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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = CLCIV
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 11 of 11
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
CLCIV 102 — Classical Civilization II: The Ancient Roman World (in English)
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Seo,Joanne Mira

WN 2007
Credits:
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

What did it mean to be Roman in the Ancient World? Was it all about togas, orgies, and world conquest? Or anxiety, violence, and a propensity for self-destruction? This course will approach the issue of Roman identity from a variety of social, political, and philosophical angles. Using selected Roman historians (e.g., Livy and Tacitus), poets (e.g., Catullus, Vergil, Ovid, and Lucan) as our guides, we will explore who the Romans thought they were, what position they felt their society occupied in the Mediterranean world and in the universe, and how their self-definition changed over time. Particular emphasis will be placed on the ways in which the Romans constructed their past in order to understand who they were in the present. Grade will be based on exams, papers, and participation in discussion sections.

Advisory Prerequisite: FR./SO./PER.

CLCIV 120 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Humanities)
Section 001, SEM
The Dying God in Myth and Literature

Instructor: Reed,Joseph D

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

The figure of the dying god — variously named Adonis, Osiris, or Attis and embodying both beauty and tragedy — has exerted a fascination from ancient times to the present day. Worship was sometimes central to the community, sometimes marginal yet compelling in its "outsider" status. Myths invited meditations on love and death in various modes from comedy to epic. Through the great mythological texts of Greece and Rome as well as modern literature and art, this course explores this figure in all its variety, along with Christian adaptations and recent interpretations.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 121 — First-year Seminar in Classical Civilization (Composition)
Section 001, SEM
War and Remembrance

Instructor: Berlin,Netta

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: FYWR
Other: FYSem, WorldLit

This course centers on Homer's Iliad and its paradigmatic value for military conflict in antiquity and the modern era. The course begins with a close reading of the epic, in particular the dynamic relationship between the narrowly circumscribed subject ("the anger of Achilles") and the complex narrative that transforms this subject into an evocative and enduring account of war. The remainder of the course considers works in a variety of disciplines (e.g., tragedy, philosophy, psychology) for which the Iliad has provided access to understanding war and its call to remembrance.

Advisory Prerequisite: Only first-year students, including those with sophomore standing, may pre-register for First-Year Seminars. All others need permission of instructor.

CLCIV 350 — Topics in Classical Civilization
Section 001, LEC
Ancient Slavery

Instructor: Forsdyke,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: HU, RE
Other: WorldLit

Slavery was widespread in ancient Greece and Rome and was crucial to the social, economic and cultural flourishing of these societies. Nevertheless, the ugly reality of ancient slavery is seldom confronted directly in studies of the ancient world. This course aims to redress this imbalance by offering a detailed examination of the role of slavery in Greek and Roman society. We will begin with the question of how slaves were acquired and what needs (social, economic, and ideological) they satisfied in these cultures. Of particular concern will be the question of how these societies justified the exploitation of slaves and developed (pseudo-) scientific theories and ideologies in support of slavery. Aristotle's theory of natural slavery stands as a particularly infamous example of these justifications. Forms of racist thought, however, can be traced back at least to the fifth century BCE and are based on ethnic prejudices and stereotyping that were prominent throughout antiquity. A major part of the course will be to examine how ancient racist attitudes were constructed (though social practice, discourse and visual representations). In this context we will examine competing modern definitions of racism, and, in particular, the differences between ancient and modern racism.

Along with the ideological aspects of slavery and racism, we will explore the pragmatics of social control and rebellion. For example, we will explore the techniques that masters used to control their slaves, and investigate instances when this control failed, i.e., slave revolts. We will also examine modes of slave resistance (e.g., deliberate negligence, dilatoriness and theft) and the ways that slaves formed a distinctive identity and culture separate from that imposed on them by their masters. Readings about other slave societies (e.g., the American South, Brazil and the Caribbean) will provide crucial comparative evidence and models for exploring aspects of ancient slavery.

Course requirements include active participation in discussions, weekly in-class response papers and quizzes, and take-home midterm and final exams.

Advisory Prerequisite: CLCIV 101 and 102

CLCIV 381 — Witchcraft: An Introduction to the History and Literature of Witchcraft
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Collins,Derek B

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

This course explores witchcraft as a cultural phenomenon. We examine witchcraft from several cross-cultural perspectives, trace the development of witchcraft and the witch stereotype in history, literature, and art from classical antiquity, through the middle ages, to the early modern period in Europe and America.

