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LSA Course Guide Search Results: UG, GR, Winter 2007, Dept = COMM
 
Page 1 of 1, Results 1 — 69 of 69
Title
Section
Instructor
Term
Credits
Requirements
COMM 101 — The Mass Media
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Squires,Catherine R

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course provides an introductory overview of contemporary mass media systems and an examination of the various factors — historical, economic, political, and cultural — that have shaped their development. The course begins with a description of present print and electronic media and examines their evolution. Attention is given throughout to the legal and ethical implications of mass communication systems and to comparisons between American media systems and those elsewhere in the world. Finally, it considers the probable future course of the media and examines possible alternatives.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have competed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 102 — Media Processes and Effects
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS

This course introduces students to the contemporary research on mass communication processes and effects. Basic processes involved in the production, dissemination, reception, and impact of media messages are examined. The course investigates a variety of effects on individuals' knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors, as well as influences on the functioning of larger social systems. It proceeds in general from investigations of individual-level to societal-level impact. Critical reading and evaluation of research on media processes and effects, and of its application to social policy debates, is encouraged and developed.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 001, LAB

Instructor: Williams,Ann Erin

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 002, LAB

Instructor: Williams,Ann Erin

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 003, LAB

Instructor: Yang,Grace S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 004, LAB

Instructor: Yang,Grace S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 005, LAB

Instructor: Williams,Ann Erin

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 006, LAB

Instructor: Yang,Grace S

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 007, LAB

Instructor: Jones,Bradley Alan

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 008, LAB

Instructor: Jones,Bradley Alan

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 111 — Workshop on Managing the Information Environment
Section 009, LAB

Instructor: Jones,Bradley Alan

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This course is a hands-on workshop intended to develop student mastery of the rapidly developing and expanding electronic information environment. Skills developed include the use of electronic communication systems, data base searching, word processing, data management, and various research uses of public computer networks and the information superhighway. The course introduces students to a range of campus computing resources, including local area networks and available software, and remote access to the Internet and the World Wide Web. Problem-solving assignments are designed to teach strategies used in finding information and evaluating its validity and utility.

This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: First- and second-year students.

COMM 211 — Evaluating Information
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Valentino,Nicholas A

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: SS, QR/1

This course teaches the fundamental thinking skills necessary for critical evaluation of research-based arguments, especially those based on quantitative information. Such skills are required for one to be a competent mass communicator of information, a critical consumer of information relayed by the mass media, or an intelligent scholar of media processes and effects. The course introduces generic logical and statistical concepts through analysis and discussion of specific cases drawn from reporting in the mass media (e.g., health and business news, public opinion polls), research on media effects (e.g. the impact of media violence), and audience research reported in the mass media (e.g., audience research). Students' logical and quantitative reasoning skills are improved through a variety of "hands-on" exercises and projects (many involving computerized spreadsheet programs). The course is introductory in nature, and no prior statistical expertise is required. COMM 111 strongly recommended. This course is one of four prerequisites required for students to have completed before declaring a Communication Studies concentration.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

Advisory Prerequisite: Primarily for first- and second-year students.

COMM 321 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

The internship is designed to provide Communication Studies concentrators limited credit for appropriate practical work experience. Student assessment is based on the academic merit of the work performed, evaluation of the final paper, satisfactory completion of the internship, and written recommendation of the internship sponsor. Registration is by permission of instructor only. The COMM 321 proposal application form is available in the Department office or online and must be submitted to the faculty internship coordinator by the specified deadline.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing, concentration in Communication Studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged.

COMM 321 — Undergraduate Internship
Section 011, IND

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3
Other: Expr

The internship is designed to provide Communication Studies concentrators limited credit for appropriate practical work experience. Student assessment is based on the academic merit of the work performed, evaluation of the final paper, satisfactory completion of the internship, and written recommendation of the internship sponsor. Registration is by permission of instructor only. The COMM 321 proposal application form is available in the Department office or online and must be submitted to the faculty internship coordinator by the specified deadline.

Advisory Prerequisite: Junior standing, concentration in Communication Studies, and permission of instructor. Internship credit is not retroactive and must be prearranged.

