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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = CHEM
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 124 of 124
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CHEM 105 — Our Changing Atmosphere
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Penner,Joyce E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course considers the science needed to understand human-induced threats to the atmospheric environment, with special emphasis on the global changes that are taking place, or are anticipated. We will discuss the greenhouse effect (and its impact on climate), ozone depletion, the polar ozone holes, and urban air pollution. Some basic meteorology will be presented, including how climate changes might affect the frequency and severity of hurricanes and tornadoes. Students will have access to real-time weather information via computer. This lecture course is intended for non-science concentrators, and there are no prerequisites. Grades will be based on three one-hour exams (no final exam) and homework.

CHEM 109 — Natural Science: Bridging the Gaps
Section 001, LEC

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

An interdisciplinary, team-taught introduction to the scientific method, involving subject matter from physics, chemistry, astronomy, geology, biology, and ethics. Demonstrations provide nearly hands-on experience with relevant phenomena.

CHEM 125 — General Chemistry Laboratory I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Kerner,Nancy Konigsberg

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, CHEM 130. It is intended that students planning to enroll in CHEM 130 who have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in CHEM 125 and CHEM 126. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform, and interpret experiments. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The goal is to provide students both with a more accurate picture of the scientific process and also with skills that are relevant to solving real life problems. Much of the course work is done as a member of a team. Student groups each explore the same problem with each group using different reagents and/or conditions. A networked computer system is used to collect, pool, and summarize the largely qualitative class data. Student groups address questions which require them to organize the class data using commercial graphing software. Group answers are presented in discussion. The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to each multi-period project laboratory. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics and problems that will be investigated in the laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory where team data are shared, analyzed, and evaluated. The third begins in the first hour following completion of each multi-period project lab where groups communicate their findings during a student-led discussion. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 30% of the grade. The remaining 70% of the grade is based on the points acquired in laboratory and discussion.

NOTE: Section 100 — Students must also elect one 100 level dis/lab combination and a matching Chem 126 lecture. Combinations are made in consecutive order and are linked. For example: CHEM 125.110 DIS section and CHEM 125.111 LAB section and CHEM 126.100 LEC.

Section 200 — Students must also elect one 200 level DIS/LAB combination and a matching CHEM 126 lecture. For example: CHEM 125.250 DIS section and CHEM 125.251 LAB section and CHEM 126.200 LEC.

Advisory Prerequisite: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 126.

CHEM 125 — General Chemistry Laboratory I
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Kerner,Nancy Konigsberg

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, CHEM 130. It is intended that students planning to enroll in CHEM 130 who have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in CHEM 125 and CHEM 126. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform, and interpret experiments. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The goal is to provide students both with a more accurate picture of the scientific process and also with skills that are relevant to solving real life problems. Much of the course work is done as a member of a team. Student groups each explore the same problem with each group using different reagents and/or conditions. A networked computer system is used to collect, pool, and summarize the largely qualitative class data. Student groups address questions which require them to organize the class data using commercial graphing software. Group answers are presented in discussion. The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to each multi-period project laboratory. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics and problems that will be investigated in the laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory where team data are shared, analyzed, and evaluated. The third begins in the first hour following completion of each multi-period project lab where groups communicate their findings during a student-led discussion. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 30% of the grade. The remaining 70% of the grade is based on the points acquired in laboratory and discussion.

NOTE: Section 100 — Students must also elect one 100 level dis/lab combination and a matching Chem 126 lecture. Combinations are made in consecutive order and are linked. For example: CHEM 125.110 DIS section and CHEM 125.111 LAB section and CHEM 126.100 LEC.

Section 200 — Students must also elect one 200 level DIS/LAB combination and a matching CHEM 126 lecture. For example: CHEM 125.250 DIS section and CHEM 125.251 LAB section and CHEM 126.200 LEC.

Advisory Prerequisite: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 126.

CHEM 126 — General Chemistry Laboratory II
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Kerner,Nancy Konigsberg
Instructor: Walker,Natalie Rose
Instructor: Horvath,Thomas D
Instructor: Wang,Meng
Instructor: Joseph,Michael David
Instructor: Jennings,Colin
Instructor: Ross,Matthew Ryan
Instructor: Casiano,Anette
Instructor: Zhou,Wen
Instructor: Raghavan,Mekhala
Instructor: McCanne,Robert William
Instructor: Avery,Christopher William
Instructor: Nguyen,Khoi Tan
Instructor: Agayan,Rodney Ray
Instructor: Sun,Xiaoyan
Instructor: Kong,Yibing
Instructor: Guo,Meng

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, CHEM 130. It is intended that students planning to enroll in CHEM 130 who have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in CHEM 125 and CHEM 126. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform and interpret experiments. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The goal is to provide students both with a more accurate picture of the scientific process and also with skills that are relevant to solving real life problems. Much of the course work is done as a member of a team. Student groups each explore the same problem with each group using different reagents and/or conditions. A networked computer system is used to collect, pool and summarize the largely qualitative class data. Student groups address questions which require them to organize the class data using commercial graphing software. Group answers are presented in discussion. The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to each multi-period project laboratory. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics and problems that will be investigated in the laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory where team data are shared, analyzed, and evaluated. The third begins in the first hour following completion of each multi-period project lab where groups communicate their findings during a student-led discussion. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 30% of the grade. The remaining 70% of the grade is based on the points acquired in laboratory and discussion.

NOTE: Section 100 — Students must also elect one 100 level dis/lab combination of CHEM 125. Combinations are made in consecutive order and are linked. For example: CHEM 125.110 DIS section and CHEM 125.111 LAB section.

Section 200 — Students must also elect one 200 level DIS/LAB combination of CHEM 125. For example: CHEM 125.250 DIS section and CHEM 125.251 LAB section.

Advisory Prerequisite: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 125.

