture exams, weekly questions, class participation, and group presentations.

This course satisfies requirements for Biology, EEB, and CMB concentrations.

Required Textbooks: Human Embryology and Developmental Biology, Bruce M. Carlson. Updated version. Elsevier Mosley; and Developmental Biology, Scott F. Gilbert. 8th edition. Sinauer.

Recommended Textbook: Human Embryology, William J. Larsen. 3rd edition. Churchill Livingstone.

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162

BIOLOGY 222 — From Message to Mind: An Introduction to Neurobiology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Hume,Richard I; homepage
Instructor: Demb,Jonathan B

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course will introduce you to key concepts in neurobiology. The first half of the course will focus on the cellular and molecular basis of electrical and synaptic signaling, and on how changes in synaptic signaling are related to learning and memory. The second half of the course will focus on sensory neurobiology. This section of the course will deal with how physical and chemical signals are transduced into electrical signals, and how the synaptic networks of the brain extract useful information from these signals to give rise to conscious perceptions of the outside world. The textbook does an excellent job of explaining current concepts. A major focus of the lectures and discussion sections will be to help you understand the experiments that led to the development of our current views.

This course is particularly appropriate for sophomores considering majoring in one of the biological sciences, as it is a required part of the Neuroscience concentration, and a popular elective in the Biology and Cell and Molecular Biology concentrations.

Textbook: Mark F. Bear, Barry W. Connors, Michael A. Paradiso; Neuroscience: Exploring the Brain, 3rd edition, Lippincott & Wilkins. ISBN 0781760038

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162

BIOLOGY 225 — Principles of Animal Physiology: Lecture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Kennell,Jennifer A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course is an introduction to the physiology of animals. The physiology of both invertebrate and vertebrate animals is covered as well as limited treatment of human physiology as it relates to general physiological mechanisms. The course relies on the comparative method in analyzing physiological systems of diverse taxa to identify general principles of functional mechanisms. The course also considers variations in these mechanisms as related to the requirements of the animals but does not attempt a phylogenetic survey.

The course is intended for concentrators and pre-medical students in their sophomore, junior, or senior years. The subject matter includes metabolism and temperature regulation, nervous and endocrine system controls and integration, respiration and circulation, water and ion balance, excretion, digestion, reproduction, and immune system function. There are three one-hour lectures a week and four one-hour examinations.

Textbook: Biology, 7th edition, Campbell and Reece, ISBN 0-8053-7171-0 (ISBN-13: 9780805371468)

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 and CHEM 210

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Pendergast,Molly Bennette

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Prasad,Neralagadde Subrahmanya

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Marble,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Prasad,Neralagadde Subrahmanya

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Marble,Daniel D

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 006, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Chelvakumar,Meenadchi

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals. Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 007, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Pendergast,Molly Bennette

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 008, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Ard,Kerry Joy

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 009, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Brandt,William D

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 010, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Ard,Kerry Joy

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 011, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Brandt,William D

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 226 — Animal Physiology Laboratory
Section 012, LAB

Instructor: Pavgi, Sushama ; homepage
Instructor: Chelvakumar,Meenadchi

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

This laboratory course provides hands-on experience with physiological systems at the level of organisms and organ systems. Prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 225 is required to take this course. The laboratory meets for one four-hour session a week. Students perform experiments in small groups, collate class data, and perform analyses. Students should be aware that this course uses live animals.

Each student is expected to lead one or more summary presentations at the beginning of the laboratory session following the conclusion of a previous laboratory exercise. The presentations will be 10-15 minutes in length and cover the analyses and summary of the data as well as provide conclusions and implications. Following the presentation, all students will be expected to contribute to the discussion. A term paper, an oral presentation, and other short assignments are required during the term.

Laboratory Exercises in Animal Physiology, BIOLOGY 226, Current Term, edited by Dr. Sushama Pavgi, is required for the course. It is available at Dollar Bill Copying, located at 611 Church Street (off South University Avenue).

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 225

BIOLOGY 281 — General Ecology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Zak,Donald R; homepage
Instructor: King,Aaron Alan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in EEB 381.

The course introduces the basic concepts and principles of ecology as applied to the study of individuals, populations, and communities of both plants and animals. Course topics include the roles of physical and biotic factors influencing the distribution and abundance of organisms; the dynamics of population growth; species interactions including competition, predation, mutualism; the structure of ecological communities; ecological succession; and applications of ecology to problems of environment and resource management. BIOLOGY 281 is a suitable prerequisite for intermediate and advanced courses in ecology.

There will be lectures and discussions. Three exams will constitute the main basis of evaluation.