COMM 351 — Structure and Function of Media Systems
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines research and scholarship focused on existing media institutions, their genesis and current lines of development, institutional arrangements, organization and operation, economic structure, and characteristic communications "output." Course topics may include: the history of media systems; media and government, including legal, regulatory and free-expression issues; media economics; international media systems; technologies; media organizational routines; and the values and behavior of media professionals. The course investigates the ways in which institutional, economic, and organizational arrangements affect professional behavior and media content, with attention to media system changes over time and in comparative contexts. May not be repeated for credit.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 361 — Processes of Mediated Communication
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Campbell,Scott Walker

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course examines general phenomena involved with the creation, dissemination, and reception of mediated information. Course topics may include: information processing, including message encoding and decoding; media priming and framing of evaluations and decisions; influences of message structure and communication modalities on processing; media use and reception, including interpretive processes; information flow and control, focusing on influences of communication networks, message diffusion, and information gate-keeping; and communicative processes of learning, persuasion and social influence. The emphasis is on the development and testing of general theories explaining how mediated communication works, even though research examined will center on particular cases (e.g., studies of priming in political communication). May not be repeated for credit.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 371 — Media, Culture, and Society
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Vaillant,Derek W

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course explores social and cultural approaches to the study of mass communication. Course topics studied may include: communication and social identity, including race, ethnicity and gender; media's role in defining and reflecting culture; the equity of community, state, and worldwide information systems, including debates over the "new world communication order," post-colonialism, and globalization; media audiences as interpretive communities; media and social movements; and the role of media in altering and maintaining political and social order. Research on mass communication is examined in connection with broader questions about the relations between cultural systems and social formations, and about the dynamics of social and cultural change and contestation.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 381 — Media Impact on Knowledge, Values, and Behavior
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Greenwood,Dara N

WN 2007
Credits: 4
Reqs: ULWR

This course critically evaluates research and scholarship focused on the impact of mass communication in a variety of substantive domains including the impact of media on knowledge, social values, and behavior. Policy applications of media effects research and the use of mass communication in public information campaigns are also reviewed. Media impact is treated both in theoretical and applied terms. The research examined spans levels of analysis, including effects on individuals as well as society at large. Topics to be covered include media impact on: social values; educational development; political behavior; violence and aggressive behavior; consumer behavior; and public opinion. Research on the use of mass communication in public information campaigns is also reviewed, as is the role of media research in providing guidance for social policy makers and media professionals.

Enforced Prerequisites: COMM 101 or 102 with a grade of at least C-

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 001, SEM
Supreme Court News Coverage

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 002, SEM
Supreme Court News Coverage

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This seminar evaluates media coverage of the U.S. Supreme Court, in the context of long-range factors affecting the ability of news media to function in a democracy. This seminar will examine the scope and content of print, broadcast, and new-media news reporting on major cases before the court. How accurately, fairly, and adequately do news organizations cover the cases as they proceed through the legal system? Does the media help the American public gain a sufficiently thorough understanding of the complex legal issues and social impact of each case? In addition to gaining a broad overview of media coverage of current and recent cases, each student will select one case from the current or past court term and study media coverage of it in detail.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 003, SEM
Terrorism News Coverage

Instructor: McDonald,Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will examine the importance, the dangers, the ethical challenges and the new techniques of covering modern conflict, including warfare, combat and terrorism. Using real-world and real-time news events, we'll compare the various and wildly contrasting styles, methods and ideologies of the major American and foreign media outlets, as well as blogs, film, video documentaries, radio, and narrative nonfiction. We'll also discuss the common (and much-abused) terminology now being used in modern news coverage, including concepts such as jihad, fundamentalism, patriotism and democracy. The ultimate aim of the course is to elevate and sharpen our critical thinking about war, terrorism, foreign policy and the news media.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 004, SEM
Terrorism News Coverage

Instructor: McDonald,Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3

In this course we will examine the importance, the dangers, the ethical challenges and the new techniques of covering modern conflict, including warfare, combat and terrorism. Using real-world and real-time news events, we'll compare the various and wildly contrasting styles, methods and ideologies of the major American and foreign media outlets, as well as blogs, film, video documentaries, radio, and narrative nonfiction. We'll also discuss the common (and much-abused) terminology now being used in modern news coverage, including concepts such as jihad, fundamentalism, patriotism and democracy. The ultimate aim of the course is to elevate and sharpen our critical thinking about war, terrorism, foreign policy and the news media.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 005, SEM
The Future of Daily Newspapers.

Instructor: McDonald,Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The news and information landscape is changing at warp speed — in important, exciting and sometimes-bewildering ways. The Old School mainstays — daily newspapers and network newscasts — are under attack from the Internet, blogs, podcasts, RSS and other new delivery platforms. Will the future news environment even include newspapers as we know them today? In this course, using real-time news events, we'll explore the promise and the possible dangers of this changing news environment, while devising strategies and possibilities for an ideal information universe.

COMM 439 — Seminar in Journalistic Performance
Section 006, SEM
The Future of Daily Newspapers.

Instructor: McDonald,Mark

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The news and information landscape is changing at warp speed — in important, exciting and sometimes-bewildering ways. The Old School mainstays — daily newspapers and network newscasts — are under attack from the Internet, blogs, podcasts, RSS and other new delivery platforms. Will the future news environment even include newspapers as we know them today? In this course, using real-time news events, we'll explore the promise and the possible dangers of this changing news environment, while devising strategies and possibilities for an ideal information universe.