CHEM 126 — General Chemistry Laboratory II
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Kerner,Nancy Konigsberg
Instructor: Walker,Natalie Rose
Instructor: Horvath,Thomas D
Instructor: Wang,Meng
Instructor: Joseph,Michael David
Instructor: Jennings,Colin
Instructor: Ross,Matthew Ryan
Instructor: Casiano,Anette
Instructor: Zhou,Wen
Instructor: Raghavan,Mekhala
Instructor: McCanne,Robert William
Instructor: Avery,Christopher William
Instructor: Nguyen,Khoi Tan
Instructor: Agayan,Rodney Ray
Instructor: Sun,Xiaoyan
Instructor: Kong,Yibing
Instructor: Guo,Meng

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

This laboratory course can be elected with, or following, CHEM 130. It is intended that students planning to enroll in CHEM 130 who have had little or no previous chemistry laboratory enroll concurrently in CHEM 125 and CHEM 126. The focus of this guided inquiry laboratory is to foster critical thinking that allows students to design, perform and interpret experiments. In addition, the student acquires technical skills that are required for further advancement in experimental sciences. Although an ability to collect and analyze data in a quantitative manner is developed, the emphasis of the course is to provide a qualitative understanding of the basic concepts of chemistry. This is accomplished by demonstrating that chemical principles are derived from experimental data. The goal is to provide students both with a more accurate picture of the scientific process and also with skills that are relevant to solving real life problems. Much of the course work is done as a member of a team. Student groups each explore the same problem with each group using different reagents and/or conditions. A networked computer system is used to collect, pool and summarize the largely qualitative class data. Student groups address questions which require them to organize the class data using commercial graphing software. Group answers are presented in discussion. The format of the course is organized into three sections. Pre-laboratory reading and questions are completed prior to each multi-period project laboratory. A one-hour lecture provides support for the topics and problems that will be investigated in the laboratory. The second component is performance in the laboratory where team data are shared, analyzed, and evaluated. The third begins in the first hour following completion of each multi-period project lab where groups communicate their findings during a student-led discussion. There are two one-hour written examinations, scheduled for Tuesday evenings, that constitute 30% of the grade. The remaining 70% of the grade is based on the points acquired in laboratory and discussion.

NOTE: Section 100 — Students must also elect one 100 level dis/lab combination of CHEM 125. Combinations are made in consecutive order and are linked. For example: CHEM 125.110 DIS section and CHEM 125.111 LAB section.

Section 200 — Students must also elect one 200 level DIS/LAB combination of CHEM 125. For example: CHEM 125.250 DIS section and CHEM 125.251 LAB section.

Advisory Prerequisite: To be elected by students who are eligible for (or enrolled in) CHEM 130, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 125.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann
Instructor: Perrine,Trilisa M

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 130 — General Chemistry: Macroscopic Investigations and Reaction Principles
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Sipowska,Jadwiga T
Instructor: Dethoff,Elizabeth Ann

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS, QR/2

Credit Exclusions: Intended for students without AP credit in Chemistry.

This General Chemistry course is intended to satisfy the one-term chemistry requirement for students interested in science, or as a natural science elective for non-science concentrators. This course may also be used as the first term in a four or more term chemistry sequence (probably CHEM 130, 210/211, 215/216, 260/241/242, etc.) for science concentrators and pre-professional students.

CHEM 130 provides an introduction to the major concepts of chemistry, including the microscopic picture of atomic and molecular structure, periodic trends in the chemical reactivity, the energetics of chemical reactions, and the nature of chemical equilibria. Students will be introduced to the fundamental principles of modern chemistry, the descriptive chemistry of the elements, and to the underlying theories that account for observed macroscopic behavior. In CHEM 130, students will learn to think critically, examine experimental data, and form generalizations about data as chemists do. CHEM 130 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty (the intensive section will have four lectures a week), and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and graduate student instructors will have scheduled office hours for after-class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from discussion class evaluation, three one-hour examinations (Tuesday nights), and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: Three years of high school math or MATH 105; one year of high school chemistry recommended. Placement by testing, or permission of Chemistry department.

CHEM 210 — Structure and Reactivity I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Nolta,Kathleen V

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students, and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a graduate student instructor per week. There are three hour examinations and a final examination.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 211. The recitation sections for CHEM 210 and the corresponding laboratory sections for CHEM 211 are listed together in the University Online Schedule of Classes under CHEM 210. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

Advisory Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211.

CHEM 210 — Structure and Reactivity I
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Brennan,Brian Buerk
Instructor: Nolta,Kathleen V

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 210 is the first course in a two-term sequence in which the major concepts of chemistry are introduced in the context of organic chemistry. Emphasis is on the development of the capacity of students to think about the relationship between structure and reactivity and to solve problems in a qualitatively analytical way. This course is a particularly good first course for students with AP credit in chemistry, Honors students, and other students with a strong interest in chemistry and biology. The course has three lectures with the professor and one hour of discussion with a graduate student instructor per week. There are Thursday evening workshops with the professors from 5:30-7:30 in 1210 Chemistry. There are three hour examinations (Tuesday nights) and a final examination.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 211. The recitation sections for CHEM 210 and the corresponding laboratory sections for CHEM 211 are listed together in the University Online Schedule of Classes under CHEM 210. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

Advisory Prerequisite: High school chemistry. Placement by examination during Orientation. To be taken with CHEM 211.

CHEM 211 — Investigations in Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Nolta,Kathleen V

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 211 is a laboratory introduction to methods of investigation in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students solve individual problems using microscale equipment and a variety of techniques such as thin layer chromatography, titrations, and spectroscopy. The course consists of a four-hour laboratory period with a teaching assistant under the supervision of the professor. Students keep laboratory notebooks, which also serve as laboratory reports. Grades are based on performance in the laboratory and the laboratory notebooks.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 210. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

Advisory Prerequisite: To be taken with CHEM 210.

CHEM 211 — Investigations in Chemistry
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Nolta,Kathleen V

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 211 is a laboratory introduction to methods of investigation in inorganic and organic chemistry. Students solve individual problems using microscale equipment and a variety of techniques such as thin layer chromatography, titrations, and spectroscopy. The course consists of a four-hour laboratory period with a teaching assistant under the supervision of the professor. Students keep laboratory notebooks, which also serve as laboratory reports. Grades are based on performance in the laboratory and the laboratory notebooks.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 210. Students must elect both CHEM 210 (for 4 credits) and CHEM 211 (for 1 credit).

Advisory Prerequisite: To be taken with CHEM 210.

CHEM 215 — Structure and Reactivity II
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gottfried,Amy C
Instructor: Coppola,Brian P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Exams: TUES, JAN 30, MAR 6 & APR 3, 6-8PM

TEXT: Chemistry: Structure & Reactivity, Ege, Houghton Mifflin
Structure & Reactivity Coursepack, Coppola, Hayden McNeil

CHEM 215 continues the study of organic chemistry started in CHEM 210. A functional group approach is used, centering on the carbonyl group. The chemistry of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives are treated in detail. The course has three examinations and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216.