CLCIV 385 — Greek Mythology
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Verhoogt,Arthur Mfw

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: HU
Other: WorldLit

Greek Mythology comprises a group of traditional stories that discuss a number of universal themes such as creation, death, gods, heroes, the Other, family feuds, local history, and — not to forget — sex and cannibalism. In this course we will study the development of these tales in Greek literature and art. We will look at the myths themselves but also consider the context in which they have come down to us. We should realize that while we see Greek myths largely as a form of entertainment (Disney's Hercules for example), in antiquity myths also offered the Greeks valid explanations of the universe, mankind and society. Our focus will be on the interplay between myths and ancient society in both its contemporary and modern interpretations.

CLCIV 472 — Roman Law
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Frier,Bruce W

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

This course introduces the Roman legal system, and more generally the process and history of legal thinking as it was first developed by the Romans. The course concentrates on the Roman law that concerns wrongs done by one person to another, as a result of which the victim can sue the wrongdoer for damages; in Roman law these are called "delicts" (similar to our torts). Teaching is mainly by the case law method used in law schools. The course is graded on the basis of a midterm examination, a term paper, and a final exam.

Enforced Prerequisites: Sophomore or above.

CLCIV 476 — Pagans and Christians in the Roman World
Section 001, LEC
Pagans and Christians in the Roman Empire.

Instructor: Ahbel-Rappe,Sara L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: WorldLit

In this course, we approach the study of late antiquity through the lens of biographical literature. The life narrative was a ubiquitous genre that proliferated in both polytheistic and Christian circles.

Some of the lives that we focus on are Augustine's Confessions, Athanasius' Life of Anthony, Iamblichus' Life of Pythagoras, Porphyry's Life of Plotinus, Gregory of Nyssa's Life of Makrina, Eusebius' Life of Constantine, and Eunapius' Lives of the Sophists.

Our purpose will be to study the genre of biography as a key to the philosophical and ideological commitments of pagans and Christians, as a way to explore the recruitment techniques of various communities, as a map of pagan and Christian conflict and mutual borrowing, and as genuine documents of pagan and Christian lifestyles.

We start with Philo Judaeus' Life of Moses and the gospel narratives and end with the last pagan professor, Damascius, and his life of Isidore, published some six centuries later. Along the way, we encounter hermits, mystics, virgins, Sophists, wise men and women, Emperors, magicians, and charlatans of every stripe and hue.

Course requirements include reading and reading quizzes, a midterm, two short (four pages) essays, and a final.

CLCIV 480 — Studying Antiquity
Section 001, LEC
The Worlds of Alexander the Great

Instructor: Schmalz,Geoffrey C R

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: ULWR
Other: WorldLit

This course is devoted to exploring the conquests and worlds of Alexander the Great — the worlds of the East that he encountered and conquered, and the new Greco-Persian world that he attempted to create before his early death. It is also about the ‘Internal World' of Alexander himself: the conflicting bibliographic portraits (ancient and modern) of the Great Conqueror in hagiographic terms as a humane and gentle man, and a man of divine destiny and power (a ‘New Achilles'); or as a brilliant but deeply flawed individual, an increasingly delusional victim of his own success, and even a disassociative drunk. The course takes a source-based approach, with a close and comprehensive reading of the two principal ancient biographies of Alexander, Arrian's Anabasis (representing the ‘Official' Alexander tradition) and Curtius Rufus' History of Alexander the Great (representing the ‘Unofficial' or ‘Vulgate' tradition); supplemented by selective fragments of the earliest Alexander sources. Along the way we will also explore the physical and cultural world of Alexander and his legacy for the Hellenistic East, with readings from Michael Wood's In the Footsteps of Alexander the Great.

Enforced Prerequisites: Open only to concentrators in Classical Civilization, Classical Archaeology, Classical Language and Literature, Ancient Greek, Latin, and Modern Greek.

CLCIV 495 — Senior Honors Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Honors, Indpnt Study, WorldLit

Work on the senior Honors thesis in Classical Civilization, under the supervision of a faculty advisor. It provides students with an appropriately designated course in which to undertake research, consultation, and writing necessary for the successful completion of the Senior Honors theses.

Advisory Prerequisite: Upperclass standing

CLCIV 499 — Supervised Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: INDEPENDENT, WorldLit

Undergraduate supervised reading in Classical Civilization.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of Instructor.

 
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