COMM 441 — Independent Reading
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4
Other: INDEPENDENT

Credit Exclusions: COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

This course is intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. Must be arranged with a Communication Studies faculty member and approved by the Department. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 441 or 442 may apply to the concentration requirements (additional credit may be applied to the general bachelor's degree requirements). COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined maximum of 8 credits. An application form is available in the Department or online.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of department.

COMM 442 — Independent Research
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 3 — 4

Credit Exclusions: COMM 441 and 442 may be repeated for a combined total of eight credits.

This course is intended for individualized instruction in subject areas not covered by scheduled courses. It is a course of study designed for original, individualized student research under the direction of faculty supervisor. Must be arranged with a Communication Studies faculty member and approved by the Department. A maximum of 3 credits from COMM 441 or 442 may apply to the concentration requirements (additional credit may be applied to the general bachelor's degree requirements). An application form is available in the Department or online.

Advisory Prerequisite: Permission of department.

COMM 454 — Media Economics
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines economic theory and its applications to media systems. Focuses on problems in the economics of the information industry, including market structure, concentration of ownership, pricing policies, product differentiation, advertising behavior, and economic performance. Attention given to the interaction of economics, media practices, and technologies.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 454 — Media Economics
Section 002, LEC

Instructor: Yan,Zhaoxu; homepage

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course examines economic theory and its applications to media systems. Focuses on problems in the economics of the information industry, including market structure, concentration of ownership, pricing policies, product differentiation, advertising behavior, and economic performance. Attention given to the interaction of economics, media practices, and technologies.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 001, LEC
Ethics Issues in Journalism.

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on problems in journalistic ethics at a time of growing concern over standards of news coverage, as exemplified most recently in the Lewinsky case. The course provides an historic overview of traditional journalistic ethics. Coupled with that is a detailed study of changing values in news coverage as media decision makers adapt to social, economic and technological changes. The course highlights such problems as sensationalism, infotainment, anonymous sources, hidden cameras, punditry, the lowering of the wall of separation between the business and editorial sides of news organizations, invasions of privacy, and the personal behavior of journalists. The course studies journalists' responsibilities to their profession and to the public, and examines proposed solutions to the problems of ethics violations.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 002, LEC
Ethics Issues in Journalism.

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course focuses on problems in journalistic ethics at a time of growing concern over standards of news coverage, as exemplified most recently in the Lewinsky case. The course provides an historic overview of traditional journalistic ethics. Coupled with that is a detailed study of changing values in news coverage as media decision makers adapt to social, economic and technological changes. The course highlights such problems as sensationalism, infotainment, anonymous sources, hidden cameras, punditry, the lowering of the wall of separation between the business and editorial sides of news organizations, invasions of privacy, and the personal behavior of journalists. The course studies journalists' responsibilities to their profession and to the public, and examines proposed solutions to the problems of ethics violations.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 003, LEC
Media Criticism.

Instructor: Lotz,Amanda D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will survey a variety of critical and qualitative methods commonly used to study media. Students will explore both the practical aspects of developing studies using various methods as well as examine the strengths and weaknesses of specific methods for answering particular questions. The course also attends to the process of constructing and writing good criticism. The course organizes the study of media into those questions that study texts, audiences, and institutions. We explore multiple methods within each of these categories, including semiotic, narrative, and ideological analysis, ethnography, interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and archival and trade research. The course blends the theoretical and applied aspects of research by including readings that emphasize best practices illustration as well as exemplars from the field.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 004, LEC
Media Criticism.

Instructor: Lotz,Amanda D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will survey a variety of critical and qualitative methods commonly used to study media. Students will explore both the practical aspects of developing studies using various methods as well as examine the strengths and weaknesses of specific methods for answering particular questions. The course also attends to the process of constructing and writing good criticism. The course organizes the study of media into those questions that study texts, audiences, and institutions. We explore multiple methods within each of these categories, including semiotic, narrative, and ideological analysis, ethnography, interviews, focus groups, participant observation, and archival and trade research. The course blends the theoretical and applied aspects of research by including readings that emphasize best practices illustration as well as exemplars from the field.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 005, LEC
Internet, Society, & the Law.

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the development, regulation and impact of the Internet in American society. In particular, we will focus on the expanding legal implications of this still relatively new technology and how the judicial and political apparatuses are trying to keep pace with the Internet's ever-expanding influence in our society. This course will cover the history of the Internet, court cases applying existing laws to the Internet, legislative attempts at additional regulation and theoretical concerns over the technological implications the Internet poses to deeply rooted legal concepts such as fair use.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 006, LEC
Internet, Society, & the Law.

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the development, regulation and impact of the Internet in American society. In particular, we will focus on the expanding legal implications of this still relatively new technology and how the judicial and political apparatuses are trying to keep pace with the Internet's ever-expanding influence in our society. This course will cover the history of the Internet, court cases applying existing laws to the Internet, legislative attempts at additional regulation and theoretical concerns over the technological implications the Internet poses to deeply rooted legal concepts such as fair use.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 007, LEC
Freedom of Expression & the First Amendment.