CHEM 215 — Structure and Reactivity II
Section 200, LEC
HONORS

Instructor: Koreeda,Masato

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Honors

Exams: TUES, JAN 30, FEB 20 & MAR 27, 6-8PM

TEXT: NO TEXT IS REQUIRED FOR THE HONORS SECTION OF THIS COURSE

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216.

CHEM 215 — Structure and Reactivity II
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Coppola,Brian P; homepage
Instructor: Gottfried,Amy C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Exams: TUES, JAN 30, MAR 6 & APR 3, 6-8PM

TEXT: Chemistry: Structure & Reactivity, Ege, Houghton Mifflin
Structure & Reactivity Coursepack, Coppola, Hayden McNeil

CHEM 215 continues the study of organic chemistry started in CHEM 210. A functional group approach is used, centering on the carbonyl group. The chemistry of aldehydes, ketones, carboxylic acids and their derivatives are treated in detail. The course has three examinations and a final examination.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216.

CHEM 215 — Structure and Reactivity II
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Frazee,Richard W
Instructor: Coppola,Brian P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Exams: TUES, JAN 30, MAR 6 & APR 3, 6-8PM

TEXT: Chemistry: Structure & Reactivity, Ege, Houghton Mifflin
Structure & Reactivity Coursepack, Coppola, Hayden McNeil

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. To be taken with CHEM 216.

CHEM 216 — Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Marsh,E Neil G; homepage
Instructor: Karatjas,Andrew G

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

NOTE: Students should elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215.

CHEM 216 — Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds
Section 200, LEC
Honors

Instructor: Koreeda,Masato

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS
Other: Honors

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 215. Students must elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

TEXT: Introduction to Organic Spectroscopy, Harwood & Claridge, ISBN#0-19855-7558, Oxford University Press

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215.

CHEM 216 — Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds
Section 300, LEC

Instructor: Marsh,E Neil G; homepage
Instructor: Karatjas,Andrew G

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

NOTE: Students should elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215.

CHEM 216 — Synthesis and Characterization of Organic Compounds
Section 400, LEC

Instructor: Karatjas,Andrew G
Instructor: Marsh,E Neil G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 216 builds on the experimental approach started in CHEM 211. Students participate in planning exactly what they are going to do in the laboratory by being given general goals and directions that have to be adapted to fit the specific project they will be working on. They use microscale equipment, which requires them to develop manual dexterity and care in working in the laboratory. They also evaluate the results of their experiments by checking for identity and purity using various chromatographic and spectroscopic methods. Students will be expected to keep a laboratory notebook that will serve as the basis for their laboratory reports.

NOTE: Students should elect both CHEM 215 (for 3 credits) and CHEM 216 (for 2 credits).

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 210/211. Must be taken with CHEM 215.

CHEM 218 — Independent Study in Biochemistry
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: INDEPENDENT

This course provides an introduction to independent biochemistry research under the direction of a faculty member whose project is in the biochemistry area. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Chemistry Advising Office, 1500 Chemistry, provides information to help students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. CHEM 218 is for biochemistry concentrators, and research projects must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Exact details such as nature of research, level of involvement of the student, and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in a minimum of three hours per week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted — one for the Advising Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive biochemistry credit for CHEM 218, the student must work on a research project supervised by a member of the biochemistry concentration research faculty, and the project must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the biochemistry research faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. For students with less than junior standing.

CHEM 219 — Independent Study in Chemistry
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Other: INDEPENDENT

Research in an area of interest to, and supervised by, a Chemistry faculty member. The Chemistry Department encourages students to get involved with undergraduate research as early as possible. The Chemistry Advising Office, 1500 Chemistry, provides information and help to students in meeting with faculty members to discuss research opportunities. Exact details such as nature of the research, level of involvement of the student, credits awarded, and criteria for grading are individually determined in consultation with the faculty member. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for a 14-week term for each credit elected. At the end of each term, three copies of a written report are submitted — one for the Advising Office, one for the student, and one for the faculty supervisor.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for CHEM 219, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor. For students with less than junior standing.

CHEM 230 — Physical Chemical Principles and Applications
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sharp,Robert R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260.

This Chemistry course is intended as a fourth term in chemistry for science concentrators and pre-professional students, completing the two-year chemistry sequence required by, for example, the medical, dental, and engineering programs. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

In CHEM 230, students will be introduced to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. These include the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; phase transitions and solutions; electrochemistry and the principles of oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical kinetics and the study of chemical orbitals and chemical bonding; transition metal chemistry and coordination complexes. These topics will be treated from the viewpoint of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of physical chemical principles to chemical behavior in a broad spectrum of settings.

CHEM 230 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from three one-hour examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in Chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

CHEM 230 — Physical Chemical Principles and Applications
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Sharp,Robert R; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted to those who have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260.

This Chemistry course is intended as a fourth term in chemistry for science concentrators and pre-professional students, completing the two-year chemistry sequence required by, for example, the medical, dental, and engineering programs. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

In CHEM 230, students will be introduced to the physical principles underlying some of the major topics of inorganic and analytical chemistry. These include the gaseous, liquid, and solid states of matter; phase transitions and solutions; electrochemistry and the principles of oxidation-reduction reactions; chemical kinetics and the study of chemical orbitals and chemical bonding; transition metal chemistry and coordination complexes. These topics will be treated from the viewpoint of the experimental scientist, with an emphasis on the application of physical chemical principles to chemical behavior in a broad spectrum of settings.

CHEM 230 will meet three times each week in lecture sections with senior faculty and once a week in small group discussion classes led by graduate student instructors. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours for after class help, and computerized study aids will be available to all students. Course grades will be determined from three one-hour examinations.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216. Students who plan to continue beyond a fourth term in Chemistry would typically enroll in CHEM 260/241/242 instead of CHEM 230; credit will not be given for both of these courses.

CHEM 241 — Introduction to Chemical Analysis
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Kennedy,Robert T; homepage
Instructor: Reynolds,Melissa May

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

This course introduces the principles and techniques of modern quantitative chemical analysis. Chemical equilibrium as the basis of analytical techniques will be emphasized. Photometric and potentiometric titrimetry will be discussed to illustrate quantitative chemical measurements. Molecular (UV) and atomic spectroscopy as well as mass spectrometry will be discussed. Fundamental concepts of chemical separations including GC and HPLC will be discussed. Throughout the course the fundamental principles of experiment design, laboratory data systems and statistical evaluation will be stressed.

NOTE:This course is linked to CHEM 242; students are expected to elect both CHEM 241 (2 credits) and CHEM 242 (2 credits) in the same academic term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 242.

