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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = CLARCH
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 18 of 18
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CLARCH 222 — Introduction to Roman Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ellis,Steven James Ross

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

A millennium and a half after its collapse, the Roman Empire lives on in the popular imagination. No wonder: at its peak, Rome's empire was the largest the world had yet seen, spanning almost 3000 miles from West to East, with a population of 50 million inhabitants. Its capital was the world's first megacity, a sprawling home to a million people from all walks of life. From the movies we have visions of decadent emperors, fearless gladiators, and the teeming masses screaming for blood at the Colosseum. But what was life in ancient Rome really like? This course will move beyond the standard stereotypes and explore the history and culture of the city of Rome and its vast empire. Through the objects the Romans left behind, such as ruined temples, perfume bottles, imperial portraits, and soldiers' helmets, we can use art and archaeology to reconstruct the story of ancient Rome and the experiences of daily life in the Empire. Beginning with Rome's lowly origins as a small village we will trace its rise and eventual fall, traversing the empire from rainy Britain to the sands of the Sahara. Along the way we will explore such topics as politics and power, life in the army, religion, food and drink, entertainments, and the private life of its subjects. The readings and illustrated lectures will provide a broad overview, while weekly discussion sections will focus on specialized topics. There are no prerequisites for the course. Your grade will be based on two 1 hour-long exams, one final exam, and your section participation.

CLARCH 396 — Undergraduate Seminar
Section 001, SEM
The Art and Archaeology of Rome

Instructor: Ellis,Steven James Ross

WN 2007
Credits: 3

From its royal origins under legendary kings, to its growth under noble senators and eventual flourishing and fall under illustrious (and outrageous) emperors, the city of Rome captivates the imagination. To piece together the ruins of this once great metropolis will engage, enthrall, educate, and ultimately fascinate the students of this course. The ‘Art and Archaeology of Rome' will illuminate all parts of the city — from its shanty foundations in the 8th century BC to its enormous constructions of the 4th century AD, and from grandiose public works of art to the minutiae hidden among the decoration of private homes.

Our investigations will be organized topographically and chronologically to chart the emergence and growth of this complex city. The various historic, economic, social and cultural developments that shaped and colored the urban network will inform our lectures and discussions. To that end, we will balance our use of the abundant archaeological and architectural remains with a focused viewing of the art-historic record, while also scrutinising the many tantalizing ancient texts and inscriptions. The combination of these approaches will allow us to reconstruct the ruins of the past — from temples, baths, theatres and arenas, to houses humble and haughty — and to capture the lives of the Romans who built them. Our twice-weekly meetings will take the form of a seminar to promote active participation and discussion, all of which will be fuelled by heavily illustrated slide-shows and prepared readings. Visits to local museum exhibitions will supplement the course whenever possible.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CLARCH 422 — Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K
Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The ancient Etruscans have left many tantalizing traces of their unique culture in the form of temples, towns, and tombs and the wealth of artifacts and works of art they contained. Although often characterized as a mysterious people, we can, in fact, learn a great deal about the Etruscans from their artistic and archaeological remains. This course will examine the material evidence for Etruscan life from the 8th to the 1st century BC, taking into account artistic developments, socioeconomic and political conditions, religious and burial practices, gender issues, and historical events. It will also take note of the influence of Etruscan civilization on the Romans and on later cultural periods in Italy. Twice-weekly slide-illustrated lectures and class discussions will be supplemented when possible by visits to area museums. Readings include a textbook and articles in an electronic course pack. Grading is based on class participation (which includes discussion of reading assignments), two examinations (a midterm and a final based on slide and essay questions), and short writing assignments on Etruscan objects. Students enrolled for graduate credit must also write a substantial research paper on a topic chosen in consultation with the instructor. Students may elect to focus their research on Etruscan artifacts that are being prepared for installation in the new Upjohn wing of the Kelsey Museum. Required textbook: Sibylle Haynes, Etruscan Civilization. Estimated cost $50 or more, but less than $100. IV. 1

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 221 or 222.

CLARCH 424 — Archaeology of the Roman Provinces
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Who were the people living in Palestine and Arabia during the first centuries BCE and CE? What were their traditions, and how did the imposition of Roman hegemony alter the cultural landscape? This class will consider these questions through analysis of the material and visual record. We will explore the character of Nabataean Arabia, Hasmonean and Herodian Judaea, and the interaction that took place between neighboring groups. Focal studies will include urbanization and nomadism, negotiations and expressions of status and wealth, religious art and architecture, and the management of the imperial military and administration.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and CLARCH/HISTART 221 or 222.