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the historical development of the First Amendment, including the impact of various philosophies on its development. The course will also focus on various interpretations of the First Amendment and the differing protections afforded to individuals and the media throughout periods of American history. In particular, we will cover the First Amendment during wartime, from the Sedition Acts of 1798 to the implication of the War on Terrorism today. Other topics covered include: fighting words, hate speech, obscenity and indecency, prior restraints, student rights and speech in public schools, and the differing protections afforded various media.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 458 — Special Topics in Media Systems
Section 008, LEC
Freedom of Expression & the First Amendment.

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the historical development of the First Amendment, including the impact of various philosophies on its development. The course will also focus on various interpretations of the First Amendment and the differing protections afforded to individuals and the media throughout periods of American history. In particular, we will cover the First Amendment during wartime, from the Sedition Acts of 1798 to the implication of the War on Terrorism today. Other topics covered include: fighting words, hate speech, obscenity and indecency, prior restraints, student rights and speech in public schools, and the differing protections afforded various media.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 001, SEM
Foreign News Coverage.

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course investigates coverage of foreign news as a reflection of the structure and function of media systems. What factors influence media decisions on covering events overseas? What criteria do the media use for deciding which events to report and at what length, and how valid are these criteria? What value systems do they reflect? How successfully do the media make foreign news relevant to American readers, listeners, and viewers? What special problems do foreign correspondents face?

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 002, SEM
Foreign News Coverage.

Instructor: Collings,Anthony C

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course investigates coverage of foreign news as a reflection of the structure and function of media systems. What factors influence media decisions on covering events overseas? What criteria do the media use for deciding which events to report and at what length, and how valid are these criteria? What value systems do they reflect? How successfully do the media make foreign news relevant to American readers, listeners, and viewers? What special problems do foreign correspondents face?

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 003, SEM
Media, Ethics, & Society

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help you think critically about ethical issues in mass media today. The following questions, among many, will be explored: Does the media have a social responsibility? Are there constraints to the freedoms of the First Amendment and are those constraints based in ethics or the law? How does the resolution of ethical issues affect media and our society? This course will utilize a combination of lecture, student presentation of ethics case briefs and class discussion to explore these issues and many others. Time will be spent on examining various philosophers and theorists to help establish a paradigm for which to examine these issues. In addition, contemporary case studies will be utilized to illustrate the ethical issues confronted in mass media today.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 004, SEM
Media, Ethics, & Society

Instructor: Sparr,Faith M

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The purpose of this course is to help you think critically about ethical issues in mass media today. The following questions, among many, will be explored: Does the media have a social responsibility? Are there constraints to the freedoms of the First Amendment and are those constraints based in ethics or the law? How does the resolution of ethical issues affect media and our society? This course will utilize a combination of lecture, student presentation of ethics case briefs and class discussion to explore these issues and many others. Time will be spent on examining various philosophers and theorists to help establish a paradigm for which to examine these issues. In addition, contemporary case studies will be utilized to illustrate the ethical issues confronted in mass media today.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 005, SEM
Media Policy Shaping American Culture: U.S. Media Policy Since 1900.

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The term "media policy" might suggest the narrow legal or bureaucratic framework within which media are regulated. Looked at more broadly, however, media policy is really about a series of struggles over technology, economics, political power, cultural meaning, and social values. These struggles are waged among a range of institutional and individual actors with different interests and varying degrees of cultural influence.

Looked at even more broadly, media policy is part of our cultural policy — how we as a society organize and structure our cultural selves. And that, in turn, forces us to ask: What kind of society do we want to have? What kind of people do we want to be? What values and principles will we prioritize? What modes of meaning-making will we support, discourage, finance, repress, reward, or censure? In other words, what should our culture do and how can we best get it do that?

This course will examine a range of media and cultural policy questions and issues — historical, contemporary, and future — with an emphasis on their legal, technological, economic, political, cultural, and social dimensions (not necessarily in that order of importance!). In each case, we will seek to understand media policy in terms of how we got the cultural system we have today and how we might think about the cultural system (and society) we want tomorrow.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 459 — Seminar in Media Systems
Section 006, SEM
Media Policy Shaping American Culture: U.S. Media Policy Since 1900.

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The term "media policy" might suggest the narrow legal or bureaucratic framework within which media are regulated. Looked at more broadly, however, media policy is really about a series of struggles over technology, economics, political power, cultural meaning, and social values. These struggles are waged among a range of institutional and individual actors with different interests and varying degrees of cultural influence.

Looked at even more broadly, media policy is part of our cultural policy — how we as a society organize and structure our cultural selves. And that, in turn, forces us to ask: What kind of society do we want to have? What kind of people do we want to be? What values and principles will we prioritize? What modes of meaning-making will we support, discourage, finance, repress, reward, or censure? In other words, what should our culture do and how can we best get it do that?