CHEM 242 — Introduction to Chemical Analysis Laboratory
Section 100, LAB

Instructor: Meyerhoff,Mark E; homepage
Instructor: Bennett,Jason A

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 242 is the laboratory component of the CHEM 241/242 course sequence. Experiments include studies of equilibria (titration, potentiometry), separations (gas and liquid chromatography), electrochemistry, and spectroscopy (atomic and molecular absorption and emission). Grading is based on laboratory reports.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 241. Students must elect both CHEM 241 (for 2 credits) and CHEM 242 (for 2 credits) in the same term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 241.

CHEM 242 — Introduction to Chemical Analysis Laboratory
Section 200, LAB

Instructor: Meyerhoff,Mark E; homepage
Instructor: Bennett,Jason A

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 242 is the laboratory component of the CHEM 241/242 course sequence. Experiments include studies of equilibria (titration, potentiometry), separations (gas and liquid chromatography), electrochemistry, and spectroscopy (atomic and molecular absorption and emission). Grading is based on laboratory reports.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 241. Students must elect both CHEM 241 (for 2 credits) and CHEM 242 (for 2 credits) in the same term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 241.

CHEM 242 — Introduction to Chemical Analysis Laboratory
Section 300, LAB

Instructor: Meyerhoff,Mark E; homepage
Instructor: Bennett,Jason A

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS, NS

CHEM 242 is the laboratory component of the CHEM 241/242 course sequence. Experiments include studies of equilibria (titration, potentiometry), separations (gas and liquid chromatography), electrochemistry, and spectroscopy (atomic and molecular absorption and emission). Grading is based on laboratory reports.

NOTE: This course is linked to CHEM 241. Students must elect both CHEM 241 (for 2 credits) and CHEM 242 (for 2 credits) in the same term.

Advisory Prerequisite: Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 230 or 260, and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 241.

CHEM 260 — Chemical Principles
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sension,Roseanne J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Introduction to the quantal nature of matter, basic chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Description of the fundamental physical principles that underlie spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160).

CHEM 260 — Chemical Principles
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Penner-Hahn,James E; homepage
Instructor: Pazicni,Samuel Robert

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

Introduction to the quantal nature of matter, basic chemical thermodynamics, and chemical kinetics. Description of the fundamental physical principles that underlie spectroscopic and electrochemical analysis

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160).

CHEM 261 — Introduction to Quantum Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sension,Roseanne J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted for students that have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260.

Introduction to the quantal nature of matter and the basic principles of quantum chemistry. Course meets only for the first third of the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). CHEM 261 is intended primarily for Chemical Engineering students.

CHEM 261 — Introduction to Quantum Chemistry
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Penner-Hahn,James E; homepage
Instructor: Pazicni,Samuel Robert

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Credit Exclusions: No credit granted for students that have completed or are enrolled in CHEM 260.

Introduction to the quantal nature of matter and the basic principles of quantum chemistry. Course meets only for the first third of the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216, MATH 115, and prior or concurrent enrollment in PHYSICS 140 (or 160). CHEM 261 is intended primarily for Chemical Engineering students.

CHEM 302 — Inorganic Chemistry: Principles of Structure, Reactivity, and Function
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Coucouvanis,Dimitri N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS, NS

This course in Inorganic Chemistry is intended to introduce students to the properties of the elements and the compounds that they form. The course should be elected by students concentrating in chemistry, chemical engineering, or cellular and molecular biology.

This course will provide an introduction to the structure and properties of those elements other than carbon. Topics that will be included are the electronic structure of atoms, molecules and extended solids, bonding, periodicity, main group and transition element chemistry, catalysis, and bioinorganic chemistry.

CHEM 302 will meet for one hour, three times each week with a senior faculty member and once a week with a graduate student instructor in groups of approximately 25. Lecturers and GSIs will have scheduled office hours.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 260 (or CHEM 261 and CHEM 330).

CHEM 312 — Synthesis and Characterization
Section 100, REC

Instructor: Ashe III,Arthur J; homepage
Instructor: Pan,Jun

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

CHEM 312 introduces students to advanced techniques used in the synthesis, purification, and characterization of inorganic and organic compounds. It is a course designed to serve as a transition between laboratory and research laboratory work. The course emphasizes methods for handling air-sensitive material such as organometallics compounds, and includes syringe techniques, working under vacuum or inert gas atmospheres, vacuum distillations as well as various chromatographic and spectroscopic techniques. The course meets in two four-hour laboratory periods. Some of that time may be used for discussion of techniques and principles. Grades are based on laboratory performance, written reports, and examinations.

Textbook: "Structure Determination of Organic Compounds", by Pretsch.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215/216. Prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 302.

CHEM 398 — Undergraduate Research in Biochemistry
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Elected starting in the junior or senior year, this course is an optional requirement for Biochemistry students and a requirement for Honors Biochemistry students, who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. The student is expected to put in a minimum of three hours a week of actual work for each credit elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted — one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Chemistry Advising Office (1500 Chemistry), and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for CHEM 398 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in CHEM 218.

For a student to receive biochemistry credit for CHEM 398, the student must work on a research project supervised by a member of the biochemistry concentration research faculty and the project must be approved by a biochemistry advisor. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the biochemistry research faculty member.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing, and permission of a Biochemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research.

CHEM 399 — Undergraduate Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

Elected starting in the junior or senior year, this course is a requirement for B.S. Chemistry students, who must elect it for a total of four credits spread out over two or more terms. The student is expected to put in at least three hours a week of actual work for each credit elected. At the end of each term, a written report evaluating the progress of the project is submitted — one copy to the faculty member, one copy for the Chemistry Advising Office, and one copy for the student. Interim reports need not be lengthy, but the final report for CHEM 399 is expected to be more detailed and longer than the reports in CHEM 219.

For a student to receive Chemistry credit for CHEM 399, the student must work on a research project supervised by a faculty member of the Chemistry Department, either alone, or in collaboration with a colleague within the department, from another department, or from another school. This collaboration must be an ongoing one, and the student must receive direct supervision by all of the faculty who have agreed to sponsor the project. Final evaluation of the research effort and the report, as well as the grade for the course, rests with the faculty member from the Chemistry Department.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing, and permission of a chemistry concentration advisor and the professor who will supervise the research.