CLARCH 433 — Greek Sculpture
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Greek sculpture is known to us today through original figures and reliefs in terracotta, bronze, and marble, and through Roman copies of "masterpieces" already famous by the 2nd and 1st centuries B.C. Of the surviving Greek "originals," a large percentage were architectural, carved to decorate sacred buildings, tombs, and other monuments. These include some of the best-known material survivals of antiquity, such as the sculptures of the Parthenon, or the Pergamon altar. Architectural sculptures are also particularly valuable to the history of Greek sculpture in general, because in comparison with single figures, much more is usually known about their original contexts: when they were made, who paid for them, and where they were set up. This course will provide a chronological survey of this rich body of material, while also addressing certain pervasive thematic questions. Special attention will be paid to the sculptural adornment of Greek temples. What can we learn from these complex and often violent images about Greek social and religious values, and about Greek ideas of the power of representation?

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing, and HISTART 101.

CLARCH 435 — The Art and Archaeology of Asia Minor
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Ratte,Christopher John

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Art and Archaeology of Anatolia

This course provides a chronological survey of the art and archaeology of western Turkey, the place the Greeks called Anatolia, "the land of the rising sun," from the late Bronze Age (15th -12th centuries B.C.) to the Hellenistic period (2nd century B.C.). The course begins by examining the collapse of Aegean Bronze Age civilization from an Anatolian perspective, focusing especially on the archaeology of Troy and the Trojan war, and on the Hittite empire. We will then consider the re-emergence of town life in the Iron Age (11th to 6th centuries B.C.) and the formation of independent kingdoms in places such as Phrygia and Lydia, the lands of Midas and Croesus. Special attention will be paid to the role of Anatolia as an intermediary between the Greek cities of Ionia, on the western coast of Turkey, and the complex civilizations of the ancient Near East — in subjects as diverse as architectural ornament, the evolution of urban form, bronze casting, and the adoption of a written script. In the 6th century B.C., Anatolia was conquered by Persian invaders, who established a unified system of government that lasted until the coming of Alexander the Great in the mid-4th century B.C. In examining the Persian period in Anatolia, we will focus on the career of Mausolus, whose eponymous tomb, the Mausoleum, built and decorated by some of the most famous Greek architects and artists of his day, became one of the seven wonders of the ancient world. The last section of the course will consider the influence of the Anatolian heritage on the development of Hellenistic Greek civilization in sites such as Pergamon, which emerged as the capital of a powerful independent kingdom in the 3rd and 2nd centuries B.C. The archaeological evidence considered in this course comes mainly from excavations carried out at town-sites and monumental cemeteries, and the course will also investigate contemporary developments in Anatolian archaeology, including new research strategies such as regional survey in addition to ongoing excavation.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing.

CLARCH 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Archaeology, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLARCH 496 — Practicum in Museum Studies
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Expr

Allows student to acquire technical and research skills in the field of museum studies.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or seniors, or permission of instructor.

CLARCH 497 — Practicum in Field Archaeology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Expr

Allows student to acquire technical and research skills in the practice of field archaeology.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior or seniors.

CLARCH 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT

Regular reports and conferences required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CLARCH 599 — Supervised Study in Classical Archaeology
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Regular reports and conferences required.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of instructor.

CLARCH 608 — Greek Epigraphy
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Garbrah,Kweku A

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Surveys Greek inscriptions, both classical and early Christian. Epigraphic stone inscriptions are so profuse in antiquity that there is virtually no aspect of ancient life upon which epigraphy does not bear. While many inscriptions provide immediate contact with the daily life of the ancient world, some provide invaluable information about historical events. Epigraphic monuments can be especially valuable in reconstructing social history and are primary witnesses to ancient laws and institutions, social structures, public cults and private associations, and language.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing or permission of instructor.

CLARCH 815 — Hellenistic Cities of the Near East
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Herbert,Sharon C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

A course on Hellenistic Cities of the Near East. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

CLARCH 822 — Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire
Section 001, SEM
Problems in the Art of the Persian Empire: Reading Persepolis

Instructor: Root,Margaret C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar explores the nature and contested meanings of Persepolis, the heartland Iranian capital of the Achaemenid Persian empire (550-330 BCE). It serves students working in diverse areas of ancient studies, urban and architectural studies, and art history/history broadly; it is meant to provide a forum for focused dialogue on two intertwined issues of interdisciplinary and cross-cultural/cross-temporal relevance:(1) the complex historiography of being Persepolis as viewed through western historical sources and their legacies in juxtaposition with the archaeological record of images and architecture, and (2) viable strategies toward interpretation of original intention and subsequent reception in the meanings of an extraordinary program of visual art and built environment produced for the first "world empire."*Ancient texts will be read in translation.

Specialist knowledge in the Achaemenid empire is not a prerequisite.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CLARCH 853 — Problems in Etruscan Art and Archaeology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Gazda,Elaine K
Instructor: Anderson,Bjorn P

WN 2007
Credits: 2 — 3

A course on problems in Etruscan art and archaeology. Content varies by term and instructor.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

CLARCH 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate. Graduate standing.

CLARCH 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

WN 2007
Credits: 1

A seminar for all beginning graduate student instructors, consisting of a two day orientation before the term starts and periodic workshops/meetings during the Fall Term. Beginning graduate student instructors are required to register for this class.

Advisory Prerequisite: Must have GSI award. Graduate standing.

CLARCH 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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