This course will examine a range of media and cultural policy questions and issues — historical, contemporary, and future — with an emphasis on their legal, technological, economic, political, cultural, and social dimensions (not necessarily in that order of importance!). In each case, we will seek to understand media policy in terms of how we got the cultural system we have today and how we might think about the cultural system (and society) we want tomorrow.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 468 — Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes
Section 001, LEC
Designing Persuasive Communication.

Instructor: Reece,Bonnie Bucks

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Part of a sponsored project on persuasive communication, this interdisciplinary seminar investigates the changes in business, technology, and design that are reshaping the words and images, the form and content of persuasive mass communication. Its aim is to provide students with skills critical to an understanding of both the business and techniques of persuasion. This seminar examines how media content producers design and pitch messages. It challenges participants to use critical methods to evaluate media products and to examine current cultural and economic transformations. It investigates emerging strategies for reaching global and regional audiences, discusses the impact of new technologies and media convergence, and examines the social and ethical issues that underlie persuasive strategies.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 468 — Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes
Section 002, LEC
Talk Radio & Television

Instructor: Scannell,Gerald Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We will first explore the ways in which the study of conversation has come to the fore in Anglo-American philosophy and sociology since the 1950s in order to see why talk is properly to be thought of as the universal medium of communication in everyday life. We will develop a tool-kit' drawing on Pragmatics and Conversation Analysis' for the analysis of 'ordinary' talk and apply this to the analysis of institutional talk on radio and television. The overall aim of the course is to explore how communication 'works' between broadcasters and audiences through the various broadcast formats for talk: the interview, the news report, the sports commentary, DJ monologue, studio 'chat' shows and so on.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 468 — Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes
Section 003, LEC
Talk Radio & Television

Instructor: Scannell,Gerald Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We will first explore the ways in which the study of conversation has come to the fore in Anglo-American philosophy and sociology since the 1950s in order to see why talk is properly to be thought of as the universal medium of communication in everyday life. We will develop a tool-kit' drawing on Pragmatics and Conversation Analysis' for the analysis of 'ordinary' talk and apply this to the analysis of institutional talk on radio and television. The overall aim of the course is to explore how communication 'works' between broadcasters and audiences through the various broadcast formats for talk: the interview, the news report, the sports commentary, DJ monologue, studio 'chat' shows and so on.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 468 — Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes
Section 004, LEC
Propaganda & Persuasion in the Mass Media.

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We know that we don't automatically imitate what we see on TV, nor do we believe everything that we read. The "hypodermic needle" approach to communication studies — in which we posit a relatively direct and uncomplicated connection between what we see or hear and what we think and do — is now widely recognized as too simplistic. At the same time, it would be foolish to claim that the media have no effect on our beliefs, attitudes, ideologies, behaviors, and social relations: certainly advertisers believe that they can influence our thoughts and actions, and history is full of effective media campaigns that have successfully promoted everything from bubble gum to war. This course will begin untangling the complex relationship between mediated efforts at persuasion and the social repercussions of those efforts. But instead of looking at this the way a sociology or media effects class might, we will focus on the rhetorical and institutional strategies of persuasion and propaganda, and the media theories that enable us to understand them. What distinction, if any, can we draw between persuasion and propaganda? How do specific ideologies and social values come to be associated with certain objects or behaviors? What social, political, economic, and cultural conditions seem to favor successful attempts at persuasion and propaganda? How are these attempts most effectively contained or resisted? Drawing on a wide range of media and cultural theory, as well as both contemporary and historical case studies, we will explore the role of persuasion and propaganda in our social and political lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 468 — Special Topics in Mass Communications Processes
Section 005, LEC
Propaganda & Persuasion in the Mass Media.

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

We know that we don't automatically imitate what we see on TV, nor do we believe everything that we read. The "hypodermic needle" approach to communication studies — in which we posit a relatively direct and uncomplicated connection between what we see or hear and what we think and do — is now widely recognized as too simplistic. At the same time, it would be foolish to claim that the media have no effect on our beliefs, attitudes, ideologies, behaviors, and social relations: certainly advertisers believe that they can influence our thoughts and actions, and history is full of effective media campaigns that have successfully promoted everything from bubble gum to war. This course will begin untangling the complex relationship between mediated efforts at persuasion and the social repercussions of those efforts. But instead of looking at this the way a sociology or media effects class might, we will focus on the rhetorical and institutional strategies of persuasion and propaganda, and the media theories that enable us to understand them. What distinction, if any, can we draw between persuasion and propaganda? How do specific ideologies and social values come to be associated with certain objects or behaviors? What social, political, economic, and cultural conditions seem to favor successful attempts at persuasion and propaganda? How are these attempts most effectively contained or resisted? Drawing on a wide range of media and cultural theory, as well as both contemporary and historical case studies, we will explore the role of persuasion and propaganda in our social and political lives.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 001, LEC
Media & Social Movements.

Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the relationship between media and social movements. After a brief survey of the relevant theoretical literatures, we will look at these questions through a series of case studies, organized thematically. These will include decolonization (focusing particularly on the Algerian war of independence and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa), '60s era social movements in the United States (particularly Civil Rights, anti-war protests), and the "new social movements" (with emphasis on the Zapatista movement in Mexico, broad-based resistance to the negative effects of globalization, and the political efforts by and on behalf of AIDS sufferers in South Africa and the US). Throughout the course we will be interested in how media write history and how social movements utilize/engage with media technologies. We will make extensive use of audio-visual media, and some outside viewing of films is required. In addition to active class participation, requirements include a book and film review as well as a final research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 002, LEC
Media & Social Movements.

Instructor: Jacobs,Sean H

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Theme

This course explores the relationship between media and social movements. After a brief survey of the relevant theoretical literatures, we will look at these questions through a series of case studies, organized thematically. These will include decolonization (focusing particularly on the Algerian war of independence and the struggle against apartheid in South Africa), '60s era social movements in the United States (particularly Civil Rights, anti-war protests), and the "new social movements" (with emphasis on the Zapatista movement in Mexico, broad-based resistance to the negative effects of globalization, and the political efforts by and on behalf of AIDS sufferers in South Africa and the US). Throughout the course we will be interested in how media write history and how social movements utilize/engage with media technologies. We will make extensive use of audio-visual media, and some outside viewing of films is required. In addition to active class participation, requirements include a book and film review as well as a final research paper.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 003, LEC
Television & the Meaning of 'Live'.

Instructor: Scannell,Gerald Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will study media 'events' from the notorious Orson Welles War of the Worlds panic in 1938 through to September 11, 2001.

Its approach will be partly historical and partly analytical. The key text will be 'Media Events' by Daniel Dayan and Elihu Katz (Harvard 1992) and we will focus on its subtitle 'the live broadcasting of history' and the two fundamental issues it raises:

  1. the meaning of 'live' television and
  2. the relationship between live broadcasting and History.

    Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 004, LEC
Television & the Meaning of 'Live'.

Instructor: Scannell,Gerald Patrick

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The course will study media 'events' from the notorious Orson Welles War of the Worlds panic in 1938 through to September 11, 2001.

Its approach will be partly historical and partly analytical. The key text will be 'Media Events' by Daniel Dayan and Elihu Katz (Harvard 1992) and we will focus on its subtitle 'the live broadcasting of history' and the two fundamental issues it raises:

  1. the meaning of 'live' television and
  2. the relationship between live broadcasting and History.

    Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 478 — Special Topics in Media and Culture
Section 005, LEC
Race and Ethnicity in Contemporary American Television: Black Comedy

Instructor: Haggins,Bambi L

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Reqs: RE

This course will focus upon representation of race and ethnicity in televisual fiction since the late sixties. By examining the representations of specific communities — marginalized in terms of ethnicity and race — students will be asked to interrogate how these images are constructed, by whom and for whom. The course is designed to make students think about the in mainstream network television, and by doing this we can begin to understand the conflicted and conflictual nature of the interplay between the formation of fluid and multiple identities and how — and by whom — notions of identity are being televisually constructed.

In the winter of 2007, rather than offering a broad survey of ethnic and racial groups as well as genre, the course will focus primarily on African American comedy. Students should note that the required screenings include material that contains profanity, humor of a sexually explicit nature and other subject matter that might be considered both socially and politically controversial.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 479 — Seminar in Media and Culture
Section 001, SEM
Mass Media in the World

Instructor: Vaillant,Derek W

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The twentieth-century emergence of mass-circulation electronic media technologies and commodified forms accelerated processes of communication and cultural exchange between the United States and its neighbors around the world. Mediated forms such as advertising, popular music, film, radio, television, and digital media materials now circulate and "flow" across the boundaries of the nation-state in ways that have profoundly altered the meanings of popular culture all over the world. Theorists and historians alike have suggested different ways of modeling these changes and their significance for media, culture, and global society. Beginning with attention to some of the key theoretical literature on these questions this course will move into a series of historical and contemporary case studies in Europe, Latin America, and the Far East.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 479 — Seminar in Media and Culture
Section 002, SEM
Mass Media in the World

Instructor: Vaillant,Derek W

WN 2007
Credits: 3

The twentieth-century emergence of mass-circulation electronic media technologies and commodified forms accelerated processes of communication and cultural exchange between the United States and its neighbors around the world. Mediated forms such as advertising, popular music, film, radio, television, and digital media materials now circulate and "flow" across the boundaries of the nation-state in ways that have profoundly altered the meanings of popular culture all over the world. Theorists and historians alike have suggested different ways of modeling these changes and their significance for media, culture, and global society. Beginning with attention to some of the key theoretical literature on these questions this course will move into a series of historical and contemporary case studies in Europe, Latin America, and the Far East.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 351 or 371 strongly recommended.