CHEM 417 — Dynamical Processes in Biophysics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Meiners,Jens-Christian D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The physical basis of diffusive processes in biology and biochemistry, and optical spectroscopic means for measuring its rates. Topics include: membrane electrical potentials, nerve impulses, synaptic transmission, the physics of chemoreception by cells, motion and reaction kinetics of membrane components, optical microscopy, visible and UV light absorption, fluorescence and phosphorescence, quasielastic light scattering, mathematics of random fluctuations, and chaotic processes in biology.

Enforced Prerequisites: MATH 216 or 256 or 286 or 316, and PHYSICS 340 or CHEM 463

CHEM 420 — Intermediate Organic Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Mapp,Anna K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

An exploration of selected topics in organic chemistry that builds on the basic concepts of structure and reactivity considered in the first courses in organic chemistry.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 215 and 216 or their equivalents.

CHEM 436 — Polymer Synthesis and Characterization
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Banaszak Holl,Mark M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

A lecture and laboratory course that introduces students to the special techniques used to study macromolecules.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 260.

CHEM 447 — Physical Methods of Analysis
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Morris,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Theory and applicability of the principal physical and physiochemical approaches used in instrumental chemical analysis, including electrical, optical, and separation methods.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM,CHEM 260 and 241/242, or 340.

CHEM 452 — Introduction to Biochemistry II
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Ninfa,Alexander J
Instructor: Lei,Ming
Instructor: Kerppola,Tom K W

WN 2007
Credits: 4

CHEM 452 is the second of a two-term introduction to modern biochemistry. The course focuses on the chemical basis underlying a host of cellular events involving macromolecules such as proteins, nucleic acids, lipids, and glycoconjugates, in addition to small molecules such as vitamins, amino acids and carbohydrates.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 451.

CHEM 454 — Biophysical Chemistry II: Macromolecular Structure and Dynamics
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Walter,Nils G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course builds on the CHEM 451-453 sequence and aims at providing an understanding of the structure and dynamics of biological macromolecules. After introducing the necessary nomenclature and reviewing thermodynamic principles, modern techniques to characterize the structure and dynamics of biopolymers is the focus. Sedimentation, electrophoresis, mass spectrometry, X-ray diffraction, scattering, and spectroscopic techniques such as absorption, circular dichroism, fluorescence, and NMR are covered. Both physical principles and practical applications in the Life Sciences are highlighted.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 453 or 463, and CHEM 451/452 or equivalent.

CHEM 461 — Physical Chemistry I
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Dunietz,Barry Dov; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This section is designed to introduce students to a more thorough, research-oriented view of Physical Chemistry. Required for Honors Chemistry concentrators.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence CHEM 260/461/463. CHEM 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in CHEM 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3 dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 462, 1 credit) in the same term that CHEM 461 is taken.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM,CHEM 260 or 340. PHYSICS 240, and MATH 215. No credit granted to those who have completed CHEM 397 or 469.

CHEM 462 — Computational Chemistry Laboratory
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Kubarych,Kevin Joel

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in CHEM 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the first term of Physical Chemistry (CHEM 461, 3 credits) in the same term that CHEM 462 is taken.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 461.

CHEM 462 — Computational Chemistry Laboratory
Section 200, LEC

Instructor: Kubarych,Kevin Joel

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

This course introduces modern computational tools for symbolic mathematics and for graphical display (Mathematica and Maple). Examples are given of the use of these tools for solving problems in quantum mechanics and quantum chemistry, including exploration of the functional forms of wave functions, solutions of simple differential equations, and diagonalization of Hamiltonians. Molecular modeling software (HyperChem and CAChe) is introduced and used to perform both ab initio and semi-empirical quantum chemical calculations. The examples used are taken largely from the topics discussed in CHEM 461.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the first term of Physical Chemistry (CHEM 461, 3 credits) in the same term that CHEM 462 is taken.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 215, and prior or concurrent enrollment in CHEM 461.

CHEM 463 — Physical Chemistry II
Section 200, LEC
HONORS .

Instructor: Gland,John L; homepage
Instructor: Karabiyik,Mehmet

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors

This is the third of a three term sequence in physical chemistry and focuses on thermodynamics and kinetics. Both classical thermodynamics (entropy, phase and chemical equilibria) and statistical thermodynamics are discussed. Fundamental theories underlying chemical kinetics are discussed and solid state structures are introduced.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 461/462.

CHEM 467 — Biogeochemical Cycles
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Carroll,Mary Anne; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Biogeochemical cycles describe how carbon, nitrogen, sulfur, and other elements cycle through not only the atmosphere, the oceans, and the landmasses of the earth. This course is useful to students in many fields including engineering, atmospheric science, chemistry, biology, geology, natural resources, and public health. The biogeochemical cycles of water, carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur; the atmosphere and oceans as reservoirs and reaction media; the fate of natural and human-made sources of carbon, nitrogen, and sulfur compounds; the interactions among major biogeochemical cycles and resultant global change: greenhouse gases, acid rain, and ozone depletion.

TEXT: Global Environment: Water, Air, and Geochemical Cycles, Berner and Berner, Prentice-Hall, 1996.

Advisory Prerequisite: MATH 116, CHEM 210, and PHYSICS 240 (or 260).

CHEM 480 — Physical and Instrumental Chemistry
Section 100, LAB

Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage
Instructor: Kieltyka,Jason Walter

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

A laboratory exploration of methods for the measurement of physical and spectroscopic properties of substances and the application of these methods in instrumental analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 447 and 461/462; and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 463.

CHEM 480 — Physical and Instrumental Chemistry
Section 200, LAB

Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage
Instructor: Kieltyka,Jason Walter

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

A laboratory exploration of methods for the measurement of physical and spectroscopic properties of substances and the application of these methods in instrumental analysis.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 447 and 461/462; and concurrent enrollment in CHEM 463.

CHEM 485 — Projects Laboratory
Section 100, LAB

Instructor: Ashe III,Arthur J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

A project-oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 480.

CHEM 485 — Projects Laboratory
Section 400, LAB

Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage
Instructor: Kieltyka,Jason Walter

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

A project-oriented laboratory in which students work on one or two projects in depth during the term.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 480.

CHEM 495 — Professional Development in the Chemical Sciences
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Gland,John L; homepage
Instructor: Roll,Mark Francis

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: ULWR, BS

A "studio" format course for students in the chemical sciences wishing to enhance their writing, speaking, and analysis skills. The course includes critical analysis and proficiency of written and oral communication and an introduction to the multi-faceted features of professional life.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 461.

CHEM 498 — Undergraduate Honors Thesis in Biochemistry
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

To be elected in the term in which an Honors biochemistry student presents a thesis on undergraduate research.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 398 and permission of instructor.