Textbook: Elements of Ecology, Smith and Smith. 6th edition.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162 and a laboratory course in Chemistry

BIOLOGY 305 — Genetics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Csankovszki,Gyorgyi
Instructor: Wittkopp,Patricia Jean

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Open to students concentrating in the natural sciences or intending to apply for graduate or professional study in basic or applied biology. This introduction to genetics includes the following sections: DNA and chromosomes; gene transmission in eukaryotes; linkage and recombination; genes and enzymes, the genetic code, and mutation; recombinant DNA, RFLP mapping, the Human Genome Project; gene regulation, transposons; population genetics; and quantitative genetics.

There are three hours of lecture each week and one discussion section directed by GSIs. The discussion sections expand on and review lecture material, and discuss problem assignments. Grading is based on three term exams and a final covering lectures, discussions, and reading assignments. Exams include new problems that test applications of basic concepts and genetic techniques. A practice problem set is available and is covered in discussion sections or the Genetics Study Center.

Textbook: Genetics: From Gene to Genome, L. Hartwell, et al. 2nd edition.

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 210.

BIOLOGY 310 — Introductory Biochemistry
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Balazovich,Kenneth J; homepage
Instructor: Jakob,Ursula H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in BIOLOGY 311, BIOLCHEM 415, or CHEM 451.

This course gives an introduction into the world of biological chemistry. The course starts out with the molecular design of life — an introduction to proteins, nucleic acids, carbohydrates and lipids. These molecules will then be put into context when bioenergetics and metabolism will be discussed. The students will also learn how cells transcribe DNA and translate RNA into polypeptides, how polypeptides adopt their specific three-dimensional structure to become proteins, and how proteins then fulfill their individual functions in enzyme catalyzed reactions, assist in the formation and function of membranes, and other important cellular processes. The major metabolic pathways will also be introduced. Other topics that will be discussed include biosignaling and hormone action. The students will learn how to apply bioinformatics to obtain useful information about these molecules using databases and will obtain valuable knowledge about state of the art biochemical and molecular biology techniques.

Once per week there will be a discussion session in addition to the lecture. Here, lecture material can be clarified, study guide questions will be discussed, and quizzes will be given.

Grades in this course are based on the performance in discussion session, projects, and three in-class exams (no final exam is offered).

Textbook: Lehninger's Principles of Biochemistry, Nelson and Cox. 4th edition.

Enforced Prerequisites: BIOLOGY 162 and CHEM 210.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 215

BIOLOGY 390 — Evolution
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Kondrashov,Alexey

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS

This lecture/discussion course covers the fundamentals of evolutionary biology through an examination of its conceptual framework, classical studies, and current research topics. It includes an historical survey of evolutionary thought from classical times to the present and critical examination of such topics as natural selection, adaptation, population genetics, speciation, phylogenetics, macroevolution, evolution of development, and molecular evolution.

Weekly discussions will focus on primary literature. Writing assignments and examinations will be given to assess students' knowledge of course material.

Textbook: Evolution, D.J. Futuyma. (Sinauer, 2005).

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 162; prior or concurrent enrollment in BIOLOGY 305.

BIOLOGY 541 — Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Mahoney,Megan Marie; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4

Every Winter Term, the Reproductive Science Program offers a course in Mammalian Reproductive Endocrinology (MRE 541) which is part of the curriculum of three departments (Cell and Developmental Biology, Biology, Physiology and Psychology). This is a four-credit course for graduate and upper level undergraduate students.

Mammal Reproductive Endocrinology: A study of the physiological and behavior actions for reproductive hormones, which are responsible for the regulation of the reproductive systems and behavior. Topics include: The properties and mechanisms of action of pituitary gonadotropin and sex steroid hormones, the anatomy and endocrine regulation of the reproductive tracts (reproductive & maternal behavior), mechanisms of fertilization, implantation and development, the (neuro) endocrinology of mating and maternal behavior, pregnancy, and contraception.

Advisory Prerequisite: BIOLOGY 310 or 311, or BIOLCHEM 415.

BIOLOGY 630 — Genetics Short Course
Section 001, LEC
Sensory Genetics. MINI-COURSE meets March 21st & March 30th; April 4th & April 11th. (Drop/Add deadline=APR. 2).

Instructor: Meisler,Miriam H; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: Minicourse

Each semester the CMB Program offers a "Short Course" entitled Advanced Topics in Molecular Biology. The course is a mini-symposium composed of a series of 4-5 presentations over several weeks on a specific thematic topic. The topic and speakers are selected by CMB student volunteers. Leading investigators in the field are invited by students to visit the University as symposium speakers. These courses enable students to obtain intensive exposure to high-profile research areas, and to have opportunities to interact with the speakers in multiple contexts, including formal discussions, informal meals, chalk talks, and one-to-one meetings (particularly if they are hosting the speaker). Such interactions have helped some senior CMB students find excellent postdoctoral labs.

The sessions are open to the University community, and attract large audiences who attend for updates on state-of-the-art research.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

BIOLOGY 631 — Genetic Program Student Seminar
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Moran,John V; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Selected topics in human genetics, presentations by students.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 33 of 33