COMM 481 — Media and Violence
Section 001, LEC

Instructor: Huesmann,L Rowell

WN 2007
Credits: 4

This course examines the theoretical and empirical research bearing upon the connections between mass communication and aggressive behavior. Analyzes depictions of violence in contemporary media and the possible mechanisms through which these depictions can influence attitudes toward violence and violent behavior. The course is designed to explore in-depth the literature on the prevalence of violent themes in television, film, and other popular media, and to investigate the psychological and social mechanisms through which media portrayals might influence attitudes and behavior. The main focus is on media and violence in contemporary American culture, but cross-national comparisons and historical trends are examined as well. Critical attention is given to the linkages between the research literature and issues of media policy.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 361 or 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 488 — Special Topics in Media Effects
Section 001, LEC
Social Consequences of Mobile Communications.

Instructor: Campbell,Scott Walker

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the social consequences of mobile communication and the role that the mobile communication technology plays in the reformulation of everyday life. Key areas of interest include use of the technology for safety/security, changes in how we coordinate meetings and social interactions, the emancipation of teens from their parents through mobile communication practices, and emerging norms for private use of the technology in the public sphere. In addition, the course will explore adoption patterns, international perspectives on mobile communication, intersections between mass and interpersonal communication, and theoretical approaches.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 488 — Special Topics in Media Effects
Section 002, LEC
Social Consequences of Mobile Communications.

Instructor: Campbell,Scott Walker

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course will examine the social consequences of mobile communication and the role that the mobile communication technology plays in the reformulation of everyday life. Key areas of interest include use of the technology for safety/security, changes in how we coordinate meetings and social interactions, the emancipation of teens from their parents through mobile communication practices, and emerging norms for private use of the technology in the public sphere. In addition, the course will explore adoption patterns, international perspectives on mobile communication, intersections between mass and interpersonal communication, and theoretical approaches.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 488 — Special Topics in Media Effects
Section 003, LEC
Media's Role in American Democracy

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

It is both an ancient idea and a surprisingly modern one. It is an indispensable feature of democracy, but one that is just possibly also a complete fiction. It is the public sphere, the physical or metaphorical space in which "we the people" deliberate about common problems and arrive at solutions. But there are major differences between conducting democracy at a village meeting in the town hall and conducting democracy for a whole nation through the mass media.

Although we often unquestioningly accept such public-sphere notions as "public opinion" and "the voice of the people," the closer you look at the mediated public sphere, the more elusive and problematic it becomes. Who gets to be counted as a member of the "public"? How are the strengths and weaknesses of the mass media as public spheres? How does the will of the public, once it presumably has been hashed out in the mediated public sphere, actually get translated into effective action? In this course, we will look at a wide range of ideas about the "public" and the "public sphere," thinking through how conceptions of the public sphere have changed since the rise of the mass media and how we might understand them today. We will also apply these ideas to contemporary examples, using theories of the media's role in democracy to analyze political activity and "public-ness" in the various publics of which we might be a part.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 488 — Special Topics in Media Effects
Section 004, LEC
Media's Role in American Democracy

Instructor: Kirkpatrick,Milton William

WN 2007
Credits: 3

It is both an ancient idea and a surprisingly modern one. It is an indispensable feature of democracy, but one that is just possibly also a complete fiction. It is the public sphere, the physical or metaphorical space in which "we the people" deliberate about common problems and arrive at solutions. But there are major differences between conducting democracy at a village meeting in the town hall and conducting democracy for a whole nation through the mass media.

Although we often unquestioningly accept such public-sphere notions as "public opinion" and "the voice of the people," the closer you look at the mediated public sphere, the more elusive and problematic it becomes. Who gets to be counted as a member of the "public"? How are the strengths and weaknesses of the mass media as public spheres? How does the will of the public, once it presumably has been hashed out in the mediated public sphere, actually get translated into effective action? In this course, we will look at a wide range of ideas about the "public" and the "public sphere," thinking through how conceptions of the public sphere have changed since the rise of the mass media and how we might understand them today. We will also apply these ideas to contemporary examples, using theories of the media's role in democracy to analyze political activity and "public-ness" in the various publics of which we might be a part.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 381 strongly recommended.

COMM 492 — Senior Honors Thesis
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Valentino,Nicholas A

WN 2007
Credits: 3
Other: Honors

This is the second in a two-part honors seminar program and culminates in the composition of a senior honors thesis. Students must have successfully completed COMM 491. This course is offered only in winter term and meets only on occasion, based on a schedule to be arranged at the first class session. Students work directly with their thesis advisers, and are expected to meet regularly with them for direction and assistance.

Advisory Prerequisite: COMM 491 and permission of instructor.