CHEM 499 — Undergraduate Thesis
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS
Other: INDEPENDENT

To be elected in the term in which an Honors chemistry student presents a thesis on undergraduate research.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 399 and permission of instructor.

CHEM 502 — Chemical Biology II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Mapp,Anna K; homepage
Instructor: Gestwicki,Jason Edward
Instructor: Smith,William L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course is a continuation of CHEMBIO 501. The basic concepts obtained in CHEMBIO 501 will be applied to and demonstrated in three broad areas of interest to both chemists and biologists. The first topic will discuss combinatorial methods including SELEX and gene shuffling, combinatorial organic synthesis, high throughput screening and chemical genetics. The second topic will focus on signal transduction, emphasizing general concepts (at the molecular level) and how small molecules have been used to probe and modulate signal transduction pathways. The final topic will cover protein translation, stressing mechanistic aspects of protein synthesis and folding in vivo.

CHEM 515 — Organometallic Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Sanford,Melanie S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Systematic consideration of modern aspects of organometallic chemistry including main group and transition metal complexes. The structure and bonding in organometallic compounds are covered. Particular emphasis is placed on applications of homogeneous organometallic catalysis in polymer synthesis, industrial processes, and synthetic organic chemistry.

CHEM 521 — Biophysical Chemistry II
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Zand,Robert; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This course is team-taught and is the second of a two-term biophysical chemistry series, BIOPHYS 520/521, but it can be taken as a stand-alone course. BIOPHYS 521 provides an overview of the theory and application of spectroscopical techniques of UV/Vis, IR, Fluorescence, Single Molecule Detection, CD, and NMR. Other topics covered include X-ray crystallography, computational methods, light scattering, ultracentrifugation. When possible, hands-on opportunities in applying some of these techniques will be offered.

Textbooks:
"Biophysical Chemistry", part 1, Canton, 0716711885, publ
Freeman "Biophysical Chemistry", part 2, Canton, 0716711923, publ
Freeman "Proteins", Creighton, 0716732688, publ Freeman

Advisory Prerequisite: PHYSICS,CHEM 461/430 or equivalent, BIOLCHEM 415, permission of instructor

CHEM 536 — Laboratory in Macromolecular Chemistry
Section 100, LAB

Instructor: Banaszak Holl,Mark M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Reqs: BS

Experimental methods for the study of macromolecular materials in solution and in the bulk state.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 535 or PHYSICS 418 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 538 — Organic Chemistry of Macromolecules
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Matzger,Adam J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

The preparation, reactions, and properties of high molecular weight polymeric materials of both natural and synthetic origin.

Advisory Prerequisite: MACROMOL,CHEM 215/216, and CHEM 230 or 260 or 340.

CHEM 541 — Advanced Organic Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Vedejs,Edwin; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Synthetic organic chemistry. The scope and limitations of the more important synthetic reactions are discussed within the framework of multistep organic synthesis.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 540.

CHEM 542 — Applications of Physical Methods to Organic Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Montgomery,John

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Applications of infrared, ultraviolet and nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy, optical rotary dispersion, mass spectrometry and other physical methods to the study of the structure and reactions of organic compounds.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 260, 241/242, and 312.

CHEM 548 — New Frontiers at the Chemistry/Biology Interface
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: O'Brien,Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 1
Reqs: BS

Students attend seminars that describe topics at the frontiers of Chemistry and Biology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor

CHEM 570 — Molecular Physical Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Dunietz,Barry Dov; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

This section is designed to introduce students to a more thorough, research-oriented view of Physical Chemistry. Required for Honors Chemistry concentrators.

This is the second of the three-term physical chemistry sequence CHEM 260/461/463. CHEM 461 builds on the introduction to quantum mechanics that was given in CHEM 260. Students will use the Schrödinger Equation in 1-, 2-, and 3 dimensions to solve exactly a series of important chemical problems including the harmonic oscillator, the rigid rotor, and the hydrogen atom. Group theory is introduced as an aid for understanding spectroscopic selection rules. Advanced spectroscopy, including transition probabilities, normal vibrational modes, and photoelectron spectroscopies are introduced and then used to deduce molecular structure. The valence-bond and molecular orbital theories of chemical bonding are discussed, and methods for performing quantum chemical calculations, including variational and perturbation methods, are introduced. The quantum mechanics of spin and angular momentum are discussed and used to interpret magnetic resonance spectra.

NOTE: Students are strongly encouraged to elect the Computational Chemistry Laboratory (CHEM 462, 1 credit) in the same term that CHEM 461 is taken.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM,CHEM 469 or equivalent.

CHEM 575 — Chemical Thermodynamics
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Gland,John L; homepage
Instructor: Karabiyik,Mehmet

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

A discussion of chemical phase equilibria, the treatment of solutions, and chemical reactions by classical thermodynamics. The applications of electrochemical cells in studying chemical reactivities, utilization of molecular and atomic spectra in statistico-mechanical calculations as well as a brief treatment of non-equilibrium thermodynamics are usually included.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM,CHEM 468 and 469 or equivalent.

CHEM 576 — Statistical Mechanics
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Kopelman,Raoul; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Constitutes with CHEM 571 a full course for students specializing in physical chemistry. The foundation of equilibrium statistical mechanics and applications to problems of chemical interest. Included are discussions of imperfect gases and liquids, mixtures, solids, quantum statistics, surface chemistry and polymers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CHEM 580 — Molecular Spectra and Structure
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Geva,Eitan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: BS

Review of atomic spectra; rotational, vibration-rotation and electronic spectra of diatomic and simple polyatomic molecules; and deduction of molecular parameters from spectra.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 570 or permission of instructor.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 001, LAB

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Sanford,Melanie S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 008, LAB

Instructor: Fierke,Carol A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 010, LAB

Instructor: Penner-Hahn,James E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 014, LAB

Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 015, LAB

Instructor: Kopelman,Raoul; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 017, LAB

Instructor: Lehnert,Nicolai

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 018, LAB

Instructor: Pecoraro,Vincent L; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 020, LAB

Instructor: Yaghi,Omar M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 022, LAB

Instructor: Koreeda,Masato

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 023, LAB

Instructor: Carroll,Kate S

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 024, LAB

Instructor: Banaszak Holl,Mark M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 025, LAB

Instructor: Morris,Michael D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 026, LAB

Instructor: Walter,Nils G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 027, LAB

Instructor: Lubman,David M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 035, LAB