COMM 699 — First-Year Research Project
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 2
Other: INDEPENDENT

Students are required to begin a research project during their first year with the goal of completing it by the end of the fall term their second year. The project must be written up in the form of an article suitable for submission to a journal although publications is not an explicit part of the requirement. During the second year, the student will present the results of the project to the program proseminar.

First-year students are assigned an initial advisor with whom to work. The first-year project may be conducted collaboratively with that faculty member and such collaborative research is strongly encouraged. However, students may conduct more independent projects or collaborate with other faculty members if they wish.

Students will begin discussing the First-Year Research Project with their advisor in the fall term of their first year. They will register for the First-Year Research Project (COMM 699) with the faculty member with whom they are collaborating during both the winter academic term of their first year and the fall academic term of their second year.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMM 772 — Mass Communication and the Individual
Section 001, SEM

Instructor: Greenwood,Dara N

WN 2007
Credits: 3

Provides students with a broad introduction to theory and research on mass communication and the individual. The seminar's two main goals are first to introduce students to some of the major theoretical approaches to research on the social psychological effects of mass media on the individual, and second, to offer new researchers a forum for developing and exercising basic skills in reading, understanding, and writing theoretical and empirical social scientific work. The course focuses primarily, though not exclusively, on communication and social psychological research conducted within a social scientific framework. Students will encounter topics that have received a great deal of attention in the literature on mass communication uses and effects. Given time and practical constraints, however, only selected topics can be included. This course is intended to provide a solid foundation for students to build upon in their subsequent coursework.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM 783 — Research Methods II
Section 001, SEM
Quant Meth for Res on Mass Med

Instructor: Bushman,Brad J

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This seminar is the second part of the two-part research methods and design series. This course involves a comprehensive review of the argument for good measurement. Students will survey several practical measurement techniques that are common among communications researchers. In addition, existing datasets will be explored in order to get hands-on training in quantitative data analysis including internal reliability, scaling, factor analysis, and other measurement techniques. The course focuses on the relationship between conceptualization and measurement, giving students the opportunity to begin thinking about the measurement techniques that are relevant to concepts of interest to them.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM 799 — Directed Study
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 3

Designed for individual students who have an interest in a specific topic (usually that has stemmed from a previous course). An individual instructor must agree to direct such a reading, and the requirements are specified when approval is granted.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMM 810 — Seminar in Communication
Section 001, SEM
Feminist Media Studies

Instructor: Lotz,Amanda D

WN 2007
Credits: 3

This course provides graduate students with an introduction to key debates and ideas and various critical and cultural approaches to feminist studies of media, including textual, institutional, and audience methodologies. Our primary objective will be to establish a foundational basis necessary for considering the relationship between sex, gender, feminism, and media in the United States. The course will begin with a survey of reading drawn from communication, cultural studies, and television and film theory in order to establish the discrepant approaches to the study of gender and feminism in these various media traditions. We will read key texts in the field in order to establish the central areas of analysis, including recent discussions of postfeminism as a critical category of media study. The second half of the class will include a set of readings meant to indicate the diverse approaches employed by feminist media scholars. Much of the course readings will focus on feminist television studies, but students will be encouraged to explore interests in other media in their original work. This course is intended to provide students with an initial set of tools with which they might apply to particular media and topics of interest.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing and permission of instructor.

COMM 900 — Preliminary Examination Preparation
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 6

When all course requirements have been met and the First Year Research Project has been satisfactorily completed, the student may begin preparation for the three preliminary examinations. This course is taken under the supervision of the faculty advisor and is meant to give the student an opportunity to review the readings that will be covered on the exams. Students are expected to complete their preliminary exams by the end of their third year.

Advisory Prerequisite: Pre-doctoral standing. permission of instructor.

COMM 990 — Dissertation/Precandidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 1 — 8

Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing. Election for dissertation work by doctoral student not yet admitted as a Candidate.

COMM 993 — Graduate Student Instructor Training Program
Section 001, SEM
Seminar for Instructors

Instructor: Traugott,Michael W

WN 2007
Credits: 1

This seminar is intended for Graduate Student Instructors who are teaching in the College of LS&A, and specifically in the Department of Communication Studies, for the first time. The seminar will be a practical workshop designed to help GSIs develop the expertise and confidence needed to teach well. Readings will consist of short articles on social science pedagogy and of actual course materials — syllabi, assignments, student papers, and instructor comments. The latter materials will be drawn from the courses that seminar members are teaching currently, as well as from courses taught by other instructors.

Advisory Prerequisite: Graduate standing.

COMM 995 — Dissertation/Candidate
Section 001, IND

WN 2007
Credits: 8

Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate. N.B. The defense of the dissertation (the final oral examination) must be held under a full term Candidacy enrollment period.

Enforced Prerequisites: Graduate School authorization for admission as a doctoral Candidate

 
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