Instructor: Coucouvanis,Dimitri N; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 036, LAB

Instructor: Geva,Eitan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 037, LAB

Instructor: Chen,Zhan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 038, LAB

Instructor: Mapp,Anna K; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 039, LAB

Instructor: Matzger,Adam J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 042, LAB

Instructor: Meyerhoff,Mark E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 045, LAB

Instructor: Sension,Roseanne J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 046, LAB

Instructor: Zellers,Edward T

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 050, LAB

Instructor: Johnson,Marc J A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 051, LAB

Instructor: Al-Hashimi,Hashim M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 052, LAB

Instructor: Kennedy,Robert T; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 053, LAB

Instructor: Wolfe,John P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 054, LAB

Instructor: Woodard,Ronald W; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 059, LAB

Instructor: Marsh,E Neil G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 062, LAB

Instructor: Ramamoorthy,Ayyalusamy; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 065, LAB

Instructor: Carlson,Heather A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 094, LAB

Instructor: Vedejs,Edwin; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 095, LAB

Instructor: Glick,Gary D; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 196, LAB

Instructor: Andricioaei,Ioan; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 198, LAB

Instructor: Dunietz,Barry Dov; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 199, LAB

Instructor: Goodson III,Theodore G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 202, LAB

Instructor: Montgomery,John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 597 — Introduction to Graduate Research
Section 203, LAB

Instructor: Kubarych,Kevin Joel

WN 2007
Credits: 3

All Chemistry Ph.D. students are required to take a first-year graduate research course both Fall and Winter Academic Terms. This course consists of practical hands-on experience in a faculty's lab. Students receive training in research methods and techniques necessary for the successful conduct of dissertation research as the new curriculum changes require.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 598 — IGERT Res Rotation
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this program, we are seeking to bring together disciplines that are concerned with materials on a scale from the nanoscopic to the microscopic. These length scales for materials bridge the gap between the molecular (chemical) and the micron scale of devices. Chemists are increasingly concerned with complex "supramolecular" arrays, whereas the electronics engineers strive to decrease the sizes of their devices to molecular dimensions. The length scales associated with these disciplines are converging. Unfortunately, the language and laboratory skills that have evolved at the two extremes are quite different, making communication difficult. We envision a program that brings together these disciplines, creates a common language, and will produce a new generation of students skilled in molecularly designed materials. The course helps students establish "critical literacy" in areas outside their core expertise is our proposed research group rotation (RGR). In the RGR, a student will select 3 research mentors with whom three, short-term research projects will be carried out. Each project will include a definition of the problem, a literature search, some laboratory work, and a final written report The student must interview a minimum of 5 prospective research mentors before choosing the three RGR mentors. The RGR student will take part in the full life of the host research laboratory, including participating in all group meetings, seminar activities, etc. of the host laboratory/department. At least one of the three research rotations must be outside the students home department and may include a summer term at a participating industrial or government laboratory.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 599 — Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program Research Rotation
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The Chemistry Biology Interface (CBI) Training Program, a unique multidisciplinary Ph.D. training program, focuses on the fundamental underlying chemical principles that govern all biological processes. This dynamic new program emphasizes mechanistic and synthetic aspects of research at the chemistry biology interface and leads to a Ph.D. degree in either Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, or Medicinal Chemistry. Students enrolled in the program will gain a broad appreciation of the chemical foundations of biology including synthesis, analysis, and theory and will be prepared to pursue research on a vast array of critical biological problems in academic or industrial settings. Three different University of Michigan departments — Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Medicinal Chemistry — have combined strengths to create this challenging new program. Each student's course of study is tailored to suit his or her individual goals and includes laboratory rotations in at least two of the participating University departments. To learn more about research in an industrial setting, students will also be encouraged to perform a rotation at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories adjacent to the University's North Campus. The CBI Training Program offers students the unique opportunity to participate in laboratory rotations at the Parke-Davis Research Laboratories in the following areas:

  1. Medicinal chemistry
  2. Peptides
  3. Structure-based design chemistry
  4. Exploratory chemistry
  5. Computational chemistry
  6. Molecular modeling
  7. Bioorganic chemistry
  8. Structural biology
  9. Analytical research
  10. Combinatorial chemistry
  11. Automated chemical synthesis

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 616 — Advanced Inorganic Chemistry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Johnson,Marc J A; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The application of theoretical principles to the experimental observations of modern inorganic chemistry: ligand field and molecular orbital theory of complex ions, structural chemistry, magnetic properties, ESR, Mossbauer spectra, NQR.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM 507 and 570. Graduate standing.

CHEM 647 — Mass Spectrometry
Section 100, LEC

Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course is focused on gaining a deep understanding of the physical principles of this technique, including generation and measurement of high vacuum, sample introduction systems, ionization methods, ion optics, mass analysis, ion detection, electronics, and data processing. Methods for tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments are also discussed in detail, including collision induced dissociation, surface induced dissociation, photo dissociation, and techniques involving radical ion chemistry, e.g., electron capture and transfer dissociation, as well a implementation of MS/MS on various mass analyzers.

Advisory Prerequisite: Undergraduate instrumental analysis

CHEM 673 — Kinetics and Mechanism
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Palfey,Bruce Allan

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Comprehensive treatment of thermodynamic and kinetic aspects of the binding of ligands to macromolecules, the use of rapid reaction techniques in the elucidation of enzyme reaction mechanisms, steady-state catalysis, and isotope effects.

Advisory Prerequisite: CHEM,BIOLCHEM 550 or equiv., Physical Chemistry is recommended

CHEM 720 — Chemical Sciences at the Interface of Education (CSIE) Seminar
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Coppola,Brian P; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Special seminar designed to discuss effective teaching strategies and methods to assess teaching effectiveness. Supervised teaching experiences in conjunction with an accelerated entrance into the research laboratory enable CSIE students to gain experience in curriculum revision for undergraduate lecture and laboratory courses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CHEM 799 — Selected Topics in Chemistry
Section 101, LAB

Instructor: Montgomery,John

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Special topics selected from modern advances in Chemistry.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CHEM 800 — Seminar in Chemical Biology
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Marsh,E Neil G; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 801 — Seminar in Analytical Chemistry
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Meyerhoff,Mark E; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 802 — Seminar in Inorganic Chemistry
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Banaszak Holl,Mark M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 803 — Seminar in Organic Chemistry
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Sanford,Melanie S; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in Chemistry 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 804 — Seminar in Physical Chemistry
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Dunietz,Barry Dov; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 805 — Materials Seminar
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Matzger,Adam J; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 2

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 806 — Departmental Tuesday Seminar
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Lehnert,Nicolai

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 807 — Departmental Thursday Seminar
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Kubarych,Kevin Joel
Instructor: Dunietz,Barry Dov; homepage
Instructor: Hakansson,Kristina I; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 808 — Departmental Friday Seminar
Section 100, SEM

Instructor: Al-Hashimi,Hashim M; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1

Participation in the departmental seminars is required. Each student is expected to attend regularly one section of the weekly seminars and is required to present one seminar during his/her career. It is necessary to register for 2 credit hours in CHEM 80X in the term in which a seminar is given and a grade is given on the presentation. This must be done before admission to candidacy. (A later talk, the thesis colloquium, presenting the subject matter of the dissertation is given after the dissertation has been completed.)

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CHEM 895 — Research in Chemistry
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Research, the core of Michigan's Ph.D. program, involves applying state-of-the-art experimental techniques and theoretical frameworks toward developing a complete understanding of the nature of chemical and biological systems. Although you will be immersed in your chosen area of concentration, you will be encouraged to pursue an interdisciplinary approach to research. As the questions chemists ask become more complex, our vision must focus beyond fundamental chemical sciences into the interface with other disciplines. Joint studies are offered in many areas such as medicinal chemistry, macromolecular science, chemical physics and biophysics. Research groups in the department are organized into several areas:

ANALYTICAL CHEMISTRY. The development of cutting-edge techniques and their application to real-world analytical problems are the research domains of this group at Michigan. Faculty and student research focuses on immunoassay development; chemical sensors; high-speed chromatographic and electrophoretic separations; mass spectrometry; solid-state NMR, vibrational spectroscopy; and spectroscopic imaging. Faculty and students collaborate regularly with biomedical and industrial scientists to tackle difficult analytical challenges in fields ranging from clinical analysis and gene sequencing to chemical process control and environmental monitoring.

CHEMICAL BIOLOGY. Chemical Biology studies the fundamental chemical principles that govern all biological systems. The Chemistry Department at Michigan is home to an exciting multidisciplinary program at the interface between Chemistry and Biology. Synthesis, measurement, and theory of biological molecules (including proteins and nucleic acids) are important components of the program. Particular areas of expertise are Metallo-Biochemistry, Biological Catalysis, Biomolecular Structure & Function, Chemical Genetics & Bioorganic Chemistry, and Chemical Imaging & Sensors. Research in these areas often involves the synthesis of a particular ligand as a probe of biological function, or the use of chemical, biophysical, molecular biological, and genetic methods to modify and examine biomolecular structure and function. Michigan is one of a select group of universities nationwide funded by the National Institutes of Health specifically to train graduate students in this exciting and interfacial research area that spans the departments of Chemistry, Biological Chemistry, and Medicinal Chemistry. The Chemical Biology program at Michigan has pioneered the department wide research course system that provides first year students with the opportunity to work in two or three different laboratories before selecting a research mentor. For more information see: http://www.umich.edu/~chembio/

INORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Inorganic chemists at Michigan pursue a broad array of research topics primarily focused in the areas of bioinorganic and materials chemistry. Current research groups have interests in supramolecular, surface, solid state and polymer chemistry. Objectives include: the design and study of organic-based zeolites and superconductors; microelectronic device structure and reactivity; fire-resistant, liquid-crystalline, and pre-ceramic polymers; catalysts used for oxidation, desulfurization and polymerization of hydrocarbons; high-temperature superconductors; non-linear optical and magnetic materials. There is also a strong interest in bioinorganic chemistry, studies of metal catalyzed reactions in photosynthesis, in elucidating the chemical mechanism of nitrogenase, and in de novo metalloprotein design. Organometallic chemistry, as applied to the activation or recognition of small molecules, represents another area of interest and is often related to biochemical, materials or catalysis themes.

MATERIALS CHEMISTRY. Materials chemistry at Michigan combines well-grounded training in chemical sciences and experiences in the real world of materials. Novel paradigms for the synthesis of monomers for polymeric substances have been undertaken with a keen eye for their metal ligating properties. Whole classes of new substances with unusual thermal, mechanical, electrical and catalytic properties are currently under investigation. Fundamental investigations of the structure and bonding of adsorbed species on surfaces are providing promising leads on corrosion phenomena and new concepts and structures in the design of sensors. Theoretical and experimental studies in supramolecular architecture have led to the development of organic zeolites that have changed the traditional concepts regarding zeolites. Relationships between molecular structure and chemical reactivity are being exploited in designing highly reactive organometallic and metallo-organic precursors for the low temperature synthesis of magnetic, electronic, and structural ceramics. Michigan's program in Materials Chemistry was recently awarded an IGERT (Integrated Graduate Education and Research Training Program) grant from the National Science Foundation to help train the next generation of chemists with interest in materials. For more information see: http://www.umich.edu/~mater/igert.html

ORGANIC CHEMISTRY. Research in organic chemistry at Michigan is broad in scope yet rigorous in approach. Faculty interests include the development of new synthetic methods for the assembly of complex organic molecules in a stereocontrolled fashion; the synthesis of natural (and unnatural) products with unique biological properties and biomedical significance; the design and synthesis of molecular probes of biochemical function; and the preparation of polymers and other molecules of potential use in new materials applications. Organometallic chemistry using both transition metals and main group elements is an active area of research, spanning the range from synthetic methods development to the design of novel promoters of polymerization. A number of industrially sponsored fellowships in the area of organic chemistry are awarded each year to students in the program.

PHYSICAL CHEMISTRY. Research in physical chemistry at Michigan is aimed at developing a comprehensive and fundamental understanding of chemical phenomena, building on a solid foundation in quantum mechanics, statistical mechanics, and chemical kinetics. Current faculty efforts involve the design and application of novel theoretical and experimental methods, from the use of EXAFS, EPR, and solid-state and solution NMR, to the development of theoretical and computational models; from the employment of ultra-high vacuum techniques to the application of microwave, X-ray, gamma-ray, and ultrafast laser spectroscopy. The ubiquitous nature of chemistry leads to exploration in a diverse range of areas, including the study of critical phenomena, non-linear systems, complexity theory, and the excitations and chemical processes that occur at surfaces, in nanostructures, in low-dimensional solids, in the atmosphere, in isolated small molecules and clusters, and in biological systems.

Advisory Prerequisite: Approval of Graduate Committee. Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CHEM 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

CHEM 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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